Palantir's Surveillance Service for Law Enforcement

Motherboard got its hands on Palantir's Gotham user's manual, which is used by the police to get information on people:

The Palantir user guide shows that police can start with almost no information about a person of interest and instantly know extremely intimate details about their lives. The capabilities are staggering, according to the guide:

  • If police have a name that's associated with a license plate, they can use automatic license plate reader data to find out where they've been, and when they've been there. This can give a complete account of where someone has driven over any time period.

  • With a name, police can also find a person's email address, phone numbers, current and previous addresses, bank accounts, social security number(s), business relationships, family relationships, and license information like height, weight, and eye color, as long as it's in the agency's database.

  • The software can map out a person's family members and business associates of a suspect, and theoretically, find the above information about them, too.

All of this information is aggregated and synthesized in a way that gives law enforcement nearly omniscient knowledge over any suspect they decide to surveil.

Read the whole article -- it has a lot of details. This seems like a commercial version of the NSA's XKEYSCORE.

Boing Boing post.

Meanwhile:

The FBI wants to gather more information from social media. Today, it issued a call for contracts for a new social media monitoring tool. According to a request-for-proposals (RFP), it's looking for an "early alerting tool" that would help it monitor terrorist groups, domestic threats, criminal activity and the like.

The tool would provide the FBI with access to the full social media profiles of persons-of-interest. That could include information like user IDs, emails, IP addresses and telephone numbers. The tool would also allow the FBI to track people based on location, enable persistent keyword monitoring and provide access to personal social media history. According to the RFP, "The mission-critical exploitation of social media will enable the Bureau to detect, disrupt, and investigate an ever growing diverse range of threats to U.S. National interests."

Posted on July 15, 2019 at 6:12 AM • 62 Comments

Comments

EdJuly 15, 2019 7:29 AM

A great irony here is that Peter Thiel regularly gets dubbed Silicon Valley’s most prominent libertarian.

WinterJuly 15, 2019 8:12 AM

"A great irony here is that Peter Thiel regularly gets dubbed Silicon Valley’s most prominent libertarian."

It is my experience that Libertarians quite often do not fight for other people's freedom. Especially not other people who are not like themselves.

However, Libertarianism requires policing. If you dive deep into Libertarianism, it becomes clear that it requires a strong LEO force to prevent being overrun by organized non-Libertarians.

You can only be free when others are forced to obey the law.

WinterJuly 15, 2019 8:21 AM

IIRC Cory Doctorow argued that more inequality requires more law enforcement to uphold. Technology makes enforcing inequality more easy, so more advanced technology leads to cheaper, and more extreme, wealth inequality.

Finding people who are planing a change of the current order is the first, and most difficult/expensive step in this enforcement.

The technology described can easily be interpreted as part of this trend. Inequality in the USA is already pretty extreme, and growing. Enforcing it becomes more expensive, unless the TLAs can automate the job.

TatütataJuly 15, 2019 8:27 AM

... to U.S. National interests.

The RFP is actually looking for a "contractor", and not simply a tool as characterised in the blurb above:

The purpose of this procurement is to acquire the services of a company to proactively identify and reactively monitor threats to the United States and its interests through a means of online sources. A subscription to this service shall grant the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) access to tools that will allow for the exploitation of lawfully collected/acquired data from social media platforms that will be stored, vetted and formatted by a vendor. The mission-critical exploitation of social media will enable the Bureau to detect, disrupt, and investigate an ever growing diverse range of threats to U.S. National interests.

I.e., "law enforcement" is privatised. Who will be the lucky winner? There is an obvious direct connection to item #1 above (Palantir and co.)...

J. Edgar must be drooling in his grave... A system that lets you collect shit on everyone under the pretext of "national" interest.

"Proactively identify": If you want to start a union in a big-box chain or think Keystone XL isn't a good idea, then we'll have enough of ancillary shit in store to shut you down. Mama doesn't have the right piece of paper? We'll keep you so busy with immigration that you won't have time for that kind of crap ...

The trick is who gets to define what the FR, UK, AU, CA, RU, DE, US, et cætera, "national interest" is. Don't hesitate to use a bit of solemn flag waving by pompous fools and you're done.

an ever growing diverse range of threats

I remember press conferences from when I was a kid where police departments demanded governments to grant them "new" powers to combat "new" threats. It was always basically the same old song but with the gang du jour inserted at the appropriate place.

gordoJuly 15, 2019 9:09 AM

The opposition-research community will have a field day with these kinds of data and these kinds of tools.

Those who can afford to, however, will pay people to scrub their data trails; that, or pay extra as part of terms-of-service agreements for non-disclosure, if not outright deletion.

ATNJuly 15, 2019 9:11 AM

Tatütata
... services of a company ... FR, UK, ..., DE

I wonder what this company would reply to a GDPR request to "Personal data of the individual" in the EU?
I am not sure you can ask for GDPR to governments, but to companies... Maybe you get a 35 tons lorry of paper delivered at your address, to teach you never to do it again... or you are immediately classified as terrorist in all their databases.

TatütataJuly 15, 2019 9:40 AM

I wonder what this company would reply to a GDPR request to "Personal data of the individual" in the EU?

Interesting question.

Before the GDPR, activists such as Max Schrems dragged the GAFAs before courts, and effectively received truckloads of data.

I initially couldn't remember Schrems name, and had to look him up in Der Standard and the Süddeutsche Zeitung. I came across this recent item from 9 July, Schrems vs. Facebook -- Der nächste Daten-Deal mit den USA steht auf der Kippe.

English description: The proposed data safe-harbour agreement between the EU and the USA is endangered. The European Court of Justice just declared that the agreement signed 4 years ago to be not in conformity with EU data protection regulations:

Anlass dieser Klage sind erneut die weitreichenden Abhör-Befugnisse der US-Geheimdienste, die der Whistleblower Edward Snowden enthüllt hatte.

EN:

The basis for this lawsuit are again the wide-ranging wiretap powers of US secret services which were revealed by the whistle-blower Edward Snowden.

According to the article, the US government's lawyer argued that surveillance is a "good thing" for the safety of American and EU-citizens. Facebook's counsel put forward similar arguments, which prompted the Austrian representative to ask sarcastically whether "Facebook considered itself to be an NSA subsidiary".

There aren't only US corporations out there. Will the FBI try to enlist VK, OK.ru, Baidu and co. in their efforts? Or will they be coopted without their consent? And what moral authority is left with the US?

ericJuly 15, 2019 10:01 AM

The only way to have the multicultural, borderless, globalist, secular/athiest, socialist, post-nation state utopian society that everybody wants is to enforce all of this non-natural stuff (like forced multicultural integration) via a police state.

The only way a police state can operate is by being over-informed; i.e., by having more information than anyone else, and critically, more information than you think they have.

But that's what everyone wanted. At least that's what we're told.

For some reason no one seems to be able or willing to connect the causal dots. Perhaps instead of trying to change human beings in order to corral them into an ideal society, we ought to start designing political systems that accommodate the realities of human nature. Socialism and other collective/redistributive forms of economic and political organization only work in places with high social capital, which means, cultural homogeneity. This is easily observable from a survey of where it currently works best -- northern Europe and especially Scandinavia.


WinterJuly 15, 2019 10:17 AM

"The only way to have the multicultural, borderless, globalist, secular/athiest, socialist, post-nation state utopian society that everybody wants is to enforce all of this non-natural stuff (like forced multicultural integration) via a police state."

This is in itself contradictory. A police state is never borderless, nor is it any of the other adjectives.

The USA is none of these things, nor are Saudi Arabia or China. The accountability of the police goes from bad to worse in these three (the police are above the law) and they can be considered "police states" to a varying degree.

So, it seems you are rambling on to make some ideological point.

ericJuly 15, 2019 11:40 AM

@Winter This is in itself contradictory. A police state is never borderless

A global police state would by definition be borderless. The rest of the description is equally apt, especially if you consider trends.


vas pupJuly 15, 2019 12:35 PM

@Winter stated:"You can only be free when others are forced to obey the law." Good point!
Only when law is just for the most of population, not either for wealthy 1% or aggressive minorities trying to impose on the rest of population their views by violence thinking that they are above the law. I do not like people who attempt to impose on others their ideas. I may not share any ideas or even dislike them to the core, but libertarianism as I understand it stands for anybody's right for dissent and not be target of violence for that.

Ideas should be fought by ideas, but violence - by law enforcement to the full extend primary with less-than-lethal tools.


@all: the more intrusive tools you provide for law enforcement agencies for their LEGITIMATE tasks (not being Thought Police), more stronger should be procedure of their utilization and real oversight mechanism of usage.

My main concern is when LEAs did not see blurring line between utilization of those tools for criminal intelligence information gathering and gathering information for future utilization as evidence in the court of law.

CasandraJuly 15, 2019 3:54 PM

I think we have roughly a generation before we have a solid police state that will offer total information control over the population.

SofakinbdJuly 15, 2019 3:55 PM

Thiel is in the news a lot today:
Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should probe Google

Number one, how many foreign intelligence agencies have infiltrated your Manhattan Project for AI?

Number two, does Google’s senior management consider itself to have been thoroughly infiltrated by Chinese intelligence?

Number three, is it because they consider themselves to be so thoroughly infiltrated that they have engaged in the seemingly treasonous decision to work with the Chinese military and not with the US military… because they are making the sort of bad, short-term rationalistic [decision] that if the technology doesn’t go out the front door, it gets stolen out the backdoor anyway?

