Cybersecurity During COVID-19

Three weeks ago (could it possibly be that long already?), I wrote about the increased risks of working remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic.

One, employees are working from their home networks and sometimes from their home computers. These systems are more likely to be out of date, unpatched, and unprotected. They are more vulnerable to attack simply because they are less secure.

Two, sensitive organizational data will likely migrate outside of the network. Employees working from home are going to save data on their own computers, where they aren't protected by the organization's security systems. This makes the data more likely to be hacked and stolen.

Three, employees are more likely to access their organizational networks insecurely. If the organization is lucky, they will have already set up a VPN for remote access. If not, they're either trying to get one quickly or not bothering at all. Handing people VPN software to install and use with zero training is a recipe for security mistakes, but not using a VPN is even worse.

Four, employees are being asked to use new and unfamiliar tools like Zoom to replace face-to-face meetings. Again, these hastily set-up systems are likely to be insecure.

Five, the general chaos of "doing things differently" is an opening for attack. Tricks like business email compromise, where an employee gets a fake email from a senior executive asking him to transfer money to some account, will be more successful when the employee can't walk down the hall to confirm the email's validity -- and when everyone is distracted and so many other things are being done differently.

NASA is reporting an increase in cyberattacks. From an agency memo:

A new wave of cyber-attacks is targeting Federal Agency Personnel, required to telework from home, during the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. During the past few weeks, NASA's Security Operations Center (SOC) mitigation tools have prevented success of these attempts. Here are some examples of what's been observed in the past few days:

  • Doubling of email phishing attempts
  • Exponential increase in malware attacks on NASA systems
  • Double the number of mitigation-blocking of NASA systems trying to access malicious sites (often unknowingly) due to users accessing the Internet

Here's another article that makes basically the same points I did:

But the rapid shift to remote working will inevitably create or exacerbate gaps in security. Employees using unfamiliar software will get settings wrong and leave themselves open to breaches. Staff forced to use their own ageing laptops from home will find their data to be less secure than those using modern equipment.

That's a big problem because the security issues are not going away. For the last couple of months coronavirus-themed malware and phishing scams have been on the rise. Business email compromise scams -- where crooks impersonate a CEO or other senior staff member and then try to trick workers into sending money to their accounts -- could be made easier if staff primarily rely on email to communicate while at home.

EDITED TO ADD: This post has been translated into Portuguese.

EDITED TO ADD (4/13): A three-part series about home-office cybersecurity.

EDITED TO ADD: This post has been translated into Spanish.

Posted on April 7, 2020 at 10:00 AM • 46 Comments

Comments

Clive RobinsonApril 7, 2020 10:54 AM

@ Bruce,

You forgot,

6, Homeworkers understandably seeking information on COVID-19 to protect them and their families are ending up at sites that have the likes of interactive maps that hide malware, downloaders or RATS.

wiredogApril 7, 2020 12:16 PM

Things are moving fast. Faster than politicians or bureaucrats (including the ones in corporations) can keep up. Heck, consider the problems Zoom has had scaling up users by a couple orders in magnitude.

It was just a month ago that SxSW was cancelled.

Clive RobinsonApril 7, 2020 1:48 PM

@ wiredog,

Things are moving fast. Faster than politicians or bureaucrats (including the ones in corporations) can keep up.

And in other ways as well, society and work are going to change...

If the current problem plays out the way experts expect then three years from now we will probably be in the last major wave of the disease. During that time lockdowns will repeatedly happen for each wave.

Many people in enforced lockdown but incapable of working because either their jobs can not be done at home or they work in a social supporting job such as the service industry will find that they are going to have to do other things.

You can bet either the first or last dollar in your wallet that industrial employers ar looking at "automation technology" to avoid another lookdown issue, and you can bet the other dollar that the Government will support them just to stop the economy collapsing.

You will hear politicians talking about jobs, but that will just be window dressing as it always has been in the past. Further due to repeated lockdowns local shops etc will cease to exist. The only issue for the corporations is "delivery" well I'll give you a clue, it will by necesity replace humans who will be increasingly seen as disease vectors. Those driverless "cars" will be in reality "driverless delivery". Likewise taxis and other transportation.

Which means something like a third of those sitting at home right now will realise that either they have to change or society will have to change...

Right now a percentage of those working from home, are going to consider other work or money streams. They will realise that they don't need to spend one third of their twelve hour or longer days traveling too and from work needlessly risking their health and life. The physical office will become less and less important. The owners of those monstrosity buildings will find that getting tenants will be difficult and the "business districts" will remain as quiet if not quiter than they are now.

Homes with an extra room to work in and not in some block of boxes will become desirable, those who are quick and smart will move right out of the city and suburbs, even beyond urban living into mixed life style of "home farming and teleworking". Children will be increasingly taught at home. We've already seen University Classes go "on-line" all it will take is "exams on line".

