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December 3, 2021 11:21 PM

Clive Robinson on Apple Sues NSO Group :

@ Ted, Izzy, ResearcherZero, SpaceLifeForm, ALL,

… previous history that I hadn’t known. Some of which I see was discussed…

There is a lot more yet to be discussed.

1, It’s almost certain that US Officials have been targeted for quite some time.

2, It’s very likely parts of the US Gov and Executive knew this from NSA and similar activities and for various reasons chose to ignore it.

3, It’s very likely that parts of the Israeli Government were not just aware of this but actively encoraged it...

December 3, 2021 9:34 PM

JonKnowsNothing on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

@Clive @All

re: O-heck Deja Vu

Yes, California has the distinction of the 1st US case of O-H. Although I am pretty sure we will find there are some going back into October 2021 or earlier.

One comparison I saw had D as R-5 and O has R-6.3.

It has been clear that 3-Jabs won’t stop you from getting sick with O-H. I’ve not seen anything specific on severity across the bigger population of 1Jab, 2Jab, 3Jab, and NoJabs beyond the current problems with D...

December 3, 2021 9:22 PM

SpaceLifeForm on Friday Squid Blogging: Squeeze the Squid :

@ popehat, mmasnick, emptywheel, bmaz

It has always been RICO

The perps can not spell that.

Four letters is an overflow condition.

December 3, 2021 8:28 PM

SpaceLifeForm on Apple Sues NSO Group :

@ Ted, Clive, ResearcherZero

There is a specific ship of state, that has been leaking for decades.

For some reason, the rats never leave.

The bilge pumps are about to fail.

We need to let it dock so we can capture the rats.

December 3, 2021 8:27 PM

JPA on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

I think when people refer to “natural law” they are referring to the process of using relationships or process inferred from the study of nature to creating human laws. This can be quite dangerous, as humans have a very limited understanding of the processes by which nature operates and applying that limited understanding to structuring human society causes problems.

For example, the misunderstanding of Darwinian evolution was applied to social Darwinism and used to justify forced sterilization, eugenics, and genocide...

December 3, 2021 7:46 PM

Ted on Apple Sues NSO Group :

@ResearcherZero, Clive, SpaceLifeForm, Izzy

Once it became personal however, then the government became more focused.

You have some really great thoughts. Also I just started reading the Nov 4 “On Pegasus” article you posted. Looks really interesting so far. Thanks so much for sharing.

The Kerr/Lubin Lawfare podcast summed up some previous history that I hadn’t known. Some of which I see was discussed here, as Bruce wrote in July:...

December 3, 2021 7:21 PM

Jon on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@ Winter

I’m afraid those are very poor examples.

Then there are no crimes against humanity, or war crimes, or unjust laws. There is only national law.

a) Crimes against humanity are crimes because there are laws about it – not “natural”, but enacted and enforced (sometimes).
b) War crimes are crimes for the same reason.
c) Law and laws are not justice. There may be some overlap – but in a lot of cases there is not. Equating the two is nonsense...

December 3, 2021 6:45 PM

ResearcherZero on Testing Faraday Cages :

Israeli officials not only ‘permitted’ the sale of NSO and other cyber weapons to authoritarian states that would put them to questionable uses but ‘encouraged’ it, using these backroom deals to buy the public support of countries which had been hostile to Israel.
https://www.lrb.co.uk/the-paper/v43/n21/edan-ring/on-pegasus

Though companies may protest otherwise, many were only too happy to give up everyone’s data and privacy if it meant they received the investment...

December 3, 2021 6:36 PM

ResearcherZero on Testing Faraday Cages :

@vas pup

Big Brother is hardly going to consider giving out contracts to anyone who isn’t willing to be friends. Where would lay the financial incentive, and likewise the commercial success of those friends?

December 3, 2021 6:32 PM

SpaceLifeForm on Apple Sues NSO Group :

@ Ted, Clive, ResearcherZero

Even if the ships are not visible, the signal does travel over the horizon.

December 3, 2021 6:32 PM

Yavol, we halve no bananas on Friday Squid Blogging: Squeeze the Squid :

Granted, this is allegedly from the calender year of 2017, however;
America, we seem to have a problem(!):

freethoughtblogs.com/pharyngula/files/2015/10/gundeaths.jpeg

Does anyone have a more updated chart of this?

December 3, 2021 6:20 PM

ResearcherZero on Friday Squid Blogging: Squeeze the Squid :

@name.withheld.for.obvious.reasons

This is a problem around the world. The internet and the flow of information threatens “might makes right”, hence we see an increasing flow of disinformation and misinformation, much from authoritarian states.