- Sofa

Within Seven SevensJuly 15, 2019 5:11 PM

Sofa,
Pressure on Thiel so he deflects to other Mass Surveillance Co-Conspirators!

Thiel makes valid points as I’ve never considered Google an American company when the 2010 census indicated that the majority of Google data-miners are foreign nationals.
With Google and Facebook worldwide dragnet of deep sea cables they can own the data for entire continents (starting with totally dependent Africa) thus leaving national governments powerless.
Facebook, Google, Huawei and CCP Belt African projects are a natural synergistic fit. [1] Its reasonable clear they will join forces to rule humanity.

Ironically our blinded Congress is voting to give foreign nationals the ultimate power to enforce private corporate policies to rule over Americans as constitutional laws are pushed aside as irrelevant.
This is also why Mr. Thiel is upset.

Peter Thiel’s implicit argument is if someone’s going to spy on Americans then let it at least be Americans.

Background: Hitting Home
The OpenPower Foundation -- a nonprofit led by Google and IBM executives with the aim of trying to "drive innovation" -- has set up a collaboration between IBM, Chinese company Semptian, and U.S. chip manufacturer Xilinx. Together, they have worked to advance a breed of microprocessors that enable computers to analyze vast amounts of data more efficiently. Shenzhen-based Semptian is using the devices to enhance the capabilities of internet surveillance and censorship technology it provides to human rights-abusing security agencies in China, according to sources and documents. A company employee said that its technology is being used to covertly monitor the internet activity of 200 million people...
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/07/15/0132215/how-americas-tech-giants-are-helping-build-chinas-surveillance-state

“This is not a road map for a smart city, it’s an assault on our democracy,” he wrote in an email to the Guardian.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/24/google-toronto-smart-city-sidewalk-project-alphabet-redevelopment

Google is threatening to fire employees in a crackdown on leaks about 'need to know' projects
https://www.businessinsider.com/google-executives-clamping-down-on-internal-information-2019-5\

Google followed by Facebook are the behemoths of submarine cables with global investments in 22 cable systems over the last 10 years:
https://www.submarinenetworks.com/en/insights/ott-led-subsea-sunrise-in-africa-equiano-and-simba

[1] Only the American troublemakers are complaining /s

A90210July 15, 2019 5:24 PM

@Sofakinbd

"Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should probe Google"

That makes more sense than 'Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA
should probe
Palantir'

A90210July 15, 2019 6:01 PM

@sil started a discussion of this topic on this weeks' squid https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2019/07/friday_squid_bl_682.html#c6795696

with posts also from 65535, Clive Robinson, Vinny G, Ergo Sum, Alex Security, Maxwell's Daemon

There @Gordo wrote

" For marketing purposes, call it "SAFE (Situational [or Social] Awareness For Everyone)" because, of course, it's not.

How about, TIAC (Total Information Awareness Corp.)

Shades of laundering Pointdexter's TIA through a corporation. Perhaps, more palatable, deniable, etc, for residents in the United States of Amnesia (USA).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_Information_Awareness TIA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBmAPYkPeYU
Suspicious Mind - Elvis Presley

RachelJuly 15, 2019 6:30 PM

As Mr Robinson pointed out in this weeks Squid - Palantir is for everybody except Peter Thiel and his mates ( people like Tim Ferriss, who hangs out with people like ex-General, Stanley McChrystal)

Petre Peter July 15, 2019 7:17 PM

mass surveillance used to be done through religion, now is done religiously.

name.withheld.for.obvious.reasonsJuly 15, 2019 11:50 PM

Not sure if this is more of a trolling expedition, but just to clarify the language. This is not a personal attack, it is an observation and some feedback to the authors (check your jets where necessary).

@Eric, @winter

Respecting scoping of a police state, Global is a bounded definition of the extent of this apparatus. When we get solar system wide policing let me know, we are bordered by the sphere we're on.

@all
This is where the discussion is disarming, we are in an existential (hate the word, very loaded) schism between two systems of population management (forget political systems, they're all but dead). WeChat, and some other, say Arsebook, for dominance in managing the "transactional human space" (and forget humanity, we are transactionalized).

Wondering what all the actors are up to, Palantir or other miscreants, takes time and they will attempt to fill spaces in this atmosphere. Death by thousands of bits. The problem is we have not defined the space, the constraints, or the behaviors that constitute a "common" understanding. Privacy is being subjected to pressure, the push to relinquish any sense of it is lost if we do not address all the beneficiaries of this captive environment. And, our description of privacy is woefully inadequate.

Damien MatthewsJuly 16, 2019 2:02 AM

Anyone interested in seeing a practical example of the enormous volume of information readily accessible to law enforcement need only examine the many hundreds of pages of police records released by court order in the Jussie Smollett case. They were released as court records, not police records... otherwise you would never see them, and they contain *everything* about the guy and his friends. The volume of information is staggering.

Chicago Police Department has a "SOMEX" or "Social Media Exploitation" team. They, too, were sic'd on Smollett and they came up with a similarly tremendous amount of (useful) information. All of it is in the records that were released, albeit with redactions.

WinterJuly 16, 2019 2:37 AM

@eric
"A global police state would by definition be borderless. The rest of the description is equally apt, especially if you consider trends."

A global super state is inconceivable within our lifetime. All high population states (China, India, Indonesia, Russia, USA) are under constant threat of disintegration even though they are far from global.

This "global police state" is a boogeyman from people that want to break up their own country.

Clive RobinsonJuly 16, 2019 7:01 AM

@ Damien Matthews,

Chicago Police Department has a "SOMEX" or "Social Media Exploitation" team. They, too, were sic'd on Smollett and they came up with a similarly tremendous amount of (useful) information.

You have to remember this is the same Chicago Police, who were caught with a "black site" detention center where people of either a certain ethnicity or low on the socioeconomic scale or both were "disappeared" and subjected to various forms of "enhanced interogation"...

Chicago Police and the Mayor's office where it appears from voting known to just about everyone there, to have very level sof corruption.

The statistics say that the clearup on homicide was less than one in five, likewise many found guilty are later shown to be compleatly innocent and something like 600,000,000USD has been handed out as compensation over the past decade and a half. All of this is the result of a "Political hard on crime" stance which in reality worked as a system to turn innocent and vulnerable individuals into criminals by known to be corrupt cops bearing false witness etc.

Then a near six foot tall black woman Kim Foxx got voted in causeing the leaders of part of this corrupt policing system to get kicked out. And there to be a major change in focus not on making the bottom of society into criminals but actually trying to focus on the more serious crimes and clearing out the endemic corruption.

Terence Campbell, a defense attorney in Chicago, has said he saw a difference within weeks of Kim Foxx’s arrival,

    “Where the state’s attorney’s office under the former administration had been reluctant to do the right thing for a long time, Kim Foxx did, soon after she came into office.”

As far as Terence Campbell and other prosecuters are concerned, she is,

    “turning the state’s attorney’s office in the right direction. That office is a massive institution. To try and change the culture when there are so many people who have been there for so long, who have their own fiefdoms—it’s a monumental task. Even small turns are good.”

Which has caused considerable "push back" from those who benifit from the previous long running corrupt system. For instance take a look at Kevin W. Graham. He's the president of the Chicago branch of the Fraternal Order of Police (who defended the actions of Jason Van Dyke[1]). He clearly goes out of his way to criticize in any way he can and is one of Foxx’s chief antagonists. He makes things clear with,

    “Our frustration with the state’s attorney’s office didn’t start with Jussie Smollett,”

That is, there is a political vendetta going on that Mayor Rahm Emanuel's office has made worse.

Graham's attitude is,

    “Look, if you have laws on the books, and if you’re not arresting people and you don’t prosecute them, and nobody goes to jail, people have the idea that the laws don’t mean anything.”

But, when you look at what was happening, that statment is an excuse not to actually do the very thing he claims and thus turn back to the old ways... Where you had the corrupt police officers he defends making criminals by making false accusations against people at the bottom of the socioeconomic scale then chasing them for fines they do not have, knowing you push them further down a path to incarceration that they have little or no hope of escaping. That is they are not doing society any good, especially when that involves not investigating more serious crimes such as murder and corruption. Kim Foxx knows that with limited resources priorities have to be made as she notes of her detractors,

    “There is such a lack of nuance, it’s 'hard or soft'. It’s never 'smart'. It’s never ‘strategic’."

As she further and importantly notes scarce resources have to be used wisely,

    "We’ve tried to run an office that is using our resources to deal with those who cause the most harm. What you’ll hear about are those things that we’re not doing, or we’re not prosecuting at the lower end, as though it’s at the expense of, and not the enhancement of, public safety.”

One reason, look at what her detractors are trying to avoid talking about, such as the likes of the work of Prof. Craig Futterman. As a professor of law at the University of Chicago, he well knows about the abuse and corruption of police and how the Mayor Rahm Emanuel's office amongst others fought to keep it covered up. Prof Futterman spent seven years fighting against them for the release of tens of thousands of allegations of misconduct by Chicago police officers. Finally, an Illinois appellate court agreed to the release, in 2015. Prof Futterman credits Kim Foxx with trying to further lift the lid on this. She has made the unprecedented decision to post years of case-by-case data about felony prosecutions on the state’s attorney’s Web site. With as Prof Futterman notes a,

    “dramatic, positive improvement. Until she took charge, everything about that office has been a black hole.”