Thus the homeworkers will need reliable secure and private communications. This will put them head to head with old style conservative thinking or neo-con types. But even more interesting between one third and half those working in offices currently are actually doing "makework", that is work without actuall purpose. It is an existance of drudgery that makes the old style myths of pits of hell look like fun in comparison. Such makework comes about as a side effect of empire building and similar pointless endevers. It realy only exists because of working in office blocks and service industries. People working from home do not need makework workers. Worse other types of work such as office cleaners, maintainence staff etc will not be needed either... Where will they go what will they do?

How it all plays out is for us to see the start of and hopefully our children will reap the benifit of.

A dubious personApril 7, 2020 3:18 PM

@Mod: "John Smith" appears to be shilling some quasi-medical supplies here. (Ironically demonstrating OGH's point? How very meta!)

QApril 7, 2020 3:34 PM

I love how Clive Robinson's name has inherited the link from the previous spammers post.

JonKnowsNothingApril 7, 2020 5:45 PM

@Clive @Bruce @All

re: malware linked is to Clive's name field but the date field has the proper comment link.

Oh.. this I hope is going to be educational..

'cause as a non-security professional I have had to deal with websites as an admin where things went pear shaped. Some junk I was able to clean up but there was a whole other level of stuff that was so entrenched we had to abandon the site totally.

What was curious and stupefying was that neither the web hosting company nor the anti-virus-malware firm we had contracted with would give us any support at all. It was fixit yourself - too bad - so sad.

*fwiw: we rebuilt on another service provider, made 100% sweep of everything that went up and cleaned out any suspect items. Now, years later, it's pretty clear that we could never really keep have the junk out long term because the hosting and site programs are like The Leaky Cauldron.

JonKnowsNothingApril 7, 2020 6:59 PM

@Clive
re:

But even more interesting between one third and half those working in offices currently are actually doing "makework", that is work without actuall purpose.

Over the last years, I've been following the on-going saga of programs called CentreLink, RoboDebt, Zombie Debt, New Start, Job Seeker, Universal Credit Benefits Coordination System (not to be confused with a basic standard of income) and the USA counterparts.

The hallmark of these programs are that they are all derived from the Neo-Liberalism-Libertarian economic systems where poorer people are only of value if they provide wealth to already wealthy people. The old "God blesses the rich and pizzs on the poor who are unworthy" belief systems.

I am not all that positive that such views of young, older, infirm, elderly, disabled or otherwise different people are going to get much shrift in the New-Post-COVID Economy.

The Neo-Libs are already frantic that their place in the 1% of wealth-ownership is in danger of slipping. Some places are demanding that people return to work, continue to work or work while sick (with COVID19). It rather shows how little they value their workers when 10-15 days later said worker is incapacitated or dead.

I remember a comment from ages past about the population of India and why they were so poor overall. It was not from a lack of work. There was loads of work. It was just the work paid very little. It was that there were so many desperate people willing to race to the labor-price bottom.

We could already see this same dynamic expanding into the so-called Gig Economy. A race to work for nothing. Your life, family, aspirations are irrelevant. Company Towns and Company Controls. A Shape-Up and Shake-Down which we see now daily. Reports that in China some workers were returned to their factories and were locked-in with dormitory space in the factory complex.

As corporations move to replace humans with additional automation, there will be an serious increase in the under-employed, unemployed and unemployable(not unskilled, marked as do not hire).

While the NeoLiberals fume over the current economy, we are collectively learning what all we Do Not Need and No Longer Want. All those new robots turning out products who's buyers will only be other members of the 1%.

It may be that a more equalitarian system will pop up over the next 3 years; I would not expect the 1% to give up their place that easily, even though they would still be in the 1%.

If you view people not of your class, wealth base, education base, technical base, opportunity base, as "not worthy", history shows that this is a hard concept to overcome. The UK history of strikes and miners strikes and India's Independence strikes, including the Colonies anti-stamp act strikes, show that it's very hard going.

This cycle of change and resistance is repeated in nearly every part of the globe, historically and currently.

When enough people walk out of Amazon Warehouses EnMass for a week... maybe THAT would be something that would shake the tree.



disclaimer: I am not part of the UK Commonwealth or UK, so my understanding of the programs may be less than optimal.

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism or neo-liberalism[1] is the 20th-century resurgence of 19th-century ideas associated with laissez-faire economic liberalism and free market capitalism
Not to be confused with Social Liberal Policies.

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Company_town

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mill_town

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centrelink

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newstart_Allowance

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jobseeker%27s_Allowance

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Credit

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phantom_debt

Phantom debt or zombie debt is a debt that is old, defaulted, or not owed and is somehow haunting the presumed debtor. It generally refers to debt that is more than 3 years old, is long forgotten about or belonged to someone else – like someone with the same name or a deceased parent. The amount owed can grow to hundreds or thousands of dollars more than what was originally owed.

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_labor

see references to: "obtained work through a shapeup in which bosses chose a workforce on a daily basis. Longshoremen often worked only a day or less per week as a consequence."

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extortion

Extortion (also called shakedown, and, in a legal sense incorrectly, exaction) is obtaining benefit through coercion

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stamp_Act_1765
(url fractured to prevent autorun)

NotMYNormalNomdePlumeApril 7, 2020 9:20 PM

Friend in foreign country. Laid off of Job. Made less than $400 month.