The free flow of information also threatens the privileged members of society, who have long ‘closed ranks’ to maintain this privilege. Hence they are only too willing to allow the increase of surveillance powers, in a hope it will help them maintain their authoritative and privileged position...

December 3, 2021 5:54 PM

ResearcherZero on Apple Sues NSO Group :

@Ted

I think so too.

When it’s government employees getting hacked, it’s a completely different matter than just civilians, NGOs, journalists.

It’s like the debate over anonymity on social media. When it was just a matter of some women and less represented members of society being trolled on social media, the politicians had little interest. Once it became personal however, then the government became more focused...

December 3, 2021 5:41 PM

name.withheld.for.obvious.reasons on Friday Squid Blogging: Squeeze the Squid :

Civil Rights, in Absence, Confer a Level of Civic Security?

What say ye…

With the attack and outright disregard for civil and human rights in the United States, does this represent a threat to individual or collective security? Does life and liberty infer a right to its pursuit? Does self governance require individuals to honor others rights? As those that confuse political and governance as purely an exercise do not recognize the personal security it affords. Devolving into a “might makes right” renders many vulnerable to a authoritarian aggregation of power and control...

December 3, 2021 5:38 PM

Izzy on Friday Squid Blogging: Squeeze the Squid :

Apple has alerted 11 U.S. Embassy employees that their iPhones had been hacked in recent months by Pegasus spyware from NSO Group, an Israel-based company that licenses software to government clients in dozens of countries that allows them to secretly steal files, eavesdrop on conversations and track the movements of its targets, according to people familiar with the notifications.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2021/12/03/israel-nso-pegasus-hack-us-diplomats/...

December 3, 2021 5:09 PM

Scam Coin on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Jesse

“Both kinds of code are almost by definition rife with bugs, and both kinds of hardware are orders of magnitude too complex for anyone to properly audit for exploits.”

This is without doubt true but lacks context. The first is that we have thousands of years of experience working with and living under fiat currencies and associated legal codes. We have no experience with cryptocurrencies. The second is, as already stated, the problem with cryptocurrencies isn’t just in what they are, it is in what they hope to achieve. Cryptocurrency ...

December 3, 2021 4:52 PM

SpaceLifeForm on Testing Faraday Cages :

Fresh Cookies

Power off phone. Remove battery if possible. Place in cookie tin. Put a layer of Aluminum Foil over top. Replace lid. Store in fridge.

Well, that was how you could keep the cookies fresh back in the pre-cellphone days.

December 3, 2021 4:31 PM

vas pup on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Alan
Yeah, it is working if you turn it off by removing battery if design let you do that.

Time and again: Apple, Samsung, you name it are friends of Big Brother (not only Chinese manufacturers), not yours as a customer.
Otherwise their design will provide you not BB or hackers with full control with power off switch as real HARDWARE kill switch for battery, then you don’t need all Faraday Cages altogether...

December 3, 2021 4:02 PM

JonKnowsNothing on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Jesse Thompson, @All

re: Human vs Machine decisions

In theory, although open to challenge:

  • Humans have brains, intelligence, smarts and a wider scope of knowledge.
  • Machines have a lesser scope but can chunk through reams of GIGO faster.
  • Machines cannot change their minds (they have none to change).
  • Humans change their minds all the time (although sometimes it many seem they have nothing changeable in that department either)...

December 3, 2021 3:54 PM

David Leppik on Testing Faraday Cages :

I was working on Bluetooth software a while ago with a lot of debugging the no-signal case. Not being an electrical engineer, I expected that putting my device in a metal tin would work perfectly. As the original article noted, that’s not the case! I tried grounding the tin; still didn’t stop the signal all the time.

Eventually I ended up putting the device in the tin, then into the refrigerator, when I needed to reliably block the signal...

December 3, 2021 3:44 PM

Ted on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Bear

I once believed in cookie tins.

How frustrating. I volunteer to try Ferrero Rocher. For the foil of course.

December 3, 2021 3:41 PM

John on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Clive,

Tracking generator makes testing MUCH easier :). I would not trust the ‘tests’ as they are described. Spacings are too close.

Better operational test is to look for ‘shielded’ cell phone emission outside the ‘box’. Also, try to send SMS and calls to the phone inside.

Then try moving closer to the serving tower.

Removing battery works the best :).

I did some physics work with a triple shielded room. Not much RF inside it!!!...

December 3, 2021 3:40 PM

Clive Robinson on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

@ JonKnowsNothing,

Some more O-heck news out of SA.