Prof Futterman further sees the furore and uproar over the Smollett case as the result of opportunism by Kim Foxx's antagonists. Who as mentioned have,

    “an interest in blocking change, in blocking accountability, and in blocking efforts to address mass incarceration and racism within the system.”

Thus the reason this case has received the attention and twists it has is very definitely "Political". The Chicago Police tried the old "Pile it up untill the cave" technique with lots of innuendo or at best partial information released for a "trial by media". Even when dropping what were at best highly questionable charges against Jussie Smollett they still tried to make him appear guilty. In his turn Smollett has maintained he is innocent and refused to play the Chicago Police's game.

The evidence is at best dubious, those who have said they attacked Jussie Smollett also appear to be involved with obtaining "drugs" for him and others and are Nigerian. The Chicago police are known to be corrupt and on repeated occasions find ways of turning people into false witnesses to get convictions.

Thus I suspect the amount of digging the Chicago Detectives have done (over 450 pages) is exceptional rather than even remotely close to normal. That is there is an incentive not to get Jussie Smollett as such but use him as a weapon against Kim Foxx. Thus the further stupid legal action for "overtime" money etc by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who knows without doubt he is next on the list for reformers.

Look at it this way Jussie Smollett had an opportunity to walk away from this, yet he has not and maintains his innocence and has done all along. As a result he now faces a Special Prosecuter who no doubt will be given a carefully crafted set of instructions that will preclude investigating Chicago Police Corruption, or the now becoming more obvious use of the case against Kim Foxx. Because as Prof Futterman noted, there are those that have,

    “an interest in blocking change, in blocking accountability, and in blocking efforts to address mass incarceration and racism within the system.”

Oh and not loosing their position or liberty for their crimes. I guess the minimal incarceration of
Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke for murder[1] is causing a certain degree of nervousness especially as it's widely reported to be the cause of the Mayor not seeking a third term (thus hopefully set the stage to get a replacment who will be sympathetic and not a reformer who will crack down on the corruption).

So yes the whole situation stinks of politics and corruption and very little of justice.

[1] Jason Van Dyke is the white Chicago Police Officer who shot and killed a black teen-ager named Laquan McDonald, as McDonald, seemingly not understanding, walked away from Van Dyke. Kim Foxx's predecessor did not anounce any action against Van Dyke untill forced to. There was a police video that had been sat on that showed the shooting. However at the end of 2015, a judge ordered the release of police video. Thirteen months after the shooting and on the day the video was to be shown it was finally anounced by Kin Foxx's predecessor that Van Dyke would after all face murder charges. Whilst a jury convicted Van Dyke of second-degree murder, sadly a judge sentenced him to in effect a minimal sentence of just less than seven years. Which for obvious reasons has caused increased tension in Chicago between the majority and the Police Force.

VICJuly 16, 2019 9:19 AM

The FBI was warned about the Tsarnaev brothers by Russian authorities who knew exactly what how bad these guys had become. And the FBI did nothing because they could not find any evidence against the brothers.

Except that the Russians had warned the FBI twice that their mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, was a radical extremist.

And that Tamerlan was previously closely connected to a horrific triple homicide in Waltham, MA.

So, it really does not matter if the FBI has a lot of information. Perhaps they do not know how to use it. Perhaps they cannot use it. Perhaps both.

What is not widely recognized is this: at this moment, believe it or not, the United States is relatively stable, but it might not remain so for that much longer. There isn't hysteria about Chinese people, or Algerians, etc. We are not building camps as we did for the Japanese after Pearl Harbor. Hysteria depends on events. Wait until another event happens that causes mass panic and hysteria in the United States. It is going to be the Gestapo on steroids. Think of it as Gestapo 2.0. Taking steps now to make sure that this does not happen makes sense.

If the FBI knew what is was doing--frankly, if anyone actually cared--the OPM leak would not have happened.

Having more and more data that violates our privacy and dignity is not going to help. Using what data they already rightly have, and using it well, should be enough for them to do their jobs. Moreover, turning surveillance tools inward in the U.S. is disturbing, especially with the long list of foreign surveillance failures against the U.S. Perhaps the people who keep dropping the ball while wanting to increase spying on Americans need to be fired. America does not need to resemble East Germany in surveillance and the Keystone Cops in law enforcement. My worry is that the U.S. is going to turn into something we no longer recognize.

RidiculousJuly 16, 2019 9:28 AM

I don't think the general public understands what "persistent keyword monitoring" really means. It's really a computer-assisted version of "A large team of people at the FBI literally reading EVERY SINGLE MESSAGE ON THE WHOLE INTERNET snooping for some crime mentioned that they can go after"...

Right, it's not quite literally that... because that would be too expensive with all the people they'd have to hire... It's "computer assisted" because the computer does the actual reading/monitoring, and when certain keywords are mentioned... like, say "bomb" and "white house" in the same sentence, THEN an agent is alerted and they come investigate and read the message.

Note that I JUST MENTIONED those two key words in the same sentence together. I'm not in any way promoting bombing the white house (oh, I did it again), yet they will come here and read this very message, and investigate me personally for writing this message, as well as you all personally for reading this message, let alone Bruce for hosting this forum (I mean, he must be running a terrorist organization for posts like this to occur, right?) Have fun being investigated!

But nobody seems to care. It's ridiculous!

SlagJuly 16, 2019 10:58 AM

Hah, I remember when that first was proposed back on usenet, and people started putting keywords in their sig files

SpaceLifeFormJuly 16, 2019 4:10 PM

The love of money is the root of all evil.

But Terra Firma does not care about money,
and has no comprende of dinero.

More geologic events coming.

Global warming is causing earthquakes,
and sooner than one would think, volcanoes.

And it will be a runaway situation,
due to methane hydrates.

How did this happen? Fossil fuels. Profit.

Solar, and batteries would be smart.

It's too late now, sorry to say.

Homo Sapiens is not intelligent.


P/KJuly 16, 2019 9:54 PM

This Palantir tool is actually quite different from the NSA's XKEYSCORE system. XKEYSCORE is used for processing and indexing data from raw traffic streams. It's deep packet inspection combined with selection mechanisms. See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XKeyscore

For analysing the data that come up after XKEYSCORE searches and queries, other tools are needed, and maybe the NSA also uses the Palantir tool, or similar ones.

Moonage DaydreamJuly 17, 2019 5:26 AM

Peter Thiel ‘freaks-out’ Google
The search giant’s ties to China were in the spotlight this week after technology investor Peter Thiel suggested on Sunday that the U.S. government probe Google’s “seemingly treasonous” work. President Donald Trump said he wanted the U.S. attorney general to look into the claims.

Miraculous Instantaneous Results
Google said it had moved staff off of Dragonfly, and on Tuesday Karan Bhatia, Google’s policy chief, said the project was “terminated.”
Google’s chief executive officer told U.S. Senator Mark Warner that the company has ended some partnerships in China, the lawmaker said Tuesday on Bloomberg Television.

Naive Politician
Warner, a Democrat from Virginia, didn’t specify what projects he discussed with Google CEO Sundar Pichai. A spokeswoman for the senator said they spoke about a “range of partnerships.”
“I do think there’s some explaining that Google needs to make[1],” Warner said in an interview with Emily Chang on “Bloomberg Technology.” “I’ve met with the Google CEO. He said they are backing out of some of those partnerships, and they’re willing to work with the U.S. government[2].”

“I think that Mr. Thiel and Mr. Trump’s statements are a little over the top,” Warner said[3].
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-07-16/google-backing-out-of-china-partnerships-senator-warner-says?srnd=technology-vp

[1] don’t hold your breath Senator. Google’s privacy comes first

[2] Not true. Most foreign national employees have repeatably been very vocal against working for the US Government. This is understandable as India and China are quite close still share IP. It would also look bad on resumes.

[3] Peter Theil’s precise truthful attack (no doubt based upon Palantir data) was remarkable successful.
However its extremely disappointing in a way; imagine if the US attorney general were to audit Google’s internal data on citizens, projects and under-the-radar sharing of American IP. Oh the horrors!

TatütataJuly 17, 2019 7:56 AM

After I evoked the bureau's infamous head honcho, it became obvious to me that the social vacuuming system should be called "Hoover", especially since it is to be used for "disrupting".

The RFP mentions "U.S. National interests". Wasn't the FBI's role simply to "uphold the law", e.g., FOSTA which is the Mann act reloaded for the 21st century?

One example: The G-Men very much owe their might to this piece of paper invented to police the great unwashed in the Jim Crow and "progressive" era... Imagine what could be done with "Hoover"... Enough to make you mildly nauseous, like the other guy said.

14 July 2019 ......July 17, 2019 9:27 AM

Information about Thiel/Palantir in twitter posts below:
A) https://twitter.com/BarrettBrown_

Barret Brown has his Twitter access modified after writing about Thiel/Palantir
B) https://twitter.com/NatSecGeek/status/1151285759263072256
"Not shut down, but unable to use Twitter more or less

From A):

regarding Thiel/Palantir and ICE raids

https://www.fastcompany.com/90377603/ice-uses-palantir-tech-to-detain-immigrants-wnyc-report

https://www.wnyc.org/story/palantir-directly-powers-ice-workplace-raids-emails-show/

[...]