No government help and no corporate help. The majority of the company itself is based in the USA, Europe and Canada.

The company is making them attend unpaid work meetings and training seminars using the internet they somehow have to pay for and a home where they have to pay rent - without any salary - remote training just in case their company decides to hire them back part time at some future unspecified date when international travel restrictions are lifted.

1st world countries’ corporations exhibiting ‘top exploitation mode’ where they had once only exploited global wage arbitrage.

Some of these countries will have pockets of ‘every man for themselves’ in several months. Race to the bottom to work at any price is like negative interest rates. Working for less than free. You pay to work with no hope of recovering those lost wages. Your companion hunger pains and terror at your future.

The sad thing is that the job allowed for government subsidized health care to be extended to their immediate family. Now they have nothing in case of disease. Contract Sars-Covid2? Hope you have natural immunity or natural talent at fending it off.

My buddy has told me of a large company that is sending out nearly a thousand new laptops sourced directly from a big three vendor. Nothing but the O/S and admin rights granted to all users to make it ‘easy’ to set up with antivirus as the first best and only defense.

That company was not prepared with a BCP nor had they ever performed a disaster recovery test with their users. They decided not to enforce the creation of limited user access accounts. He and his team decided not to continue his consulting gig as they could not guarantee they wouldn’t be breached within 120 days.

A recipe for disaster.

lurkerApril 7, 2020 9:38 PM

@Clive

Which means something like a third of those sitting at home right now will realise that either they have to change or society will have to change...
Mmhuh, you must have heard that, like I did, some fifty years ago: the robots will do all menial and manual work, and we will have so much more leisure time. I've been pondering for half a century and am still no nearer the answer to: How will we obtain the wherewithall to enjoy this leisure time if we're not earning it?

La AbejaApril 7, 2020 9:52 PM

"The coronavirus is infecting and killing black Americans at an alarmingly high rate"

www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/04/07/coronavirus-is-infecting-killing-black-americans-an-alarmingly-high-rate-post-analysis-shows/

The MSM has the racism angle covered really well, don't they? That's the Mafia, all right.

La AbejaApril 7, 2020 10:33 PM

Birx says government is classifying all deaths of patients with coronavirus as 'COVID-19' deaths, regardless of cause

www.foxnews.com/politics/birx-says-government-is-classifying-all-deaths-of-patients-with-coronavirus-as-covid-19-deaths-regardless-of-cause

They're Nazis, shooting for plausible deniability for their usual mass murder schemes.

It's like I got the flu, doc decided I needed emergency surgery, the doc knifed my carotid artery and bled me to death, and doc's buddy the coroner tells the jury I died of the flu.

WinterApril 8, 2020 1:49 AM

@Clive
"If the current problem plays out the way experts expect then three years from now we will probably be in the last major wave of the disease."

In a year or so, there will be a vaccine and/or a drug that prevents the worst of COVID-19. Then lock-downs will not be necessary.


Examples of disinformation campaigns:
"Birx says government is classifying all deaths of patients with coronavirus as 'COVID-19' deaths, regardless of cause"

I recently learned that there are people in the UK destroying mobile towers because they are convinced 5G is linked to the corona virus outbreak.
https://www.businessinsider.com/coronavirus-5g-conspiracy-theory-england-cellphone-masts-engineers-attacked-2020-4?international=true&r=US&IR=T

I think this type of disinformation campaigns are even more damaging than all the cybersecurity stuff. And how to classify a country where the president denies medical supplies to those who voted for the opposition?

There is a this famous quote:
"There are two infinities, the universe and human stupidity, and I am not sure about the universe."

COVID-19 proves this point again and again and again.

Clive RobinsonApril 8, 2020 2:42 AM

@ lurker,

Mmhuh, you must have heard that, like I did, some fifty years ago: the robots will do all menial and manual work, and we will have so much more leisure time.

Those stories started before that look up what the word "robot" originaly ment and you will find (wikipedia),

Czech word, robota, meaning "forced labor";[6] the word 'robot' was first used to denote a fictional humanoid in a 1920 play R.U.R. (Rossumovi Univerzální Roboti - Rossum's Universal Robots) by the Czech writer, Karel Čapek but it was Karel's brother Josef Čapek who was the word's true inventor.

The "forced labor" element is what realy tells you what is going on it's "slavery" or if you prefer "slave labour wages".

You can be sure as with "self checkout tills" that as the technology gets cheaper the human labour will be reduced untill they are "Guard labour / cleaners" who are there to shine the glass plate and shout at "shoplifters".

You will note I actually did not talk about what would happen to those who could not "work from home". Under most non European countries they will be left to fend for themselves... You can look at what is happening now to see "the excuses" as to why human labour will be replaced with mechanical labour...

The history of the word "sabotage" might also be worth looking at, it derives from the word "sabot" which is not "an artillery round" but the French word for a "clog" or "wooden shoe" that were thrown or kicked into early "automation" machines. Thus the word is almost directly the replacment for the more modern English phrase of "Sticking the boot in".