There has been a paper published based on observation of about 36000 people who have so far got a replay with O-heck…

In SA they have found if you had a primary infection and you are unjabbed your risk of getting Delta was 0.71 but with O-heck it appears to be 2.4… Yup that is high.

No figures yet on those that have been jabbed and their risk...

December 3, 2021 3:00 PM

lurker on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Clive, All, re putting phones in the freezer

A local anti-vaxxer who heckled our PM had his home searched on a related matter. Police allegedly found inside a chest freezer a cellphone and a laptop, both wrapped in Al foil …

December 3, 2021 2:50 PM

Ted on Apple Sues NSO Group :

@Clive

Re: Apple v. NSO podcast

Much appreciation for your response. The release of the podcast at about the same time Reuters released their article on US State Dept phones being hacked by NSO spyware is a little like ships crossing in the night.

So yes I suspect that Apple will be alowed to procead against NSO

Well, all law arguments aside, I’m kind of glad you think so.

https://www.reuters.com/technology/exclusive-us-state-department-phones-hacked-with-israeli-company-spyware-sources-2021-12-03/...

December 3, 2021 2:36 PM

Jesse Thompson on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Bruce

The basic problem is that the code is the ultimate authority — there is no adjudication protocol — so if there’s a vulnerability in the code, there is no recourse. And, of course, there are lots of vulnerabilities in code.
[…]
Human-based adjudication systems are not useless pre-Internet human baggage, they’re vital.

But here’s the rub: Human-based adjudication systems already ARE code (with their own inexorable vulnerabilities). It’s just a legal or a procedural code for people to follow, instead of machine code for machines to follow...

December 3, 2021 2:24 PM

Clive Robinson on Apple Sues NSO Group :

@ Ted,

Essentially Kerr and Lubin seem to be saying that NSO’s attacks are against the end-users, where Apple has no jurisdiction.

When it comes to Kerr I’ve read enough to know that I would “approach with caution”.

But lets look at it from a distance, does it matter if Apple have standing or not in one small part of the bigger picture?

The question is do they have standing as a legal entity? (which I rather suspect they do). Is there actually any reason why Apple can not “stand” for one or all users of it’s products? I suspect not if it becomes a “class action” on the users behalf…...

December 3, 2021 2:04 PM

Bear on Testing Faraday Cages :

This is a topic about which there is no shortage of misinformation.

First there are a lot of people who want to appear knowledgeable. More than that they want to believe themselves knowledgeable. They want to believe that they are in control of the situation, so they believe that the things they have come up with will work.

Second, there is moderate difficulty in testing claims. Not severe difficulty, but sufficient to mean that claims made without testing evidence are usually unchallenged. And, people usually don’t test their own “home remedies” either, partly because they prefer not to learn that they aren’t (yet) in control of the situation...

December 3, 2021 1:42 PM

Clive Robinson on Testing Faraday Cages :

@ Jordan Brown,

How tightly do you have to wrap it around your head? Do you have to shave off your hair?

Well actually you do not want it,

1, To touch your head.
2, Have any gaps.

Whilst you could use a metal bin / trash can for the first requirment.

The second kind of means not so much the shaving of hair, but the need to cut off the head at the neck. Which lets be honest could be,

1, Counter productive...

December 3, 2021 1:41 PM

Winter on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@jon
” There is no such thing as “natural law”.”

Then there are no crimes against humanity, or war crimes, or unjust laws. There is only national law.

Also any legal system has to be founded upon “self-evident truths”, as you cannot prescribe each and every concept.

Natural Law has been discussed for centuries by legal scholars and is at the foundation of, e.g., the US constitution. I myself would hesitate to declare it nonsense just because I do not see the point...

December 3, 2021 1:36 PM

Clive Robinson on Testing Faraday Cages :

@ Ted, ALL,

Is this a good example of a fractal antenna?

There are “fractal antennas” that look like that “decoration”. In fact one of the first demonstrated did look very similar.

However you would have to test it to know for sure.

But my keen eye suggests it is “unlikely” to be an effective “fractal antenna”…

Why, because it’s not actually a fractal as such. If you look at the “limbs” you will see the wires are not parallel but taper being quite wide in the center and quite fine towards the tip. Kind of like the outline of a star. This would probably not provide a very good impedence against frequency profile...

December 3, 2021 1:15 PM

Clive Robinson on Testing Faraday Cages :

@ Ted, Matt Blaze, ALL,

Which almost goes to show that one would really need to test everything.

Importantly “at all frequencies” not just a tiny number of “spot frequencies”.

One of the reasons EMC test houses use prober spectrum analysers is that they contain “tracking generators” that make such all frequency testing relatively painless.