“In 2011, federal contractor HBGary’s hacked emails revealed Palantir’s involvement, which Barrett Brown went to prison to expose, in retaliatory campaigns against WikiLeaks, labor unions and Think Progress.”

https://truthout.org/articles/peter-thiel-advises-the-president-while-palantir-plays-shadow-cia/

"Palantir Technologies tried to keep a low profile, but with the Wall Street Journal hailing it in 2009 as the “team of geeks who cracked the spy trade,” the firm drew a lot of attention. If providing the software equivalent of a crystal ball to every US spy agency caused Palantir to be regarded as an omen of dystopian portent, there is now more chatter about Peter Thiel, chairman of Palantir, serving as a shadowy special adviser to Trump. Palantir made data-mining sexy and saves the lives of US soldiers, but there are good reasons to ferret out the secrets of the firm and its founder. Palantir’s mission is avowedly to “reduce terrorism” while preserving privacy and civil liberties, but its products in the hands of the Trump regime are a grave threat to both.

When they first met, Trump told Thiel, “You are terrific. We’re friends for life.” Trump identified in Thiel a huge asset for his campaign strategy and for his policy agenda. Trump and Thiel think alike when it comes to the press and immigrants, yet they are both similarly hypocritical in their concern for privacy and litigiousness when they feel violated. Thiel recently bankrolled the lawsuit which bankrupted Gawker, gave a cool million to an anti-immigrant organization in 2008, and gladly provided $1.25 million to Rebekah Mercer’s Trump super PAC, now accused of illegally paying Steve Bannon’s salary. Judging by his ponderous statements about computers, Trump knows nothing whatsoever about technology, so Thiel — as the only adviser other than Bannon from the tech industry — can showcase his libertarian futurist Big Brother vision in the Oval Office, generating more business for Palantir."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrett_Brown


vas pupJuly 17, 2019 1:00 PM

@Clive Robinson • July 16, 2019 7:01 AM

I have strong opinion that judicial branch on State level should be formed in the same way as on Federal level, meaning neither State judges (may be except the lowest level of the court system)nor State prosecutors should be elected by constituents accordingly to their (judiciary) political/party affiliation.

Executive branch nominate them, legislative branch after hearing on each candidate - approve.

It should very strong qualification requirements/prerequisites to candidate related to level of education, and the most important - previous practical experience - minimum 5(five) years of active litigation practice on state or federal level.

Their task is to implement laws, not their own (good or bad - in the eyes of beholder) political agenda. Moreover, in order to be in charge of anything, you should have own first hand knowledge/experience of the subject. Same applied for judicial branch.

I am glad that former Justice of SCOTUS Sandra Day O'Connor promote the same idea, but it seems to me same money taking substantial part in any election are behind blocking implementation of this against reason and common sense.

A90210July 17, 2019 7:49 PM

@Gordo, Tatütata

+1 for renaming Palantir to Hoover. How about Hoover, Inc. (HI or Hi)?

Regarding a typo, my above post should have Gordo's quote read:

" For marketing purposes, call it "SAFE (Situational [or Social] Awareness For Everyone)" because, of course, it's not."

Poll question:

Should Palantir be renamed:

1) SAFE
2) TIAC or Total Information Awareness, Inc.
3) Hoover or hi, etc., see above post by Tatütata
4) none of the above
5) _______________ (your entry)
6) all of the above

GeorgeJuly 18, 2019 12:22 AM

@eric wrote, "A global police state would by definition be borderless. The rest of the description is equally apt, especially if you consider trends."

I think you put too much weight on overt power, which is in contradiction to the post world war 2 geopolitical structure designed by the UK-US coalition (the victors).

The UK-US colation had purposely designed post world war 2 geography into pockets of socio-political conflicts which they can in turn offer a politicing hand. The Russians had other similar ideas but they failed when the iron curtail fell as they lost on the economic front.

Post world war 2 geopolitics purposely rid of cultural homogeneity within borders so a minority power can gain control by enforcing a police state with help from greater foreign powers (namely the US-UK coalition). This carefully architected structure gave way to our current stance in world conflicts and order.

GeorgeJuly 18, 2019 12:44 AM

@P/K,
"For analysing the data that come up after XKEYSCORE searches and queries, other tools are needed, and maybe the NSA also uses the Palantir tool, or similar ones."

On the surface, they appear to be a logical customer of palantir, but I suspect its only for "experimental" reasons.

Tools like palantir work great on data with a predefined "mission purpose" such as analyzing a buying behavior so adverts can better serve their fancy advertisements, but they are not adept at purposes such as "fighting terrorism" which is akin to picking out a needling in a haystack because there could be as little as zero or one needling in a barn of hayes (thats all it took to cause a catastrophe).

Thus, as seen in the advert usage, the tools can be further construed for "behavioral shaping" purposes because it analyzes the input and the outcome to further predict future behavior can identify factors that influence such behavior. This is vastly different from the "fight terror" purpose of the three letter agency systems, unless they don't intend to function as advertised.

GeorgeJuly 18, 2019 1:04 AM

@ridiculous wrote, "I don't think the general public understands what "persistent keyword monitoring" really means. It's really a computer-assisted version of "A large team of people at the FBI literally reading EVERY SINGLE MESSAGE ON THE WHOLE INTERNET snooping for some crime mentioned that they can go after"..."

The "corect" way to do it, as Clive Robinson pointed out, would be to verify each lead with HUMINT on the ground and behind the screens. Thus, such system would have ratings as a feature labelled on each potential leads to have achieve prioritization.

An advert system would not have this fucntion because it can more accurately analyze leads versus clik thrus versus end results based on available data. However, it is not to say such a system cannot be modified in any way shape or form to achive mission purpose of fighting terror but should and probably would be viewed as "experimental" only.

A "police state" does not have the luxury of error when it comes to high profile low frequency crimes. It only takes a needle to slip thru the haystack to render the entire watchdog system catastrophic.

65535July 18, 2019 3:33 PM

@ A90210

"@sil started a discussion of this topic on this weeks' squid https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2019/07/friday_squid_bl_682.html#c6795696
with posts also from 65535, Clive Robinson, Vinny G, Ergo Sum, Alex Security,
Maxwell's Daemon"

Yes, that is correct - we were not the first but did bring it up recently. The sickening subject of Palantir gross perversion of data, skewed data bases and dubious "no fly lists" are all over this blog.

"How about, TIAC (Total Information Awareness Corp.) Shades of laundering Pointdexter's TIA through a corporation. Perhaps, more palatable, deniable, etc, for residents in the United States of Amnesia (USA)."

Yep. I hear you.

@ Rachel

"Palantir is for everybody except Peter Thiel and his mates ( people like Tim Ferriss, who hangs out with people like ex-General, Stanley McChrystal)"

Agreed.

Palantir uses the "one-way mirror" where Palantir [Peter Thiel and gang] collect data, massages, on everybody - but are very careful to delete data on themselves.

Palantir cleverly watches and catalogs the average Jane/Joe - but keeps itself and its employees, customers [including ICE, DHS, FBI and so on] out of view.

This leads to an abusive quasi-military system that is ugly and could turn cancerous. This must be stopped. If doxxing ICE employees is necessary to stop Palantir then so be it.

Peter Thiel has gotten a citizenship in another country and he knows the monster he has created. He doesn't to his children or this family to be consumed by the monster he built.

@ Damien Matthews

"Anyone interested in seeing a practical example of the enormous volume of information readily accessible to law enforcement need only examine the many hundreds of pages of police records released by court order in the Jussie Smollett case. They were released as court records, not police records... otherwise you would never see them, and they contain *everything* about the guy and his friends. The volume of information is staggering...."

Correct, and probably worse than most people perceive. The machinery for another Hitler is in place just ready to be used. It is stinking badly.

@ VIC

"... FBI was warned about the Tsarnaev brothers by Russian authorities who knew exactly what how bad these guys had become. And the FBI did nothing because they could not find any evidence against the brothers. Except that the Russians had warned the FBI twice that their mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, was a radical extremist. "

Exactly, the Government Spy system doesn't work - or is there for a completely unrelated purpose [such a incremental control of people]. It is a huge waste of money and should be drastically reduced or eliminated. The same goes for the cattle lines at USA "Ben Gurion" military airports and long stupefying lines at the US border.

The US Police Spy System appears to be a third world corrupt shake-down scam where Police and others hiding behind badges are now looking like old corrupt Mexican police who line their pockets with bribes.

I'll stop now because it is depressing to think of how militarized the USA civilian environment has become from years past. It must be stopped and remedied.

GeorgeJuly 19, 2019 1:05 AM

@Clive Robinson wrote, "Which is why Peter Theil has read the some what lunatic book of Reese-Mogg senior[1] and obtained both significant land holdings in New Zeland as well as citizenship, and reputedly has private transportation on continuous standby."

Evidently, this won't work out quite as he planned, as demonstratd in Kim Dotcom case. The far south isn't quite out the reach of USA hands, nor is its quasi-legal framework to freedom. The "free world" just isn't quite as advertised, shall we say.

Clive RobinsonJuly 19, 2019 4:43 AM

@ George,

The far south isn't quite out the reach of USA hands, nor is its quasi-legal framework to freedom.

That implies a "functioning US Government within international norms".

The book and what SHTF-Prepers are plsning for is a Government that is not functioning within international or social norms.

What you might call the "Zombie Apocalypse Scenario" where some one has in effect given the old maritime cry of "Everyman for himself" where "the law of the sea" is assumed suspended, but to Society and Governance.

As any honest law enforcment officer will tell you they only have control by what is in effect a confidence trick. That is the notion of "endless pursuit" by fellow law enforcment officers. Where that is of no concern to an individual then the law officers "badge" becomes a convenient aim point.