It is this sort of "social change" that is feared and one reason why untrained people are given uniforms and guns and orders to shoot. If you think people will not do it take a historical look at the "Rhine transit Camps" the US set up after WWII. Officialy called "Rheinwiesenlager" they were effectively "death camps" there was no accomadation, shelter or any sanitation, food was deliberately kept down to starvation levels (1200 to 1500 calories) and served in a way that would cause fights and other violence. The US forces running these camps gave guns to the strongest and most violent prisoners and better food, their only job to keep the prisoners locked up and shoot if they were a problem...

If you look at the output of many "Think Tanks" on labour that is not productive "camps" are amost always the suggested "temporary" solution. A look at German history in the 1930's shows that they were used by businese men to force down wages increase hours of skilled workers and they would then hire back from the German authorities workers for next to nothing.

Which is why I suspect there is going to be "Social Change" because with "Disaster Capitalism" a return to "the old ways" of "The lord in his Castle and the surf in the dirt" look good. Because the thing about surfs is they are cheaper to run than "slaves".

The thing is at the end of the day nobody tends to think about the question of "What happens to the economy" the simple answer is it colapses. The reason is that what gives the economy it's forward momentum is "debt" you borrow from the future to pay for the present and it's always assumed that inflation will in effect make your payment less (it's why the "D" word scares economists and others). However most avoid the question of "who are our customers?"... If wages are driven down then your end customers have no money in their pockets, so they don't buy your goods, or they start playing the "debt" game as well. Either way the end result is the same "nobody wins as the bubble bursts". So you get "social change" again.

Eventually people realise that things are better for all if there are jobs with sufficient wages to be customers so the dance can continue. Ask anyone who lived in Europe post WWII through to the end of the 1960's and then ask why did Neil Armstorong's boot touching the surface of the Moon effectively mark the start of the decline?

WinterApril 8, 2020 3:19 AM

@Clive
"Because the thing about surfs is they are cheaper to run than "slaves"."

I am totally for wave driven power production, but somehow, I got the impression you meant "serfs".

What you are describing is the undoing of Neo-Liberalism. It has become clear that Neo-Liberalism and laisser-fair capitalism lead to all money ending up in one or a few heaps. The reflex of the "serfs" has always been to attack minorities (pogroms of the past). So that is what you see now.

But it has become clear that Neo-Liberalism does in no way make everyone rich, on the contrary.

The classical question to ask a Neo-liberal is simply:
What if we had a machine that could create anything for next to no cost. Would all this wealth be distributed, or would everyone but the owners of the machine live in abject poverty?

The answer in the Anglo Saxon world is the latter. They predict the serfs you mention.

In the non-Anglo-Saxon world, the discourse has shifted towards how to redistribute the wealth more equally. Whether that will be successful is a different matter.

As we look at how the European countries battle the disruption caused by the pandemic and contrast that to the responses in the USA, it becomes clear that the Neo-liberal strip mining of society in the USA has left the country crippled. There are millions of unemployed and sick people with no structures left to care for them. The USA as a federation looks quite strongly as a giant on clay feet. Some states are advanced industrial societies that will weather this crisis, but many states are third world countries in disguise. They will suffer dearly.

When people run for their guns instead of their neighbors, the future of you country looks very bleak.

Clive RobinsonApril 8, 2020 3:51 AM

@ Winter,

In a year or so, there will be a vaccine and/or a drug that prevents the worst of COVID-19. Then lock-downs will not be necessary.

Err sorry the short answer is "NO" there won't be...

It's something that kind of annoys me is "future assumptions based on false premises" that are then held out as "a light at the end of the tunnel" it's like the old joke of "Free beer tomorrow".

There is a reason why we don't have vaccines for most viral diseases especially those that are endemic. And also why the flu vaccine frequently does not work. I won't go into it, but just accept the fact that well over 90% of attempts to make vaccines fail usually very early on.

You then have to go through a testing process for efficacy and safety. A vaccine for a virulent pathogen is fairly pointless if it only works for nine out of ten people, or it kills one out of a thousand people. With "best estimate" putting the test process at 18months the assumption is that one of the thirty candidates "will be the charm" well the odds are in reality not that good, based on the history of vaccines you might be waiting over a quater of a century for a viable vaccine.

But even if a vaccine is "a charm" you are in reality no better off after that 18 months than you were before. Because you have yet to make it and get it into people. If the economy was functioning as it was say a year ago you would be looking at another 18months to three years to get the vaccine into production and supplies would be limited to those that could afford the vaccine, which is unlikely to be many. Eventually the manufacturing capacity would ramp up but that might take five to ten years more. Then there is the issue of trained medical staff transportation and many many other resources all of which have to be payed for somehow.

With a flatlining economy where are the resources going to come from, we don't even have 0.25% of the resources to make test kits for seven and a half billion people.

All we can realistically do is "lockdown" to get control, and reduce the incidence bellow the threshold that our healthcare systems can rational support without killing the healthcare staff by disease, fatigue or suicide.

