Cryptanalysis of an Old Zip Encryption Algorithm

Mike Stay broke an old zipfile encryption algorithm to recover $300,000 in bitcoin.

DefCon talk here.

Posted on August 12, 2020 at 6:08 AM15 Comments

Collecting and Selling Mobile Phone Location Data

The Wall Street Journal has an article about a company called Anomaly Six LLC that has an SDK that's used by "more than 500 mobile applications." Through that SDK, the company collects location data from users, which it then sells.

Anomaly Six is a federal contractor that provides global-location-data products to branches of the U.S. government and private-sector clients. The company told The Wall Street Journal it restricts the sale of U.S. mobile phone movement data only to nongovernmental, private-sector clients.

[...]

Anomaly Six was founded by defense-contracting veterans who worked closely with government agencies for most of their careers and built a company to cater in part to national-security agencies, according to court records and interviews.

Just one of the many Internet companies spying on our every move for profit. And I'm sure they sell to the US government; it's legal and why would they forgo those sales?

Posted on August 11, 2020 at 6:00 AM16 Comments

Smart Lock Vulnerability

Yet another Internet-connected door lock is insecure:

Sold by retailers including Amazon, Walmart, and Home Depot, U-Tec's $139.99 UltraLoq is marketed as a "secure and versatile smart deadbolt that offers keyless entry via your Bluetooth-enabled smartphone and code."

Users can share temporary codes and 'Ekeys' to friends and guests for scheduled access, but according to Tripwire researcher Craig Young, a hacker able to sniff out the device's MAC address can help themselves to an access key, too.

UltraLoq eventually fixed the vulnerabilities, but not in a way that should give you any confidence that they know what they're doing.

EDITED TO ADD (8/12): More.

Posted on August 10, 2020 at 6:23 AM30 Comments

Friday Squid Blogging: New SQUID

There's a new SQUID:

A new device that relies on flowing clouds of ultracold atoms promises potential tests of the intersection between the weirdness of the quantum world and the familiarity of the macroscopic world we experience every day. The atomtronic Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is also potentially useful for ultrasensitive rotation measurements and as a component in quantum computers.

"In a conventional SQUID, the quantum interference in electron currents can be used to make one of the most sensitive magnetic field detectors," said Changhyun Ryu, a physicist with the Material Physics and Applications Quantum group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. "We use neutral atoms rather than charged electrons. Instead of responding to magnetic fields, the atomtronic version of a SQUID is sensitive to mechanical rotation."

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven't covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Posted on August 7, 2020 at 4:08 PM155 Comments

The NSA on the Risks of Exposing Location Data

The NSA has issued an advisory on the risks of location data.

Mitigations reduce, but do not eliminate, location tracking risks in mobile devices. Most users rely on features disabled by such mitigations, making such safeguards impractical. Users should be aware of these risks and take action based on their specific situation and risk tolerance. When location exposure could be detrimental to a mission, users should prioritize mission risk and apply location tracking mitigations to the greatest extent possible. While the guidance in this document may be useful to a wide range of users, it is intended primarily for NSS/DoD system users.

The document provides a list of mitigation strategies, including turning things off:

If it is critical that location is not revealed for a particular mission, consider the following recommendations:

  • Determine a non-sensitive location where devices with wireless capabilities can be secured prior to the start of any activities. Ensure that the mission site cannot be predicted from this location.
  • Leave all devices with any wireless capabilities (including personal devices) at this non-sensitive location. Turning off the device may not be sufficient if a device has been compromised.
  • For mission transportation, use vehicles without built-in wireless communication capabilities, or turn off the capabilities, if possible.

Of course, turning off your wireless devices is itself a signal that something is going on. It's hard to be clandestine in our always connected world.

News articles.

Posted on August 6, 2020 at 12:15 PM41 Comments

BlackBerry Phone Cracked

Australia is reporting that a BlackBerry device has been cracked after five years:

An encrypted BlackBerry device that was cracked five years after it was first seized by police is poised to be the key piece of evidence in one of the state's longest-running drug importation investigations.

In April, new technology "capabilities" allowed authorities to probe the encrypted device....

No details about those capabilities.

Posted on August 3, 2020 at 11:54 AM18 Comments

Twitter Hacker Arrested

A 17-year-old Florida boy was arrested and charged with last week's Twitter hack.

News articles. Boing Boing post. Florida state attorney press release.

This is a developing story. Post any additional news in the comments.

EDITED TO ADD (8/1): Two others have been charged as well.

EDITED TO ADD (8/11): The online bail hearing was hacked.

Posted on July 31, 2020 at 4:03 PM16 Comments

Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Proteins for a Better Face Mask

Researchers are synthesizing squid proteins to create a face mask that better survives cleaning. (And you thought there was no connection between squid and COVID-19.) The military thinks this might have applications for self-healing robots.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven't covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Posted on July 31, 2020 at 4:00 PM148 Comments

Data and Goliath Book Placement

Notice the copy of Data and Goliath just behind the head of Maine Senator Angus King.

Screenshot of MSNBC interview with Angus King

This demonstrates the importance of a vibrant color and a large font.

Posted on July 31, 2020 at 2:04 PM13 Comments

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.