The simple fact is there can never be sufficient law officers or soldiers or other types of Guard Labour to stop a civilian population that decides it's better off without them. It's something that very few want to have discussed let alone discuss it. Instead they talk of "Force Multipliers" and "Technology Solutions" that in reality are no more than a variation on the same confidence trick.

The reason authoritarian leaders like these force multiplying technology solutions is that they get the illusion of removing "unreliable humans" from their "ultimate control loop" thus having more direct control. Hence the idea of an uncontrolable "Madman with their finger on the button" of some kind of doomsday device. Which has been standard "movie plot" meme since the movies started.

However things tend not to work that way for various reasons, not least because human trust has limits... that is people maintain personal power not just against those below them in the hierarchy but also to protect them from those above. As noted threatening those below is only effective when they believe it can be enforced against them or they care. When using it for protection from those above, you make sure as best you can that those above can only make threats, and not enforce them, thus not only do you have protection you also enforce their reliance on you in your place of power.

The game Peter Theil and Co are playing with Palantir is to become what is in effect "the power behind the throne". If they take over the collection of data for the Government entities by under bidding the Governments own entities, then the Government by the usual political rules ends up going with the cheapest option, especially if it offers more than they can do themselves. In that way the Government becomes dependent on those that control Palantir, thus a reliance structure comes into place. As long as Peter Theil and Co can maintain control of the information flow then they are in effect safe.

If someone worked for Palantir they to if they had any sense would ensure that they had leverage on those above... Thus it becomes an interesting game of who can outsmart who and more importantly what they do with such power and when.

From a security and psyhchological aspects this all becomes rather interesting, if you can of course retain your freedom of identity from it.

65535July 19, 2019 9:39 AM

@ Clive Robinson

I cannot disagree with your overall theme in you last two posts. You make some good points.

If I grasp your core point [or point wrapped within a question]:

"...true the building future "abusive quasi-military" US Government will not "be stopped and remedied" within its self, "What will happen?"...only two possibilities exist in the short term, firstly the US Citizen's learn to live under the yoke of oppression of an "abusive quasi-military" Police state held in power by authoritarian following guard labour. Or secondly there is some form of internal insurrection, which with the current policy of the US Government to supply local Law Enforcment with battlefield weapons and vehicles is unlikely to be a peacefull occurrence... That is are they going to be the Patriots that remove the tyrants and in the process with theirs and others blood refresh the tree of liberty [Civil war]?"- Clive R

So your saying that the USA will go into some epoch marked by a Civil War? But, your best bet is USA citizen living under the yoke of economic slavery?

I am skeptical that Americans will watch their freedoms, livelihoods and ability to communicate freely slowly vaporized. There will be a backlash of some type but probably not a civil war.

Maybe, the backlash could be something entirely unexpected. A slow division of abusive corporations legally? A quick division of abusive corporations due to poor sales? Some unexpected dissolving of abusive corporations in a odd way?

The USA has had civil war which depending the particular historian telling it was caused by 1] the Northern states economically strangulating the Southern States leading a bloody port blockages and a horrible war 2] Some grand policy division on racial aspects of the freeing the slaves. Either way, economics was involved say - cheap slave labor helping one side or possibly the northern banks cutting off credit and eventually making Southern bank bills un-useable in trade => causing naval confrontation, naval blockages and a very bloody war.

I don't know if the USA was divided or not at certain times. Maybe. Those times would include the Revolutionary War and succession from the UK... cough.. I guess that is debatable - look at the UKs problem with IRA in Ireland. Division is a relative term depending on time and conditions.

[On to more current problems]

"The game Peter Theil and Co are playing with Palantir is to become what is in effect "the power behind the throne"... In that way the Government becomes dependent on those that control Palantir, thus a reliance structure comes into place. As long as Peter Theil and Co can maintain control of the information flow then they are in effect safe." - Clive R

Sure, it is beginng to look that way. Technology and clever theft of individuals data has caused huge gaps in wealth amoung those who have the data [information] and those who are being fleeced of it. The average Jane/Joe American could be in an oppressive economic yoke and remain there for a long time. That is a possiblity. But, I don't think American citizens will be sheep to be shorne. They can be very inventive when faced with the yoke of poverty. And, my stance is not to give up. I beleive it is best to always resist this economic yoke at every turn.

Now, being in an oppressive economic yoke is not new in history. The Romans did it for two hundred years to peasants before loosing complete control over their empire and crumbling into history - as other empire did.

Peter Theil has... obtained both significant land holdings in New Zeland as well as citizenship, and reputedly has private transportation on continuous standby... [a survivalist mentality or preparation Sheat Hitting the Fan] and who may take the last bus out of the USA or "cut-n-run" when the up-rising comes. It could happen. There are fairly large number of "Survivalist" with their guns and knives who have the same mentality.

That is not new. The USA can be a dangerous place if you live on the boarder or in any large urban slum city with a history of riots [Chicago, San Francisco, LA, parts of New York, Miam and so on]. It may be necessary to move.

Theil did NOT help the average Jane/Joe - he did the opposite! Theil probably suppects reporcussions aginst him - legal or physical. He move his citizenship.

Clive, your other logical obvervations are faily good:

"...any honest law enforcment officer will tell you they only have control by what is in effect a confidence trick. That is the notion of "endless pursuit" by fellow law enforcment officers. Where that is of no concern to an individual then the law officers "badge" becomes a convenient aim point." - Clive R

I cannot dissagree.

I do believe the Cops shooting citizen in an exectuion fashion in recent years is troubling. But, flip side of the coin is there are other citizens who think it is OK because the US Legal System has become soft, ineffective, and doesn't really deter crime - hence a few killing of trouble makers is fine. I dissagree with that stance - or summary police executions. This is a slippery slope.

Historically, US LEs were over zelous and quick using the trigger finger. During the alchohol prohibition in the 1930 to 1940 where Feds basically gunned down gansters when possible. But, that is history and I hope we don't see that abuse of Badges and weapons again.

This whole "National Security" meme [NSL gag order] is somewhat similar to that prior G-men v. alcholo gangs situation - Feds aginst civilians.

It is indeed very troubling. Further, I now see journalist removing their actual thumbnail photos from news articals - which is sign of the fearful power of Theil's Monster. That situation should not be ignored and should be resited at every juncture.

Peter Theil's Pal-Plow is crushing journalist and free speech. And, he is encouraging push button law enforcement - directly enabling ICE mass arrests of people. This is horrible.

The current situation is undesirable. Again, I say resist suffication of privacy and free speech at very opportunity. Clive's Robinsons posts are detailed and provocative but to continue to live under the data brokers' yoke is no answer. I doubt armed revolution is viable - but exposing and pushing back aginst Theil's Monster is a viable solution.

[Excuse the mistakes - this is a quick post]

vas pupJuly 19, 2019 12:07 PM

French sci-fi team called on to predict future threats:
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49044892

"The French army is to create a "red team" of sci-fi writers to imagine possible future threats.

A new report by the Defense Innovation Agency (DIA) said the visionaries will "propose scenarios of disruption" that military strategists may not think of.

The team's highly confidential work will be important in the fight against "malicious elements", the report states.

It comes amid efforts by the French to innovate its approaches to defense.

An inventor piloted his jet-powered fly board over crowds at Bastille Day military celebrations in Paris on Sunday."

"Comprised of just four or five sci-fi writers,
====>>>the group will be expected to think more creatively than more traditional elements of the army."

Yeah, sure. When you are within the environment where following order is the rule, you ability to think by your own head not flourished.

vas pupJuly 19, 2019 12:33 PM

Emotion-detection applications built on outdated science, report warns:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190718085318.htm

"Software that purportedly reads emotions in faces is being deployed or tested for a variety of purposes, including surveillance, hiring, clinical diagnosis, and market research. But a new scientific report finds that facial movements are an inexact gauge of a person's feelings, behaviors or intentions."

The authors note that the general public and some scientists believe that there are unique facial expressions that reliably indicate six emotion categories: anger, sadness, happiness, disgust, fear, and surprise. But in reviewing more than 1,000 published findings about facial movements and emotions, they found that typical study designs don't capture the real-life differences in the way people convey and interpret emotions on faces. A scowl or a smile can express more than one emotion depending on the situation, the individual or the culture, they say.

"People scowl when angry, on average, approximately 25 percent of the time, but they move their faces in other meaningful ways when angry," Barrett explains. "They might cry, or smile, or widen their eyes and gasp. And they also scowl when not angry, such as when they are concentrating or when they have a stomach ache. Similarly, most smiles don't imply that a person is happy, and most of the time people who are happy do something other than smile."

In a separate article in the journal, Alan Cowen and Dacher Keltner of the University of California, Berkeley; Disa Sauter, University of Amsterdam; and Jessica L. Tracy of the University of British Columbia note that most scientists agree that facial expressions are meaningful, even if they don't follow a one-to-one match with six basic emotion categories.
====>They propose a new model for studying emotion-related responses in all their complexity and variations. This approach would measure not only facial cues, but also body movements, voice fluctuations, head movements and other indicators to capture such nuanced responses as smiles of embarrassment or sympathetic vocalizations, they say.

The report's conclusions have broad implications, according to the authorship team. The FBI and the Transportation Security Administration have trained agents in the past to assess smiling, scowling and other facial movements to identify and stop potential terrorists. Law enforcement agencies in the United States and Europe are now experimenting with technologies designed to automate emotion detection through facial scans. Some companies are experimenting with software to track the facial movements of job applicants during interviews. Such technology might be able to detect facial movements, but they do not detect the psychological meaning of those facial movements, Barrett and co-authors say.

