Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Jigging

Good news from Malaysia:

The Terengganu International Squid Jigging Festival (TISJF) will be continued and become an annual event as one of the state's main tourism products, said Menteri Besar Datuk Seri Ahmad Said.

He said TISJF will become a signature event intended to enhance the branding of Terengganu as a leading tourism destination in the region.

"Beside introducing squid jigging as a leisure activity, the event also highlights the state's beautiful beaches, lakes and islands and also our arts, culture and heritage," he said.

I assume that Malaysian squid jigging is the same as American squid jigging. But I don't really know.


As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven't covered.

Posted on April 18, 2014 at 4:16 PM63 Comments

Metaphors of Surveillance

There's a new study looking at the metaphors we use to describe surveillance.

Over 62 days between December and February, we combed through 133 articles by 105 different authors and over 60 news outlets. We found that 91 percent of the articles contained metaphors about surveillance. There is rich thematic diversity in the types of metaphors that are used, but there is also a failure of imagination in using literature to describe surveillance.

Over 9 percent of the articles in our study contained metaphors related to the act of collection; 8 percent to literature (more on that later); about 6 percent to nautical themes; and more than 3 percent to authoritarian regimes.

On the one hand, journalists and bloggers have been extremely creative in attempting to describe government surveillance, for example, by using a variety of metaphors related to the act of collection: sweep, harvest, gather, scoop, glean, pluck, trap. These also include nautical metaphors, such as trawling, tentacles, harbor, net, and inundation. These metaphors seem to fit with data and information flows.

The only literature metaphor used is the book 1984.

This is sad. I agree with Daniel Solove that Kafka's The Trial is a much better literary metaphor. This article suggests some other literary metaphors, most notably Philip K. Dick. And this one suggests the Eye of Sauron.

Posted on April 18, 2014 at 2:21 PM10 Comments

Overreacting to Risk

This is a crazy overreaction:

A 19-year-old man was caught on camera urinating in a reservoir that holds Portland's drinking water Wednesday, according to city officials.

Now the city must drain 38 million gallons of water from Reservoir 5 at Mount Tabor Park in southeast Portland.

I understand the natural human disgust reaction, but do these people actually think that their normal drinking water is any more pure? That a single human is that much worse than all the normal birds and other animals? A few ounces distributed amongst 38 million gallons is negligible.

Another story.

Posted on April 18, 2014 at 6:26 AM73 Comments

Tails

Nice article on the Tails stateless operating system. I use it. Initially I would boot my regular computer with Tails on a USB stick, but I went out and bought a remaindered computer from Best Buy for $250 and now use that.

Posted on April 17, 2014 at 1:38 PM44 Comments

Book Title

I previously posted that I am writing a book on security and power. Here are some title suggestions:

  • Permanent Record: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World

  • Hunt and Gather: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World

  • They Already Know: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World

  • We Already Know: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World

  • Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World

  • All About You: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World

  • Tracked: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World

  • Tracking You: The Forces that Capture Your Data and Control Your World

  • Data: The New Currency of Power

My absolute favorite is Data and Goliath, but there's a problem. Malcolm Gladwell recently published a book with the title of David and Goliath. Normally I wouldn't care, but I published my Liars and Outliers soon after Gladwell published Outliers. Both similarities are coincidences, but aping him twice feels like a bit much.

Anyway, comments on the above titles -- and suggestions for new ones -- are appreciated.

The book is still scheduled for February publication. I hope to have a first draft done by the end of June, and a final manuscript by the end of October. If anyone is willing to read and comment on a draft manuscript between those two months, please let me know in e-mail.

Posted on April 16, 2014 at 9:32 AM205 Comments

Auditing TrueCrypt

Recently, Matthew Green has been leading an independent project to audit TrueCrypt. Phase I, a source code audit by iSEC Partners, is complete. Next up is Phase II, formal cryptanalysis.

Quick summary: I'm still using it.

Posted on April 15, 2014 at 6:56 AM50 Comments

Schneier Speaking Schedule: April–May

Here's my upcoming speaking schedule for April and May:

Information about all my speaking engagements can be found here.

Posted on April 14, 2014 at 2:11 PM7 Comments

GoGo Wireless Adds Surveillance Capabilities for Government

The important piece of this story is not that GoGo complies with the law, but that it goes above and beyond what is required by law. It has voluntarily decided to violate your privacy and turn your data over to the government.

Posted on April 14, 2014 at 9:19 AM17 Comments

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