Essays Tagged "Age"

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How to Keep Your Private Conversations Private for Real

Don't get doxed.

  • Bruce Schneier
  • The Washington Post
  • March 8, 2017

This essay also appeared in The Age.

A decade ago, I wrote about the death of ephemeral conversation. As computers were becoming ubiquitous, some unintended changes happened, too: Before computers, what we said disappeared once we’d said it. Neither face-to-face conversations nor telephone conversations were routinely recorded. A permanent communication was something different and special; we called it correspondence.

The Internet changed this. We now chat by text message and email, on Facebook and on Instagram. These conversations — with friends, lovers, colleagues, fellow employees — all leave electronic trails. And while we know this intellectually, we haven’t truly internalized it. We still think of conversation as ephemeral, forgetting that we’re being recorded and what we say has the permanence of correspondence…

People Understand Risks — But Do Security Staff Understand People?

Natural human risk intuition deserves respect -- even when it doesn't help the security team

  • Bruce Schneier
  • The Guardian
  • August 5, 2009

This essay also appeared in The Sydney Morning Herald, and The Age.

People have a natural intuition about risk, and in many ways it’s very good. It fails at times due to a variety of cognitive biases, but for normal risks that people regularly encounter, it works surprisingly well: often better than we give it credit for.

This struck me as I listened to yet another conference presenter complaining about security awareness training. He was talking about the difficulty of getting employees at his company to actually follow his security policies: encrypting data on memory sticks, not sharing passwords, not logging in from untrusted wireless networks. “We have to make people understand the risks,” he said…

Airplane Security and Metal Knives

  • Bruce Schneier
  • The Sydney Morning Herald
  • November 30, 2005

This essay also appeared in The Age.

Two weeks ago, Immigration Minister Amanda Vanstone caused a stir by ridiculing airplane security in a public speech. She derided much of post-9/11 airline security, especially the use of plastic knives instead of metal ones, and said “a lot of what we do is to make people feel better as opposed to actually achieve an outcome.”

As a foreigner, I know very little about Australian politics. I don’t know anything about Senator Vanstone, her politics, her policies, or her party. I have no idea what she stands for. But as a security technologist, I agree 100% with her comments. Most airplane security is what I call “security theater”: ineffective measures designed to make people feel better about flying…

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.