Then in the process of that implement strong testing and tracing and mandatory quarantine, lock our borders and hope we can stop all of the hundreds of flare ups so that the lockdown can stay lifted. It's what Taiwan and to a lesser extent South Korea has done

The problem is as I've pointed out JIT / LEAN long supply lines and no certainty that you will get access to product.

Nearly everything needed to move forward on SARS-CoV-2 is 100% reliant on China and India, whilst China appears to be moving forward India is about to disappear down the rabbit hole and their politicians have made it clear "India First" applies. With half a billion people living little more than a hand to mouth effectively slum lifestyle due to "market forces" it's likely their economy will compleatly tank and production will fall below even India's needs.

We've done this to ourselves, and I've been warning about it for a quater of a century one way or another. What we do in the next thirty to sixty days will shap the world future for many generations. A number of people who advise governments know this, but you and I will be told what are "fairytails" by governments like "We're on top of it", "it will be over before Easter", "Less deaths than flu", "Maybe 200000 dead" and so on and so on.

The reality is we will have a major food crisis in less than a year and Western nations that do not do something about it now will have people starving to death.

Then we will see the real fun start, which is "bid to live". You may of heard that France had ordered millions of masks, they had been manufactured and were at the airport ready to be flown out. Then some gentalmen from the US turned up with a truck full of cash and paid double the price for those masks...

That's what "bid to live" will entail amongst other things goverments will get into market manipulations and profiteering big style "behind the curtain" whilst the "front of house people" will get the old "We do not do business with terrorists" line...

The only thing you can have faith in is

    In what you can do, with that you already have, that you can stop being taken away from you.

And when you consider what Governments have done and will do further by legislation and then like others at the point of a gun, that's not a lot... Remember power has it's privileges, and the higher up the hierarchy the less dirty your hands have to get.

If you don't believe that will happen just listen to those in the Whitehouse talking about the "Stratigic Reserves" with the word "we" meaning "ours" and the US States who's people paid for everything in that reserve and it's storage being told they will have to pay again that is to make "bids to live"...

WinterApril 8, 2020 5:15 AM

@Clive
"There is a reason why we don't have vaccines for most viral diseases especially those that are endemic. And also why the flu vaccine frequently does not work. I won't go into it, but just accept the fact that well over 90% of attempts to make vaccines fail usually very early on."

First, corona viruses are different from influenza viruses. For one thing, they mutate much less fast.

What you say is not true for COVID, as all the experts are saying. For instance, there have been developed SARS vaccine candidates that were never deployed after the epidemic was stopped.
http://www.pharmatimes.com/news/sanofi_to_repurpose_sars_vaccine_candidate_for_coronavirus_1326473

A vaccine is not sure, but very likely to be available within two years. As with HIV, a drug that stops the worst effects of the virus is also likely to be developed soon.

"You then have to go through a testing process for efficacy and safety."

Indeed, but with a few trillion on the line, these hurdles will be overcome quite fast. The experts expect development to take 18 months, but if pressure is put on it, that can be reduced.

"All we can realistically do is "lockdown" to get control, and reduce the incidence bellow the threshold that our healthcare systems can rational support without killing the healthcare staff by disease, fatigue or suicide."

Most countries are working very hard to expand their healthcare systems' carrying capacity. That will take a few months, but people are working very hard. A few trillion euro's on the line do help in motivating.

@Clive
"What we do in the next thirty to sixty days will shap the world future for many generations. A number of people who advise governments know this, but you and I will be told what are "fairytails" by governments like "We're on top of it", "it will be over before Easter", "Less deaths than flu", "Maybe 200000 dead" and so on and so on."

The fairy tales are totally on the populist sides. Most non-populist governments have reacted, sometimes late, with effective measures and they do have implemented long lasting policies. And, more important, they have NOT told fairy tales about the virus. It is only nationalists and libertarians who cannot deal with a global crisis of any kind, let alone a pandemic.

All Western European governments are telling it like it is: This will take time and a lot of patience, and we are in it together. The same in Canada and East-Asia. Only the American Bolzenaro is still in denial, but that is because he does not care at all what happens.

But I understand Trump was deeply shocked by the fact that a prime minister, Boris, could contract the virus and end up in hospital.

@Clive
"Then we will see the real fun start, which is "bid to live". You may of heard that France had ordered millions of masks, they had been manufactured and were at the airport ready to be flown out. Then some gentalmen from the US turned up with a truck full of cash and paid double the price for those masks..."

It does teaches us whom to trust. The Chinese do send us medical supplies. But this does bring about Trump's goal: Isolationism. IF everyone leaves the USA aside, that is what he wants.

@Clive
"And when you consider what Governments have done and will do further by legislation and then like others at the point of a gun, that's not a lot... Remember power has it's privileges, and the higher up the hierarchy the less dirty your hands have to get."

That really depends where you are. Some countries do not hesitate to help out the poorest, both practically and financially. Other are "everyone for themselves".

And I am sure, Neo-liberalism is losing the last bits of its appeal.

Clive RobinsonApril 8, 2020 7:26 AM

@ Winter,

The experts expect development to take 18 months, but if pressure is put on it, that can be reduced.