It’s something I do from time to time and I’ve access to a proper test TEM Cell / RF anechoic chamber that is about the size of a “white van” of the Ford Transit variety...

December 3, 2021 1:06 PM

Clive Robinson on Testing Faraday Cages :

@ Marc, ALL,

Has this malware been found? Does it have a name? Has anybody else been able to reproduce these findings and publish results? On modern hardware?

The answer to all your questions is effectively “Yes”.

Only what you are chosing to call “malware” is actually part of the underlying phone standards going back before mobile phones as you know them existed.

I’ve pointed this out several times over the years on this blog, and for some reason it keeps getting asked…...

December 3, 2021 12:55 PM

Ted on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Clive, Who?, Winter

Re: Microwaves and…

However at other frequencies that transmission line will take the EM energy out to the door edge where it will be a “slot antenna” and it will radiate outwards quite effectively.

Fascinating. Which almost goes to show that one would really need to test everything. The unknown unknowns are the worst.

December 3, 2021 12:48 PM

A Dummy on Testing Faraday Cages :

what about copper tape for shielding guitar electronics cavities?

better than al foil?

top dog for cheap?

December 3, 2021 12:43 PM

Ted on Apple Sues NSO Group :

I am so confused by this lawyerly review of Apple v. NSO Group

The first minute of the Lawfare podcast gives some insight into the direction of the conversation. Essentially Kerr and Lubin seem to be saying that NSO’s attacks are against the end-users, where Apple has no jurisdiction.

But the 22-page complaint by Apple does not seem to support this. As we discussed before, the jurisdiction of the complaint seems to be based on the attacks of Apple’s software and servers in CA...

December 3, 2021 12:27 PM

Clive Robinson on Testing Faraday Cages :

@ Who?, Ted, Winter,

What about putting multiple layers of aluminum foil inside a box and even protect it with something hard like polycarbonate sheets to make it more resistant to multiple uses?

Ask yourself the question,

“Where does the energy go?”

If you think about it, “wave guide” is a box lined with metal, it very efficiently transports the energy from one end to the other.

Then think about a microwave oven, it is a metal box at the end of a short piece of waveguide with a magnetron at the other dumping between 0.5-1.5kW of power into the system...

December 3, 2021 12:15 PM

Jon on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@ “Natural Law”

Yes, some agreements do not need to be written down to be enforced, but then adjudication of “Who said what” becomes a game of “He said, She said” in very short order. Thus the idea of a “witness” (presumably unbiased) who can credibly say, “Yep, they’re married” (or not).

Note that even writing it down doesn’t solve this problem. Lawyers have, since the invention of their profession (and, I imagine, writing), been arguing about “What do those words written down mean?”. For example, a law beginning “Any person” can be argued right off the bat, “What is a person? Is a slave a person? Is a corporation a person?” &c...

December 3, 2021 11:41 AM

Z.Lozinski on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Who,

One of the key points on the old Ricochet network at California was that it worked at 900 MHz. [..] A similar 5G-like setup would have required tens of access points placed everywhere.

No.

5G is frequency independent, it is designed to be used in multiple bands from 450MHz, 900Mhz all the way up to 27 Ghz. And there are people working on 66Ghz.

5G in the 900MHz band would have the same coverage area and the same in-building penetratoon as 2G in 900MHz...

December 3, 2021 11:39 AM

Cassandra on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Clive Robinson
@Winter

If it’s not written down it never happened

Which, amongst other things, is the key to infiltration/takeover of organisations. The most important position on a committee is not the chairman, but the secretary, because it is the secretary that writes down what happened and what the documented truth should be. It is difficult to argue with the minutes.

Terry Gillam examined this in the film Brazil, which draws heavily on Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four. History is written by the winners, and revised by whoever is currently in power...

December 3, 2021 11:14 AM

Marc on Testing Faraday Cages :

Can a cell phone be located when turned off?

Apple says iOS 15 can and does. I believe this.

In 2013 the NSA said that it can track a phone that is turned off. “allegedly” and “reportedly” have been used in all the articles I could find. Some articles mentioned infecting target devices with malware. This is now eight years ago. Has this malware been found? Does it have a name? Has anybody else been able to reproduce these findings and publish results? On modern hardware? I found an article that made a mention of a Nextel phone. That’s at least 16 years ago...

December 3, 2021 11:12 AM

JImbo on Testing Faraday Cages :

I would think you can test by calling the phone from another phone. First verify reception by calling the unprotected phone. If it rings, then protected with whatever method you choose and call it again. If it doesn’t ring you have some protection?