"We thought this was an especially important issue to address because of the way so-called 'facial expressions' are being used in industry, educational and medical settings, and in national security," say Barrett and her co-authors.""

TRXJuly 19, 2019 12:50 PM

Various Federal and "law enforcement" agencies set up "fusion centers" years ago. They operate pretty much under the radar. They're ostensibly private firms that do consulting for police work; in practice, they have no other customers, which makes them de facto police intelligence agencies.

Since they're technically private, the rules for police and court information collection don't apply.

Palantir is operating as a "fusion center", except it's using a vendor/customer relationship instead of pretending to be a consultancy.

gordoJuly 20, 2019 6:42 AM

How Peter Thiel's Secretive Data Company Pushed Into Policing
By Mark Harris, Backchannel, 08.09.17

This is the story of how Palantir, despite the issues unearthed by Backchannel’s investigation, came to quietly dominate the domestic law enforcement intelligence infrastructure of the US’s most populous state—and how it could replicate that across the nation and around the world.

https://www.wired.com/story/how-peter-thiels-secretive-data-company-pushed-into-policing/

Clive RobinsonJuly 20, 2019 10:29 AM

@ gordo,

How Peter Thiel's Secretive Data Company...

The article confirms what I had heard from other sources, hence the concerns I have expressed.

The big things it does confirm is,

1, GIGO applies big time as does the automation of discrimination.

2, Nobody gets to see the raw data or processing algorithms just results. So nobody gets legall standing to gain remidies.

3, The "Nothing succeds like failure" original Microsoft business model is still alive and well.

4, Big Tech are still the biggest "Welfare Momers" on the planet to fat and lazy to do anything except connive to hang off the tax dollar teat, sucking society dry.

But it's not all Palantir's fault, those with the money failed to fix sensible terms of service. Whilst I know this can be difficult, simple things like "data ownership" and "how" and in what format it is to be maintained such that the rights pertaining to ownership can be maintained across service provider transition are considered "primary requirments" these days, as is tracability of usage such that fees for use by third parties can be levied etc. Also the basic rules about how to not get "locked-in" in the way IBM pionered in the 1960's and 70's which so many suppliers followed which is one of the prime risks of "X As A Service" of cloud style operations.

Sadly the whole thing reads like a story of some rube getting gulled and stripped by artfull shyster con artists (just as PayPal does).

But if you read the article carefully there is also that old Microsoft "Throw in new bells and whistles, but fix only the minimum of problems, to keep the upgrade cash flowing in" model at work.

There is also the bit in there about "users having to be programmers to get Palantir systems to be of use..." This begs a question as to "Appart from fancy graphics displays is Palantir offering anything that could not be done by an object oriented database and a good set of query writers?"

All in all Palantir sounds like an overly hyped system upgraded by marketing "bells and whistles" supported by a rapacious drain on public resources.

Oh and that "Drug Dealer build dependency" trick. Federal Grants only for "high tec" etc, getting exploited untill dependancy holds the public service organisation veins wide open. You would think that Federal Grant funders would have woken up to this by now... Which begs the question of if they are getting paid in some way not to notice...

GeorgeJuly 20, 2019 10:21 PM

@Clive Robinson wrote, "The game Peter Theil and Co are playing with Palantir is to become what is in effect "the power behind the throne"."

Collection of data does not remotely imply achieving the power to effectively apply it. The power of enforcement still rests within the government, which is why it is trivial to see that "poewr behind the throne" are simply those who exempted themselves from the government thru some form of "self-regulation" such as in the case of finance.

If we look at the MVC paradigm, the collection of data represents the viewport, while the control rests else where (within the government and other "self-regulating" bodies).

Thus, what Thiel and Co. are doing is no different than what Brin and others have already done at Google (which rightfully earned them a seat to the party).

Clive RobinsonJuly 21, 2019 7:57 AM

@ George,

Collection of data does not remotely imply achieving the power to effectively apply it.

But the control of information does, which is what Peter Theil and Plantir are working towards.

For many millennia the accepted wisdom has been "He who controls the high ground..." which is why we have so many "hill forts" and "cliff and mountain top castles" in places with multi-millennia civilisations and histories.

However by the time of the Tudors half a millennium ago it was realised that "controling trade routes" was actually as important. Hence Henry VIII built what some historians considered "The First Modern Navy" where the notion of "floating castles" or "Battle ships" that could "project power" by cannon came to be.

A little over a century ago what some historians consider the prototype-scientific or technical war the use of force multiplers (engines) and range multipliers (communications) evolved into effective battle field devices. Thus a little less than a century ago, those Generals that had been defeated, put their minds towards how to win the next war, whilst the victorious generals as usual did not think of new methods to wage war or how to defend against them. What those defeated generals realised was that strong points such as castles or embedded fortifications were effectively weak points in battle planning. That is highly mobile forces that fortifications were not designed to deal with were key, with that mobility the issue of command and control rested on effective communications. Not just between brigade commanders and troops as it had been by phone line in WWI, but troops to troops and especially aircraft and infantry.

Thus the notion of blitzkrieg, that was used to destroy fixed points in roads, railways and telephone communications and broadcasting stations. Denying not just mobility and communications to the targeted forces but also the civilian population, whilst also sowing as much fear or in more modern parlance "Shock and awe" into both thus effectively creating paralysis in the targeted forces and population.

By the end of WWII it was clear to all that the "new high ground" was information or the effective usage of it. That is still very much true today, especially when trying to fight in an asymetric warfare environment. A small attacking force survives by denying information to the larger force. The appear then disappear with as little trace as possible and effectively hide in plain sight in the general populous. The only way a larger force can engage with the small force and neutralize them is by the gathering of any and all information, processing it and extracting actionable intelligence from it, which is an involved and resources intensive process, often needing specialised personnel often called analysts.

So it's not the person who collects data that is critical to this function it's the people that control the flow of information and process it. Thus "Information control and processing is the new high ground" and not just in warfare.

Law enforcment and civil control are all about "asymetric warfare" activities. Whilst LEO numbers are very large when compared to criminal or other groups they are very small thus dispersed when compared to the general population in which the criminal and other groups hide in plain sight. Thus their success is critically dependent on "Information control and processing". Which in this current political climate decides the future not just of organisations but people as well.

The likes of CCTV and the information it provides has enabled "directed policing" that for petty and street crime helps reduce the numbers of crimes, or alows the politicians dream of reduced numbers of police officers, whilst also appearing "tough on crime". Importantly though it is only the "bottom feeder" type criminals and their crimes that have been effected. Other crime figures due to reductions in policing numbers and experience are getting worse.

As has been known for years most criminals who get caught, get caught due to "information received" or in their vernacular "somebody grassed them up" quite often it's because they are stupid and "big it up" in some way. As war time posters used to say "loose lips cost ships", thus whilst these criminals are not quite the dregs of the criminal classes they are mainly being caught through their own stupidity. Which means that the slightly smarter criminals are not being caught.

Whilst there is evidence that LEO's will "frame" or "fit up" individuals usually it is because whilst they have sufficient "information received" to know who repeate offenders are, those who are slightly smarter and don't "big it up" and have better planing for their activities don't produce the evidence the police reduced resources can find. Thus acceptable by court evidence is unavailable to convict such criminals, so it is made up in some way, which is why plea bargaining is such a strong part of some judicial systems as is false "taking into account".

As "fitting up" does not work as well as it used to, especially with the more intelligent criminals who take security seriously, other more modern but equally as questionable methods are being developed and used. One such method has been called "parallel construction", it's used where the "information received" has been obtained by methods that are not legal or highly questionable. Thus the information has to be "processed" in some way to make it legaly acceptable to a court as evidence[1].

Whilst there are not laws as such about the use of "traffic analysis" of communications meta data, meta data of all forms when processed correctly can produce actionable intelligence, that can for other reasons not be used in court as it's not generally explainable to a jury or judge. For instance geographical information of mobile phone use reveals all sorts of information not just about who has it in their possession but the usage patterns reveal if it is being used as a "borrower"[2] or "burner" phone, which are indicators of "activities of interest" but are not direct evidence of criminal behaviour thus at best only circumstantial evidence, even though highly indicative to a specialist analyst.

Thus how to get from "indicative intelligence" to court admisable evidence that is more than circumstantial.

This can be done in a number of ways however the way that is easiest is also questionable if not illegal. The "indicative" or "actionable" evidence is then used to asign limited resources such as questionable / illegal wire taps or questionable / illegal surveilence to gather further intelligence. This might involve going from "technical" to "human" surveillance, the latter being significantly more resource intensive. Or it might lead to the ability to get evidence by searching "Third Party Records" that do not require warrants or other court controled evidence gathering techniques. However a more modern method is to take questionable / illegal inteligence and feed into a parallel construction process, that hides the questionable / illegal inteligence gathering from not just the court but the defence as well.

What Palantir is designed to do is not "collect data" but "process data" into "actionable intelligence" what they are doing is getting those who buy there services to enter data into Palantir's systems, record the types of searches those purchasors make and turn both the data and search methods into their "intellectual property" that they then sell to others to "wash, rinse, spin and repeate". As part of that they take the knowledge of specialists and devolve it down to less and less specialised users at each stage. But as part of this just like drug dealers they give discounts and other incentives ti get their buyers not just hooked but addicted to the point of near total dependency on their services at which point that opaque pricing structure becomes a blood letting process where by they bleed their customers almost to the point of being dry. Certainly to the point where the customer can not get their own data and take it somewhere else, or build up an inhouse specialist group or other expertise.