I'm not sure who these experts might be, but lets assume the wind does blow favourably and in a years time we have an assumed safe and efficacious vaccine approved.

What then?

We currently do not have the ability to make it, distribute it or get it into peoples arms.

Look how long it took to get small pox eradicated and that was easier because there was a world will to do so. Polio could have been eradicated but, it has not, the will went, the money went, inoculation of the vaccine slowed and polio has started to move forwards again.

Lets say from the medical side we get the best possible vaccine. It may not be effective to manufacture, it might be too costly for all but a few. But what about the feed stock, where is that going to come from, we have a shortage of swabs for testing currently and some estimates put it as being a decade before we do with current supply bottle necks.

Where are we going to get the necessary inoculation equipment, yes there are designs for new fancy inoculation patches using sugar crystals as the needles to get through the skin but will they work effectively. Again where are we going to get the machines and feed stock to make such things, how long to setup and train workers then healthcare staff etc.

You are looking at half a decade away to be effectively up and running even if we get on a war footing. By then we will have probably had four or five waves of the virus and by which time the virus will in all probability mutated or become extinct. So who bares the cost of making the vaccine?

Trust me on this it won't be big pharma, or any other Corporation for that matter, it needs many governments to throw money into the near bottomless pit that big pharma will make it. As for the current crop of politicians they don't have good will to their citizens let alone those of other nations. They will be looking for "leverage" those thirty vaccines will be the cause of much nationalism as you can see coming out of Israel, they all want their solution to be the only solution...

Have a look at why the chief scientist to the EU has just resigned...

As for Boris Johnson, well he ignored the scientists and had tried to keep the real figures covered up, I'm guessing that there will be others talking of their national leaders in similar ways. Some might say that Boris got what he diserved, but trust me nobody wants to die gasping for every last breath till either fatigue or sepsis gets them, nor would I wish it on people.

As for the 5G nonsense, you can find videos online of overhead pylons with arking insulators and people saying it's 5G. I would not be supprised to see people taking their pets and children to vets and doctors respectively and asking "Do you think it could be 5G"... The joke behind it all is that 5G has not even been turned on in the places where people are blaiming it. I wonder if I put a pole up in the street and stuck a 5G symbol on it how long it would be before they started complaining and saying "It's that damn 5G mast".

It's like modern day witchcraft trials and just as scientific...

That's what Western Politicians have done for us, they treat science at best in a cavilear way and then others see science as being something evil... Luckily for them shouting "5G" or spraying it on walls is within their capabilities unlike "witchcraft" or wondering how many Zs there are in "Wizard" even though they finger traced their way through Harry Potter...

WinterApril 8, 2020 9:08 AM

@Clive
"I'm not sure who these experts might be, "

Fauci gave this timeline.
Also:
https://www.wcjb.com/content/news/COVID-19-vaccine-expected-in-over-a-year-569328051.html

and:
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/04/why-a-coronavirus-vaccine-takes-over-a-year-to-produce-and-why-that-is-incredibly-fast/

@Clive
"We currently do not have the ability to make it, distribute it or get it into peoples arms."

If you had asked me 4 months ago whether it would be possible to make 4 billion people stay home and avoid human contact as much as possible, I would have said that would be impossible. And a 2 trillion dollar stimulus package in the USA where every adult get $1000 for free would have been unthinkable. Still, here we are.

There is much more possible than we think if people really want it.

We actually do have the structures in place to vaccinate every child in the world against polio. Only open warfare and human stupidity have prevented the eradication of polio. Compared to the lockdown, a vaccination campaign is a walk in the park. This crisis is costing the world trillions of euros, literally. A few billion will be easily found to produce and distribute the vaccine.

" But what about the feed stock, where is that going to come from,"

We do not yet know what will work, but some of the candidate vaccines are mRNA and DNA strands. Apple are making face masks for health care personnel. If the needs arise, car factories can produce ICU ventilators.

" Some might say that Boris got what he diserved, "

Not me. No one deserves to die for his or her convictions, believes, or stupidity.


My point is, when it is technical possible, and I admit, this is a big if, and it helps getting 4B people out of lockdown and stopping hemorrhaging trillions of euros, it will happen.

JonKnowsNothingApril 8, 2020 11:04 AM

@Winter @Clive

re:

The classical question to ask a Neo-liberal is simply:

What if we had a machine that could create anything for next to no cost.
Would all this wealth be distributed, or would everyone but the owners of the machine live in abject poverty?

First, this is a "thought experiment" and is not a very realistic one, or even useful in the current context of COVID19 survival and Post-COVID19 Economics.

The primary reason is that like TANSTAAFL:

There is no such thing as a NO COST Something.

While you, me and other survivors may be able to hole up for the next 20-50 years, all those raw materials, stuff like: food, chemicals, minerals that are needed for the current levels of disproportionate wealth come from somewhere and made somehow. And when you are done with the food, chemicals and converted raw materials, they go somewhere and somehow. It's a closed system with finite resources: Garbage IN and Garbage OUT.