December 3, 2021 10:54 AM

aron on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

It should have more properly been reported as security researchers collecting a $31 million bug bounty.

I’ve been saying for years, the innovation of cryptocurrency was not in cryptography nor currency, but in game-theoretic incentives. Chaum had already figured out digital cash, and many people had worked on distributed networks. Such networks would be fair if they had one vote per person (i.e., if we guarded against Sybil attacks, perhaps by having governments issue anonymous ballots)...

December 3, 2021 10:34 AM

Ted on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Winter

And the phone part is controlled from the cell tower.

Oh. Eew. Thank you. 👍

December 3, 2021 10:26 AM

Jordan Brown on Testing Faraday Cages :

Does aluminum foil work as well as tin foil?

How tightly do you have to wrap it around your head? Do you have to shave off your hair?

December 3, 2021 10:24 AM

Winter on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Ted
“Not quite sure I follow. Could you explain more?”

A mobile phone consist of two computers. The part that connects to the cell tower and handles calls and messages and the part that acts like a user computer and installs the apps etc.

The part that controls the calls and the messaging works independently from the user computer part. It is a much simpler type of computer. But it also can control what the computer part does and read out its memory...

December 3, 2021 10:04 AM

Winter on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Clive
“An unwritten contract is not worth the paper it is written on.”

Laws, like literature, predate writing by a large margin. Contracts also predate writing. Even now, a verbal contract, with witnesses, is legally binding in the Netherlands. Not to say that this produces difficulties when trying to enforce it. But the law specifically allows such contracts.

It is why you have witnesses at a marriage...

December 3, 2021 10:01 AM

Ted on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Winter

The “phone part” controls the computer part

Not quite sure I follow. Could you explain more?

@Who?

What about putting multiple layers of aluminum foil inside a box and even protect it with something hard like polycarbonate sheets to make it more resistant to multiple uses?

It looks like Matt tested three commercial pouches and three makeshift pouches. The makeshift pouches were: 1) Electrostatic and Mylar Bags, 2) Metal Cookie Tin, and 3) Heavy Duty Aluminum Foil. Each had varying degrees of effectiveness...

December 3, 2021 9:50 AM

Clive Robinson on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@ Winter,

I have seen people argue that you have an unwritten constitution.

More fool them, they can not even plead they do not understand,

An unwritten contract is not worth the paper it is written on.

As was taught to me about “log books” for both science and engineering research,

If it’s not written down it never happened

December 3, 2021 9:44 AM

Who? on Testing Faraday Cages :

@ Matt Blaze

[wrt 5G networks] “It is possible that the containers tested here perform similarly at those frequences, but it’s also possible that they would do much worse.”

On the contrary, I think they will perform much better. One of the key points on the old Ricochet network at California was that it worked at 900 MHz. At that low frequency, a single pole-top access point was able to reach a lot of places and pass through multiple walls. A similar 5G-like setup would have required tens of access points placed everywhere...

December 3, 2021 9:41 AM

Clive Robinson on Testing Faraday Cages :

Have we not been through this just a short while ago?

One reason aluminum foil is not as effective as it could be is “slot antennas” and “Fractal Antennas” as I’ve mentioned before.

In fact without care it is extraordinarily easy to turn a sheet of aluminum foil into a slot antenna.

To fold it at the edges you realy should “roll tightly then crush” rather than “fold and crimp”.

Part of the problem is that whilst aluminium as a metal is a good conductor, it’s oxide which easily forms is infact one of the best electrical insulators we have (though it’s thermal conductivity is high). It’s frequently used in high power radio frequency equipment for device mounting...

December 3, 2021 9:31 AM

Who? on Testing Faraday Cages :

@ Winter, Ted

What about putting multiple layers of aluminum foil inside a box and even protect it with something hard like polycarbonate sheets to make it more resistant to multiple uses?

@ Alan

Indeed, turning off a phone makes it look it has 100% attenuation. Reality is odd, however; you do not really “turn off” a smartphone these days, at least without removing the battery.

December 3, 2021 9:30 AM

TimH on Testing Faraday Cages :

Hmm. Does the phone still try to find a cell, so ramps up the PA power to max on ping and flattens the battery?

December 3, 2021 9:26 AM

Winter on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Ted
“Are you 100% sure? The third paragraph mentions that some software/malware could still support signal transmission even when the phone is ‘off.’ ”

The “phone part” controls the computer part, not the other way round. You, as a user, cannot alter the phone related chips without a soldering iron. You can do that from the telecom side.

In practice, this means the phone part can switch the whole phone on and off without user intervention...