But there is also the "Mystique of AI" that makes the likes of "Parallel Construction" not just way way easier to do it also makes it almost entirely opaque if not invisable to oversite. It also enables Palantir to steal both customer data and methods and by a proces of highly questionable "conversion" turn it into their own "Intellectual Property" which they can privately benifit from without as would be usually required paying royalties to the originators who at the end of the day are payed for by the tax payer. So Palantir are defrauding the public.

Why you have not seen this I don't know but it's what Palantir are clearly doing.

Worse we actually know they are not doing it in either a secure or workman like manner. People who should not get access to highly confidential data are, there are significant uncorrected errors in the data and the methods are in effect stolen and reused without consideration for the level of reliability or bias involved.

All of which is being used on the civilian population who have no recourse civil or criminal if they are harresed, incorrectly treated or falsely criminalised...

[1] The idea of the procesing of not legaly usable intel via "Parallel Construction" can be easily seen with the following overview of an event known to have happened. A vehical gets pulled over by a police vehical for a minor and unquantifiable reason such as "driving without due care and attention". The police vehicle just happens to be "the dog patrol" and the dog gives signs of drugs etc. A search is carried out and significant quantities of illegal drugs get found hidden in the pulled over vehicle. An acceptable series of events to a court, but what was the reality... It started with what would be an illegal wiretap or surveillance operation that got information about a drugs run timing etc. Thus the dog patrol vehicle was deployed at the right time and place with knowledge of exactly which vehical to pull over and search. Other units were also deployed incase the suspect vehical tried to make a getaway etc. We know this goes on because of a loop hole that UK law enforcment exploited but tried to keep quiet. The laws on surveillance in some EU countries are very different than the UK so smuggling operations could be legaly put under surveillance etc, but if the evidence was used in a UK court, not only would it get challenged it would alert other criminal gangs to what had happened and they could learn from it. Thus "subterfuge" was used to protect the real information abd questionable Dutch source. Further we know from a case where a police survailance operative who had tresspassed on private property and been stabbed by the property owner that illegal surveillance techniques are emoloyed. We also know from a paternity / child support case that the UK Met Police used "deep undercover officers" who routienly carried out immoral and illegal activities whilst trying to get into and stir up otherwise peacefull protest groups that were although behaving quite legaly were politically inconvenient, thus had to be dealt with... This also led to revelations that the Met Police were gathering intel on the protesters and handing it over to private organisations with the purpose of them provoking activities that would give rise to civil or criminal court action.

[2] Whilst most are aware that "burner phones" are those purchased anonymously used for only extreamly limited use then disposed of, not as many are aware of the idea of "tweener" and "borrower" phones. To deal with burner phones some authorities have regulated the market such that no phones can be purchased or connected anonymously to a network. Which makes burner phones problematical unless you have certain technical expertise. Thus the "smart minds" on the other side have realised that you can use non anonymous phones anonymously if you "borrow" them in some way. This idea goes back long before mobile phones to cars and other licensed road vehicles such as commercial haulage. When a car was sold to a dealer, the dealer did not "re-register" the car so the old "one carefull owner" statment could be used. Thus for a period of time a dealer had possession of a vehicle that was to "official records" not theirs. They had in effect got it "borrowed" from the actuall registered keeper, and got the use of it "between" registered keepers. Back when it was easy to "wind the clock back", "hot wire" or "dip the door lock" on vehicles this proved an attractive option to certain types of criminals for moving around stolen goods or going to covert meeting etc. Provided they were carefull nobody other than themselves would ever know. Well the second hand phone market provides the same opportunity to "borrow" in "between" phone owners such that carefull use does not show up as anomolous, thus you get the anonymity of a "burner" without having to burn it[3].

[3] We also know that alledged terrorists used a similar technique to "tweener" phones to avoid drone strikes. They would obtain a phone and service use it once or at most twice then give it away or sell it on the cheap. If a drone strike happened then it also gave free propaganda about the US targeting and murdering innocent civilians.

gordoJuly 21, 2019 2:30 PM

@ George,

Thus, what Thiel and Co. are doing is no different than what Brin and others have already done at Google (which rightfully earned them a seat to the party).

To wit . . .

Google’s true origin partly lies in CIA and NSA research grants for mass surveillance
By Jeff Nesbit, December 8, 2017
Former director of legislative and public affairs, National Science Foundation

The story of the deliberate creation of the modern mass-surveillance state includes elements of Google’s surprising, and largely unknown, origin. It is a somewhat different creation story than the one the public has heard, and explains what Google cofounders Sergey Brin and Larry Page set out to build, and why.

https://qz.com/1145669/googles-true-origin-partly-lies-in-cia-and-nsa-research-grants-for-mass-surveillance/

See also (as referenced in the above article, the " 'birds of a feather' briefing"):

mail.cypherpunks ›
Intelligence Community Massive Digital Data Systems Initiative [MDDS]
11/23/1995

[. . .]


This paper has identified a set of issues for managing the data in massive
digital data systems with a focus on intelligence applications. First, an
overview of the current approaches to data management and the scalability of the
current approaches were discussed Then some architectural and data modeling
issues were given. Finally, a discussion of the issues for the various functions
of MDDS were given. The set of issues identified is by no means considered a
complete list. As the progression of research, prototyping, and deployments
continue, new or hidden challenges will arise.

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/mail.cypherpunks/4CDiW59hS88

Thus, the likes of Palantir, etc., e.g., data integration, visualization and analysis. As our host has put it: "Surveillance is the business model of the Internet":

By handing the data over, users have an expectation of trust that Google, Facebook, and other data brokers will do the right thing with the personal data. However, this becomes a power play when governments get involved. Governments don't need to collect the data themselves when corporations are already doing it.

https://www.schneier.com/news/archives/2014/04/surveillance_is_the.html

---

@ Clive Robinson,

The article confirms what I had heard from other sources, . . . . The big things it does confirm . . .

Thanks for culling out Palantir's questionable if not predatory business business practices from the Wired article.

For another view of what's happening, this, from "the frontlines":

The Disastrous 'War on Terror' Has Come Home
Oct 19, 2018 Opinion

For Jamie Garcia of the Stop LAPD Spying Coalition, the possibilities are terrifying and limitless. In the latest installment of “Scheer Intelligence,” she and host Robert Scheer discuss how local police forces are working hand in hand with Palantir, an organization funded by the CIA. Specifically, they explore how data mining and “predictive policing” pose an existential threat to people of color. Observes Garcia: “It takes us back to post-9/11 in which Congress wanted to set up a way to make domestic law enforcement the eyes and ears of the federal government.”


[. . .]

That’s the reason why when we think about these kind of policies and ordinances that are starting to be pushed nationwide, saying if there’s only community control of surveillance then we’d be more protected, we would know what’s going on. But when you have your own city council not listening to the wishes of the community, you have your own police commission who’s supposed to be overseeing and in charge of the police not listening and completely going against the will of the community. You realize that there is no community control of these things. The Los Angeles Police Department will do what it wants. So I think that’s really important when we think about how we’re organizing against surveillance, and how we’re organizing against these policies and practices because I don’t think it’s something that our own city government wants to protect us from. And in fact the police commission was not even aware of the terminology of data driven evidence based policing and how it’s taken off. How the DOJ is providing grants through the Bureau of Justice Assistance to police departments like LAPD to create programs like LASER. Palantir is facilitating this process. And in fact we have spoken to other media outlets that have interviewed Palantir and they themselves say, “Well, it’s not us that’s doing this. We are just a provider of a service. It’s LAPD that’s doing this.”

[. . .]

I think that’s some of the bigger questions we have to ask ourselves as well, because so much technology and so much is moving with algorithms that we think it can solve every problem, but when we think about the problem of community safety, instead of the conditions that people are living under as being the problem, it’s the person and it’s the place that becomes the risk. It’s the person and the place that becomes the target. It’s the person and the place that gets extracted. Not poverty, not racism, not lack of schools, not lack of green spaces, not lack of grocery stores, none of those things become identified as the problem according to LAPD. I think those things are really important because again, it’s driving while black was predictive policing. We look at predictive policing now, and data is a proxy for race.

https://www.truthdig.com/articles/the-disastrous-war-on-terror-has-come-home/

---

Next, from the conclusion of an article at a popular law enforcement blog:

How police agencies can share criminal intelligence data
A recent DOJ-commissioned report provides guidance for police investigators and crime analysts
By Dale Stockton, PoliceOne, Feb 15, 2019

There is great potential for data integration having a positive impact on public safety given the ongoing development of technological tools and the increasing willingness to embed data more thoroughly in the daily work of public agencies. However, concerns over privacy and the protection of civil rights will be a significant issue and there are justified concerns about data security. Agencies entering into data-sharing partnerships must establish sufficient safeguards and protocols to protect against data breaches.


The future of integrated data will involve partnerships between practitioners, academics and researche[r]s wherein each stakeholder communicates needs and developments with stakeholders from other fields. The result of this type of strategic partnership approach will enable jurisdictions to effectively examine the relationships of neighborhood dynamics and crime, allowing police to respond more holistically to incidents by drawing on information beyond traditional criminal justice sources.

https://www.policeone.com/police-products/police-technology/police-software/articles/482778006-How-police-agencies-can-share-criminal-intelligence-data/

Here, I'll simply note that, whether it's an oversight by the author or an indication of law enforcement culture, in addition to glossing over numerous other issues by invoking concern over "data breaches", the communities being policed are not identified as "stakeholder[s]" in the "partnerships".