The only aspect it addresses is: Labor or Manpower.

You cannot make NOTHING into SOMETHING
You cannot make SOMETHING into NOTHING

Part of our current planetary global economic problems are that the costs of "something" are not fully accounted for in Neoliberalism Economics. The premise is that "raw materials" are "free to acquire" and "end products" are "fee to dispose of". The mountains of our trashed "fee materials" already overwhelms the planet. Asking NeoLiberal Economists to incorporate these costs would negate their entire economic system and theories of wealth transfer.

They ain't gonna do that, any time soon.

re: Fauci and Trump

The writing is on the wall. An economist is making the calls.

Peter Navarro said he was qualified to debate use of hydroxychloroquine because he has a PhD – in economics

and this tidbit:

In an extraordinary row that highlights the tensions being wrought within the EU’s institutions by the health crisis, the board of the European Research council issued a damning statement about the man they chose to lead them three months ago.

The ERC’s scientific council said Mauro Ferrari resigned on Tuesday evening and made his damaging claims after being told to leave by the 19-strong board on Friday.

The council went on to say that the Italian scientist had not engaged sufficiently with his job, spent too much time in America where he had a laboratory, and had gone over the heads of the ERC board to talk to the European commission president, Ursula von der Leyen.

The USA just saw another incarnation of this over the fate the crew of the USS Theodore Roosevelt when an urgent request for COVID19 care lead to the dismissal of its captain with all the ugliness the Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly could spit into the microphone. Mr Modly is no longer Acting Secretary of the Navy. Captain Crozier along with many of his now ex-crew are sick with COVID19.

These are Neo-Liberal Policies coming into play. They are not in the least bit interested in a vaccine for me or you. They may not be interested in a vaccine for other members of the 1% Country Clubs. They are only interested if it works for them and if they can extract wealth from the production.

So, how much are you willing to pay?

Testing for COVID19 isn't free in the USA.
10 days in the ICU isn't free in the USA.
Rehab for 1,2,3... years is not free in the USA.

How much will you bid for your personal chance to get it?



ht tps://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/apr/06/peter-navarro-fauci-hydroxychloroquine

ht tps://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/08/eu-most-senior-scientist-mauro-ferrari-resigns-handling-coronavirus-crisis

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/There_ain%27t_no_such_thing_as_a_free_lunch
(url fractured to prevent autorun)

MarkHApril 8, 2020 11:49 AM

@Clive:

Usually, I'm loath to interrupt someone who's wallowing in a slough of cynicism ... I know how good it can feel!

Everything I know about vaccine development I could write on a very small piece of paper ... but people who have successfully developed vaccines have been speaking, and I'm inclined to assume that they know whereof they speak.

I agree with much of what you say. It could be more difficult than anybody knows today; there might be something about this particular virus that defeats the best efforts; it could take a lot longer than the estimates; scaling up production is likely to be an enormous effort, and who knows how much time it will take; etc.

What I keep hearing, is that the lack of vaccines for various categories of virus is mainly economic. Vaccine development is enormously costly (roughly USD one billion), and capitalist enterprise won't spend a penny that isn't expected to return that penny plus at least a few percent more.

To frustrate the "common cold" for example, it would be necessary to develop vaccines effective against at least dozens of different viruses, and nobody expects that sales of such a (necessarily partially effective) vaccine would repay the R&D in an economically reasonable time frame.

Reportedly, a substantial effort was under way to develop a vaccine against SARS-Cov-1. When that virus was effectively eradicated (for a few years, at least), the financial incentive to continue the work disappeared.

As to polio, it appears to me that it could have been, and still might be, eradicated. What I have read over the years, is that in some large poor populations (particularly in southern Asia) the weakness of medical infrastructure, and popular distrust of vaccination campaigns, have been persistent obstacles. As winter mentioned, warfare is also a grave problem: when social functioning has broken down and people are shooting each other, keeping up vaccination programs is unlikely.

An important difference between smallpox and polio is that its worst effects are comparatively rare: 0.5% of cases result in enduring paralysis, and perhaps 0.03% are fatal.

In spite of all this, worldwide "wild" polio cases (that is, those not resulting from vaccination itself) have fallen by a factor of more than 3000 since 1988.
______________________________

In 1941, the Soviet Union loaded the key productive apparatus of entire factories onto railroad cars and relocated them eastward. The government which accomplished this was neither particularly enlightened, nor motivated by a tender concern for the welfare of its people.

Major economies are now hemorrhaging trillions of dollars per month. They won't allocate tens, or even hundreds of billions to development of medical techniques needed to resume economic functioning? Are you SURE about that?

JonKnowsNothingApril 8, 2020 12:41 PM

@MarkH @Clive

As discussed sometime in the recent past: African Swine Fever outbreak continues

An outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) was confirmed on Monday on a farm near the village of Więckowice near Poznań in western Poland, less than 150km (93 miles) from the border with Germany.

over 10,000 piglets on the farm that will have to be culled

There is an ongoing outbreak in China that has already already wiped out 40% of pigs in the country.