December 3, 2021 9:17 AM

c1ue on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

We have had laws and lawyers for hundreds of years. That entire profession of law continues to grow and law codes continue to evolve because both are still clearly insufficient.
Software is much the same way: is software more or less robust than in the past?
I have never seen how combining 2 fundamentally flawed paradigms can somehow yield a better outcome.

December 3, 2021 9:05 AM

Winter on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Clive
“Where I come from there are supposadly no such thing as “unwritten laws” of that kind,”

I have seen people argue that you have an unwritten constitution. But in practice that might be a fairy tale.

December 3, 2021 8:59 AM

Ted on Testing Faraday Cages :

@Alan

On my phone, the power off function gives 100% attenuation.

Are you 100% sure? The third paragraph mentions that some software/malware could still support signal transmission even when the phone is ‘off.’ Matt says that non-removable batteries can compound these issues.

I’ve got extra aluminum foil if you need it😉

December 3, 2021 8:55 AM

Clive Robinson on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@ Winter,

The laws can be unwritten,

Where I come from there are supposadly no such thing as “unwritten laws” of that kind,

There are however the “moores” and “morals” of society and religion. The judgments are generally not formal or binding and the punishments for transgression generally being some form of “distancing” or “exclusion”.

In fact both “unwritten” and “unpublished” laws are an anathema prejudicial to the good order of society with anyone subscribing to them being likewise “struck down” by society...

December 3, 2021 8:48 AM

Alan on Testing Faraday Cages :

On my phone, the power off function gives 100% attenuation.

December 3, 2021 8:32 AM

JonKnowsNothing on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Winter @All

re: AI enabled decision making

A MSM report gave an unintended hint at how such systems are enabled:

During last year’s portion of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic many governments enacted payment methods to help their populations Stay Indoors and Stay Safe. They gave money directly to their populations and they gave money to businesses to fund payrolls (to avoid having everyone hit the unemployment lines)...

December 3, 2021 8:04 AM

Ted on Testing Faraday Cages :

Also, I didn’t ‘know’ that the AirTag can play play a sound. When the tag is wrapped in foil the sound won’t play. The app says “AirTag Not Reachable.”

However, when it’s not wrapped I could get the AirTag to play a sound from at least 30-40 feet.

December 3, 2021 7:30 AM

Winter on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@JonKnowsNothing
“From this pool the AI selects a percentage of tax returns for audit. How that selection happens is a closely held secret.”

This is indeed illegal in the EU under the GDPR. It does happen though.

It happened in the Netherlands and came to light at the start of the year. The “AI” was “AS” and discriminatory. This scandal has caused the biggest political and legal crisis in the Netherlands since the high profile murder of a member of parliament in the early 2000’s...

December 3, 2021 7:19 AM

Ted on Testing Faraday Cages :

Aluminum foil works pretty good for blocking signals. High five!

I just tested it with my Apple AirTags, and voila… the Find My app says “Signal is weak. Try moving to a different location.” This was when I was about a foot away from the tags.

I had to turn my phone off and on and fold/crimp the foil around the tags to lose the signal. But if I ever want to hide my keys from myself, I will know exactly how to do it!!! Happy dance! 🙂...

December 3, 2021 7:00 AM

JonKnowsNothing on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Peter Galbavy, @Cassandra, @All

re: Both the UK Data Protection laws and, to my amateur knowledge, under GDPR, there is a provision to prevent purely automated decisions for certain kinds of transactions – typically those involving personal credit.

There exist systems where “purely automated decisions” exist in many countries, including the UK and EU. The formats are generally held secret and the processes deliberately opaque. They are defined by “a machine algorithm or formula”, the format and criteria are not revealed to the public...

December 3, 2021 6:50 AM

Winter on Testing Faraday Cages :

“although aluminum foil can, under ideal circumstances (that are difficult to replicate) sometimes provide comparable levels of attenuation.”

This is undoubtedly true, but aluminum foil is easily obtained, can protect objects as large as you want, can be double folded to any desired thickness, and can be folded “air tight” if you make an effort. If you want it grounded, that is not that difficult to achieve (if you have a good ground, that is)...

December 3, 2021 4:22 AM

Cassandra on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Peter Galbavy

Nice to see you popping up again. I still have fond memories of Demon.

You make a good point: it is difficult to force people to abide by ‘smart contracts’ if the external legal system says it is not allowed. It is akin to the problem of setting up trusts with conditions that endure beyond the lifetime of the person setting it up: clever lawyers can usually find a creative way of bypassing conditions ( Cy-près doctrine in English law )...

December 3, 2021 3:42 AM

Winter on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Clive
“Sorry there is no such thing as “Natural law”, just the working rules of evolution.”