Lastly, this state of affairs seems to show how public interest law and public interest technology overlap.

20 July 2019 00:00:00July 21, 2019 7:49 PM

It appears that the Palantir connection to Cambridge Analytica, from around 2013 to 2014, may not have been discussed above:

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/mar/28/palantir-employee-cambridge-analytica

"US data firm admits employee approached Cambridge Analytica

Palantir confirm employee ‘engaged in a personal capacity’ with the company

Palantir, the US data analytics firm, has admitted that one of its employees “engaged in a personal capacity” with Cambridge Analytica, the company that obtained the Facebook data of 50 million US voters, in an apparent departure from previous denials of any relationship.

Christopher Wylie, the former research director of Cambridge Analytica, told a parliamentary inquiry into online disinformation that “senior Palantir employees” had obtained the data at the heart of the privacy scandal that has engulfed the social media company.

A Palantir spokesperson initially denied Wylie’s allegations in their entirety. “Palantir has never had a relationship with Cambridge Analytica nor have we ever worked on any Cambridge Analytica data,” she said.

But just hours later the firm conceded it had learned that one of its employees had in fact approached the company, following questions from the Guardian and the New York Times.

In a second statement, Palantir reiterated that had never had a formal relationship with Cambridge Analytica. It said: “We were approached by individuals from Cambridge Analytica on multiple occasions, but we declined to move forward.

“As a matter of company policy, we do not and have never worked on or been involved with elections or political campaigns anywhere in the world.

“We learned today that an employee, in 2013-2014, engaged in an entirely personal capacity with people associated with Cambridge Analytica. We are looking into this and will take the appropriate action.”

The admission is an embarrassing volte-face for the secretive firm, which had denied any relationship whatsoever with Cambridge Analytica in a statement to the Observer last year.

The Facebook data at the heart of the scandal was originally obtained by an academic named Aleksandr Kogan, who built a survey app called “thisismydigitallife”. In addition to collecting information from survey respondents, the app obtained data from friends of respondents.

Kogan, who was believed to have obtained data on around 50m Facebook profiles through the app, subsequently set up a company called Global Science Research, which shared the data with Cambridge Analytica.

The Guardian has seen emails that appear to show a developer discussing the possibility of replicating the work of a University of Cambridge professor and encouraging people to take a personality survey.

The emails appear to show the developer, who has previously described himself as working with Palantir, discussing the subject with Wylie.

“I had [a] left field idea,” the developer wrote in a May 2014 email. “What about replicating the work of the Cambridge prof as a mobile app that connects to Facebook? For example compare your personality to your friends app or some other spin to entice people to take a test.”

A second email dated July 2014 appears to show the same developer asking another academic if he could “share some Facebook credentials with me (user/pass) – I need to test our version of the app?”

The academic replied with a URL referencing Kogan’s personality survey and a phrase that included his initials.

In his testimony before the digital, culture, media and sport select committee, Wylie had claimed that they had several meetings with Palantir and that the firm had informal access to the Kogan data.

“There were senior Palantir employees that were also working on the Facebook data,” he said. “That was not an official contract between Palantir and CA, but there were Palantir staff who would come into the office and work on the data. And we would go and meet with Palantir staff at Palantir.”"...


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/27/us/cambridge-analytica-palantir.html

"As a start-up called Cambridge Analytica sought to harvest the Facebook data of tens of millions of Americans in summer 2014, the company received help from at least one employee at Palantir Technologies, a top Silicon Valley contractor to American spy agencies and the Pentagon.

It was a Palantir employee in London, working closely with the data scientists building Cambridge’s psychological profiling technology, who suggested the scientists create their own app — a mobile-phone-based personality quiz — to gain access to Facebook users’ friend networks, according to documents obtained by The New York Times.

Cambridge ultimately took a similar approach. By early summer, the company found a university researcher to harvest data using a personality questionnaire and Facebook app. The researcher scraped private data from over 50 million Facebook users — and Cambridge Analytica went into business selling so-called psychometric profiles of American voters, setting itself on a collision course with regulators and lawmakers in the United States and Britain.

Image
Mr. Thiel at Trump Tower in Manhattan. He serves on the board at Facebook."...

20 July 2019 00:00:00July 22, 2019 6:59 AM

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/12/business/media/thiel-gawker-bid.html

"Thiel Makes a Bid for Gawker.com, a Site He Helped Bankrupt...
It also emerged that Mr. Thiel had spent about $10 million in secretly backing the lawsuit [see below], a move that many Gawker employees interpreted as an attempt at revenge."

From 2016, https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/aug/15/peter-thiel-gawker-bankruptcy-lawsuit-hulk-hogan-sextape

"Thiel funded a lawsuit by retired wrestler Terry Bollea, better known as Hulk Hogan, that ended in March with a jury’s order that Gawker pay $140m in damages. In June, the media organization filed for bankruptcy and put itself up for auction; the announcement of a new owner is expected Tuesday.
Billionaire's revenge: Facebook investor Peter Thiel’s nine-year Gawker grudge

In an op-ed published by the New York Times on Monday, Thiel justified...

Gawker has defended itself in court by arguing that Bollea’s personal life was of public interest because of his celebrity, but a jury unanimously rejected this and found that the site had violated his privacy."

gordoJuly 26, 2019 6:00 AM

There's an app for that . . .

Records Show Palantir Made $60 Million Contracting with ICE for Mobile App
by Eric Draitser, Counterpunch,
July 26, 2019

A critical July 2019 exposé from WNYC based on documents obtained via FOIA request shows how Palantir’s proprietary software, in this case the FALCON mobile app, is essential to the removal operations of ICE and related agencies. As WNYC explained, “FALCON mobile allows agents in the field to search through a fusion of law enforcement databases that include information on people’s immigration histories, family relationships, and past border crossings.”

https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/07/26/records-show-palantir-made-60-million-contracting-with-ice-for-mobile-app/

gordoJuly 26, 2019 5:00 PM

Excellent article:

Big Data Surveillance: The Case of Policing
Sarah Brayne
First Published August 29, 2017 | Research Article
https://doi.org/10.1177/0003122417725865
Article Information Open epub

Abstract
This article examines the intersection of two structural developments: the growth of surveillance and the rise of “big data.” Drawing on observations and interviews conducted within the Los Angeles Police Department, I offer an empirical account of how the adoption of big data analytics does—and does not—transform police surveillance practices. I argue that the adoption of big data analytics facilitates amplifications of prior surveillance practices and fundamental transformations in surveillance activities. First, discretionary assessments of risk are supplemented and quantified using risk scores. Second, data are used for predictive, rather than reactive or explanatory, purposes. Third, the proliferation of automatic alert systems makes it possible to systematically surveil an unprecedentedly large number of people. Fourth, the threshold for inclusion in law enforcement databases is lower, now including individuals who have not had direct police contact. Fifth, previously separate data systems are merged, facilitating the spread of surveillance into a wide range of institutions. Based on these findings, I develop a theoretical model of big data surveillance that can be applied to institutional domains beyond the criminal justice system. Finally, I highlight the social consequences of big data surveillance for law and social inequality.

Clive RobinsonJuly 26, 2019 7:42 PM

@ gordo,

Suprise surprise, the research shows that Palantir systems for the LAPD are not good news. Thus it's likely they are not worth the money etc...

I'm not surprised Palantir are so secretive, the more we learn about them, the mote obvious it is we would be better off without their activities.

A thought still occurs to me as to who the real customers of all this data realy are. The LAPD are putting in their data and we know it's being used by others.

The question is as LAPD are at the bottom of the Palantir food chain, who is at the top. Knowing where their original seed money came from, it leaves me with the worrying feeling that contrary to what they are supposed to be about, the CIA is now bigtime into domestic surveillance through the likes of Palantir and others...

name.withheld.for.obvious.reasonsJuly 27, 2019 9:09 AM

@ Ridiculous

I don't think the general public understands what "persistent keyword monitoring" really means.

Do not forget to wed this operational characteristic with the behavioral CE (Continuous Evaluation)

Sheldon Cooper taught me this one...
\
By the way, your on unpaid suspension starting now--JOKING--it started yesterday.
\

name.withheld.for.obvious.reasonsJuly 27, 2019 9:12 AM

Previous Post: Correction

Unguarded SGML, regular expressions unescaped.

@ Ridiculous

I don't think the general public understands what "persistent keyword monitoring" really means.

Do not forget to wed this operational characteristic with the behavioral CE (Continuous Evaluation)

Sheldon Cooper taught me this one...


\
By the way, your on unpaid suspension starting now--JOKING--it started yesterday.
\

gordoJuly 27, 2019 10:33 AM

@ Clive Robinson,

The question is as LAPD are at the bottom of the Palantir food chain, who is at the top.

I see DHS as the domestic version of the CIA. Also, as executive branch exercises of its authority have shown, of the 17 members of the US intelligence community, DHS seems to be the most subject to politicization.

---

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Department_of_Homeland_Security#Function

https://www.intelligence.gov/index.php/how-the-ic-works/our-organizations/420-dhs-office-of-intelligence-and-analysis

https://www.dhs.gov/office-intelligence-and-analysis

https://www.dni.gov

Leave a comment

Allowed HTML: <a href="URL"> • <em> <cite> <i> • <strong> <b> • <sub> <sup> • <ul> <ol> <li> • <blockquote> <pre>

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.