Essays in the Category “Internet and Society”

2015: The Year "Doxing" Will Hit Home

  • Bruce Schneier
  • BetaBoston
  • December 31, 2014

Those of you unfamiliar with hacker culture might need an explanation of “doxing.”

The word refers to the practice of publishing personal information about people without their consent. Usually it’s things like an address and phone number, but it can also be credit card details, medical information, private e-mails—pretty much anything an assailant can get his hands on.

Doxing is not new; the term dates back to 2001 and the hacker group Anonymous. But it can be incredibly offensive. In 2014, several women were doxed by male gamers trying to intimidate them into keeping silent about sexism in computer games.

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Over 700 Million People Taking Steps to Avoid NSA Surveillance

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Lawfare
  • December 15, 2014

German translation by Yuri Samoilov

There's a new international survey on Internet security and trust, of '23,376 Internet users in 24 countries,' including 'Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Poland, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, Tunisia, Turkey and the United States.' Amongst the findings, 60% of Internet users have heard of Edward Snowden, and 39% of those 'have taken steps to protect their online privacy and security as a result of his revelations.'

The press is mostly spinning this as evidence that Snowden has not had an effect: 'merely 39%,' 'only 39%,' and so on. (Note that these articles are completely misunderstanding the data. It's not 39% of people who are taking steps to protect their privacy post-Snowden, it's 39% of the 60% of Internet users—which is not everybody—who have heard of him. So it's much less than 39%.)

Even so, I disagree with the 'Edward Snowden Revelations Not Having Much Impact on Internet Users' headline.

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The Battle for Power on the Internet

Distributed citizen groups and nimble hackers once had the edge. Now governments and corporations are catching up. Who will dominate in the decades ahead?

  • Bruce Schneier
  • The Atlantic
  • October 24, 2013

Danish translation

We're in the middle of an epic battle for power in cyberspace. On one side are the traditional, organized, institutional powers such as governments and large multinational corporations.

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The Court of Public Opinion Is About Mob Justice and Reputation as Revenge

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Wired
  • February 26, 2013

Recently, Elon Musk and The New York Times took to Twitter and the internet to argue the data  -- and their grievances -- over a failed road test and car review. Meanwhile, an Applebee's server is part of a Change.org petition to get her job back after posting a pastor's no-tip receipt comment online. And when he wasn't paid quickly enough, a local Fitness SF web developer rewrote the company's webpage to air his complaint.

All of these 'cases' are seeking their judgments in the court of public opinion.

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Power And The Internet

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Edge
  • January 23, 2013

This essay appeared as a response to Edge's annual question, "What *Should* We Be Worried About?"

All disruptive technologies upset traditional power balances, and the Internet is no exception. The standard story is that it empowers the powerless, but that's only half the story. The Internet empowers everyone. Powerful institutions might be slow to make use of that new power, but since they are powerful, they can use it more effectively.

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Our New Regimes of Trust

  • Bruce Schneier
  • The SciTech Lawyer
  • Winter/Spring 2013

Society runs on trust. Over the millennia, we've developed a variety of mechanisms to induce trustworthy behavior in society. These range from a sense of guilt when we cheat, to societal disapproval when we lie, to laws that arrest fraudsters, to door locks and burglar alarms that keep thieves out of our homes. They're complicated and interrelated, but they tend to keep society humming along.

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When It Comes to Security, We're Back to Feudalism

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Wired
  • November 26, 2012

Some of us have pledged our allegiance to Google: We have Gmail accounts, we use Google Calendar and Google Docs, and we have Android phones. Others have pledged allegiance to Apple: We have Macintosh laptops, iPhones, and iPads; and we let iCloud automatically synchronize and back up everything. Still others of us let Microsoft do it all. Or we buy our music and e-books from Amazon, which keeps records of what we own and allows downloading to a Kindle, computer, or phone.

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News Media Strategies for Survival for Journalists

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Twin Cities Daily Planet
  • November 14, 2009

Those of us living through the Internet-caused revolution in journalism can't see what's going to come out the other side: how readers will interact with journalism, what the sources of journalism will be, how journalists will make money.  All we do know is that mass-market journalism is hurting, badly, and may not survive.  And that we have no idea how to thrive in this new world of digital media.

I have five pieces of advice to those trying to survive and wanting to thrive: based both on experiences as a successful Internet pundit and blogger, and my observations of others, successful and unsuccessful. 

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Social Networking Risks

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Information Security
  • February 2009

This essay appeared as the first half of a point-counterpoint with Marcus Ranum.

Are employees blogging corporate secrets? It's not an unreasonable fear, actually. People have always talked about work to their friends. It's human nature for people to talk about what's going on in their lives, and work is a lot of most people's lives.

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Here Comes Here Comes Everybody

Book Review of Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations
By Clay Shirky
Penguin Press: 2008. 336 pp. $25.95, ISBN: 978-159420153-0

  • Bruce Schneier
  • IEEE Spectrum
  • September 2008

In 1937, Ronald Coase answered one of the most perplexing questions in economics: if markets are so great, why do organizations exist? Why don't people just buy and sell their own services in a market instead?

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When the Internet Is My Hard Drive, Should I Trust Third Parties?

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Wired
  • February 21, 2008

Wine Therapy is a web bulletin board for serious wine geeks. It's been active since 2000, and its database of back posts and comments is a wealth of information: tasting notes, restaurant recommendations, stories and so on. Late last year someone hacked the board software, got administrative privileges and deleted the database. There was no backup.

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Photo of Bruce Schneier by Per Ervland.

Schneier on Security is a personal website. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of Resilient Systems, Inc.