There is at least one such Natural Law: All societies and communities have laws. The laws can be unwritten, but unwritten laws can be just as deadly as written laws.

For the rest, Natural Law is a research project that tries to find legal systems that wreck the least havoc on humans.

For all the criticism heaped upon the writers of the declaration of independence and the US constitution, it was based on ideas of Natural Law and it was hugely successful (see 2 centuries of history). There have been quite a number of legal systems that were spectacular failures plunging nations into civil war and disaster...

December 3, 2021 3:23 AM

Clive Robinson on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@ Shoal Creek, Jon, Scam Coin, Tom Rollins, Winter, ALL,

Rothbard promoted the idea that a contract is only valid within a code of laws that is based on natural law.

Sorry there is no such thing as “Natural law”, just the working rules of evolution.

In fact “law” or more correctly “legislation” is it’s self an artificial construct of man that comes about due to a failing which as I’ve pointed out before can be sumed up as,...

December 3, 2021 3:11 AM

Winter on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Tom Rollins
“you were wrong before, now you’re just engaging in fantasy”

I have been wrong many times, but that does not make you right. And QAnon remains a murderous horror fantasy if you paste it unto another group.

December 3, 2021 1:48 AM

Peter Galbavy on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

This is simply another example of “Computer says no” – a catchphrase that should be familiar to anyone in the UK – or rather in Little Britain. Fancy foreigners head to YouTube.

Both the UK Data Protection laws and, to my amateur knowledge, under GDPR, there is a provision to prevent purely automated decisions for certain kinds of transactions – typically those involving personal credit.

...

December 3, 2021 1:46 AM

Winter on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Jon
“Is there a fundamental right to an abortion?”

Is there a fundamental right to life? The integrity of our body? Freedom of speech? Religion? Can you own things? Is slavery acceptable? Torture? Do you have a right to a trial?

There are many things we consider bad in, say the legal system in North Korea. Why would the legal system of North Korea be worse than that of Switzerland or Iceland? If you consider all laws to be equal, then there is no difference in quality...

December 3, 2021 1:39 AM

Jon on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@ Winter

Which is basically to say it’s highly fuzzy nonsense. For example, in your very quotation ‘with certain’ and ‘among which’?

So what others are in there? Can we decide which to put in, and which to take out?

Is there a fundamental right to an abortion? Is that in conflict with the right to Life for a zygote? And given ‘endowed by their Creator(s)’ that would be the sperm donor and the egg donor – do they both have equal rights? Does having sex (including rape) create rights?...

December 3, 2021 12:40 AM

Winter on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@jon
“And just what is “natural law”?”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_law

It is a branch of law studies. The idea that all humans share needs and desires which should be reflected in good legal systems is not unreasonable.

The following phrase is an example of the ideas in “Natural Law”:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of happiness. ...

December 3, 2021 12:31 AM

Winter on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Shoal
“If so, you have contradicted yourself, as Rothbard promoted the idea that a contract is only valid within a code of laws that is based on natural law.”

That is a very reasonable point of view, depending on what you consider natural law (probably his only reasonable view). Obviously, the existence of laws is a problem for Libertarians as you are born into a world of laws which are limiting your freedom without you having had any say in it. Natural law is a good escape route here...

December 3, 2021 12:09 AM

Winter on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

@Moderator
comment-395390
comment-395391

Someone posting the same thing twice under different handles. Cryptic content, but names point to anti-vaxxer talking points. All in all this looks like the troll tool active earlier this year.

December 2, 2021 11:08 PM

lurker on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

@SpaceLifeForm: My Faraday Bag broke

That’s what you get if you insist on 7G and HyperSpace frequencies. I was once involved in construction of a Faraday Cage, a real cage of insect screen inside and out on a 7 foot cube made of 4×2″ timber. There was a fancy multistage filter where the mains went thru. The purpose of the cage was for testing HF receivers (below 30Mhz.) to spec in an environment full of industrial noise and random transmitters...

December 2, 2021 9:28 PM

Scam Coin on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

@Winter writes, “There is a reason, arbitration would involve people. And people are corrupt and under the rule of the State. The whole point of “block chain” is that you can do away with (other) people.”

Exactly. That’s the joke, that’s the scam. Because of course you can’t get rid of other people. Someone wrote the code, someone audited the code, someone hosted the site, someone provided the encryption, etc and etc...

December 2, 2021 8:56 PM

Considerthisplease on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

Hey y’all, America seems to be losing a health security battle here(!):

http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/images/data/county-level-prevelance.png
i.pinimg.com/736x/df/c0/aa/dfc0aa408272b385492072e68128a9fd.jpg
http://www.childhealthdata.org/App_Themes/Main/Images/StateRankingMaps/NOM17.3_Autism.jpg
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/images/ADDM-network-map-Dec2018.png
tacanow.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ADDM-Tracking-Sites-2016-1024×569.jpg ...

December 2, 2021 5:49 PM

ResearcherZero on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

Victims of abduction and child abuse have one of the highest death and disappearance rates, often before anyone is successfully prosecuted. Even with the entire recording of the planning of the crime, it may not have been admissible evidence.

December 2, 2021 5:39 PM

ResearcherZero on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

Once a lot of stuff couldn’t be used in court, but that has been improved upon quite a bit. You could collect evidence of planning serious crimes, but then be forced to wait for the crooks to commit the physical act. When it came to abductions and other acts of violent or malicious behavior, that was quite a problem, especially crimes against minors as often the details are then suppressed by the court which would leave the victims still vulnerable...

December 2, 2021 5:36 PM

Ted on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

@SpaceLifeForm, Clive

Re: Paper is safer.

From your mouth god’s ears. Plus there is so much regulation around some industries, like ‘regular’ finance, where others are practically in a state of undress.

I’m still thinking about MonoX here.

The firm that audited MonoX, Halbourne Security, was co-founded by a guy who actually teaches Blockchain And Smart Contract Security at SANS. I hope his company releases a further analysis of what happened with MonoX, but I don’t know if that’s something they can do...

December 2, 2021 5:25 PM

ResearcherZero on Proposed UK Law Bans Default Passwords :

@bassman1805

The local restaurants and cafes all have better security than the many of the state government departments. Important departments too, ones that handle finances, and the kinds of departments that may contain important information.

Hopefully other countries will follow the UK with their own laws, and there will be further improvements to these laws. There are some government security laws, but little governing consumer products...

December 2, 2021 5:05 PM

JonKnowsNothing on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

@ Winter, @Clive, @All

re:

W: Please find information about what data the FBI can legally access in various messaging apps

C: It rather depends on what you mean by “legally”.

As a simple rule of thumb, “Anything any one freely gives them, or that they can see when in some place, they are alowed to be”

To expand a bit on what is externally viewable. People do not look “far enough” to learn what can be legally seen. They often presume it’s just the few feet around themselves...

December 2, 2021 4:35 PM

ResearcherZero on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

ASAT missiles could obliterate NATO satellites and “blind all their missiles, planes and ships, not to mention the ground forces,” said Russian Channel One TV host Dmitry Kiselyov, rendering the West’s GPS-guided missiles useless. “It means that if NATO crosses our red line, it risks losing all 32 of its GPS satellites at once.”
https://www.gpsworld.com/russia-issues-threat-to-gps-satellites/...

December 2, 2021 4:23 PM

SpaceLifeForm on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

@ Ted, Clive

re https://xkcd.com/221/ and software contracts

The specfication was garbage.

The programmer wrote the code to meet the spec, but there is another issue.

As defined in the code, it is an integer function that ALWAYS returns a Random number.

It is an IMPLIED Software contract.

Some programmer, reading the DOCUMENTATION, and the SPECIFICATION, could conclude that they can call this function from their code, and that it WILL NEVER FAIL...

December 2, 2021 4:17 PM

Cassandra on Smart Contract Bug Results in $31 Million Loss :

On review, it seems like a previous comment that mentioned Karl Marx, Rosa Luxemburg, Ayn Rand and Murray Rothbard, Accelerando by Charles Stross, and an article by Andrew Odlyzko on the South Sea Bubble, referencing Charles Mackay’s 1841 Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, has been held up in moderation. This means my correction doesn’t make sense. Sorry.

Cassandra

...

December 2, 2021 4:13 PM

lurker on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

@Winter: They all worked, and they were all effective.

Indeed they did, but some are appearing to work better[1] than others. In a free market economy doesn’t the customer have a right to choose what he believes is best? And then there’s the aspect that threatened to get me labelled “vaccine hesistant”:

@Freezing in Brazil: I am referring to the potential long term side effects of the mRNA vaccines,...

December 2, 2021 4:06 PM

6449-225 on Friday Squid Blogging: Bobtail Squid and Vibrio Bacteria :

@ Ted @ SpaceLifeForm @Winter @ Clive Robinson

Re: Reuleaux triangles

The Wiki article points out that certain points in the triangle trace piecewise elliptical curves as the triangle rolls inside a square. Gives one to wonder if there is some kind of Reuleaux version of Ptolemaic epicycles.

I’ll go quietly …

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.