“China is still having very, very serious problems with African swine fever and the government has done absolutely nothing that has been effective,” said Wayne Johnson, a veterinarian at farm services company Enable Agricultural Technology Consulting, who is based in Beijing.

“They could have stopped it early but they did nothing,” said Johnson. “They even forbade people to test for it. There are pigs going to the slaughterhouse every day with ASF. They don’t clean the trucks. The local governments refused to diagnose it as African swine fever, because if they did, they would have to pay an indemnity since the law is that they now have to pay if the farm has ASF.”

It has also passed into the wild boar-pig population. Many countries struggle with feral pigs and how to control their populations. These now become a reservoir for future outbreaks.

As the virus may survive 11 days in pig faeces, and months or years in pork products.

Many similarities to our current Human Pandemic. Illustrating the difficulties developing a viable vaccine even with the impetus of global market economics. COVID19 is one strain right now, without eradication new strains are likely to develop.



ht tps://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/apr/08/african-swine-fever-outbreak-reported-in-western-poland

ht tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_swine_fever_virus

of African swine fever (ASF). The virus causes a hemorrhagic fever with high mortality rates in domestic pigs; some isolates can cause death of animals as quickly as a week after infection.

The first outbreak was retrospectively recognized as having occurred in 1907.

As of 2020, no vaccine is commercially available.

(url fractured to prevent autorun)

A dubious personApril 8, 2020 2:06 PM

@Q, @Clive, @Bruce:

Good one, I hadn't noticed that the spam post's unterminated href "ate" Clive's name! Cute bug in your blog software, Bruce - you might want to do something about it.

And a thought about working from home...

Basically, companies who are requiring their employees to work from home during COVID lockdown are either introducing, or dramatically expanding, a BYOD policy that is guaranteed to be dangerously lax. I'm kind of glad I'm "between careers" right now, otherwise I would have some very pointed (and probably career-limiting) things to say about the wisdom of this.

I have worked for exactly one company in the 25+ years since everybody (more or less) was on the Internet that had a meaningful policy about security requirements for any machine that connected to their network. Of course this was years before every phone and teddy bear ran a TCP/IP stack, and I still had to spend a couple of days cleaning up 30+ lab servers after a VP infested us with SQL Slammer. But at least they HAD a policy and were willing to enforce it widely.

Clive RobinsonApril 8, 2020 9:36 PM

@ JonKnowsNothing,

As discussed sometime in the recent past: African Swine Fever outbreak continues.

Yes, it's one of the reasons I'm telling people to stock up on meat for both their freezer[1] and canned etc because it's going to be a big contribution to food shortages in the near future.

[1] It's wise to never eat frozen cooked pork or "fresh pork" but to freeze it raw for at least a month before cooking and eating. If you must cook fresh pork it's best to use a preasure cooker as this heats the flesh to more than 100C. That way you kill certain parasites that can not just live in the pork flesh but survive cooking and then eat into you via your digestive tract...

SpaceLifeFormApril 8, 2020 9:56 PM

@ A dubious person, @Q, @Clive, @Bruce

It is not a bug in the software except that it allows a non-terminated html anchor.

"John Smith", aka, the spammer, left out the </a> tag, so the anchor did not close until the next post by clive, when the software created the new anchor for the specific post URL.

You can see that because the Bullet is part of the same anchor. Mouse-over the Bullet. Do a view source in your browser.

When the spam post is deleted, the issue will disappear.

Note the spammer also included

rel="nofollow"

in the anchor.


Clive RobinsonApril 8, 2020 10:04 PM

@ Winter,

The first of your links gives one of the big problems which is to do with "animal testing"... We have not yet identified a test species to use where a SARS-CoV-2 inoculated animal will follow the same or similar pathways to humans. It's a bit difficult to do the animal test phase required before the human test phase without an appropriate animal.

The second link does not mention the animal test phase at all and goes into the various phases of the human trials. To be honest I would not want to be a human guinea pig unless, well a real guinea pig had gone first.

There is a massive risk with human trials even after animal testing, you could quickly go into a form of shock and die of multiple organ failure and sepsis. There was a trial in the UK several years back where this went horribly wrong. But worse it might be a number of years till you find out it caused cancer or other long term later life conditions.

But the second link skimmed over the manufacturing difficulties.

We can agree to disagre but I'm not putting any faith in a vaccine being in my arm in less than five years... Which means we will almost certainly get waves of infection working their way through the population.

Personally I would like it to be a lot less than five years, but I don't think it will be...

Lets just hope we survive long enough to find out if I'm right or wrong.

SpaceLifeFormApril 9, 2020 2:02 AM

Zoom in court.

Not as defendant. Yet.

Some Tidbits from lawyer.


https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1247916490021416961.html

/2 Looks like they are having the defendants appear by Zoom from jail.

/5 It's easily the most unusual criminal calendar call I have ever seen.

For one thing all the prosecutors were here on time.

/8 The judge and all the lawyers are handling this very well. Impressed. This can work.

[next part, my ears stood up]

/11 Court and sheriff have arranged for a separate confidential channel for remote attorneys to have private conferences with clients. No, I would not use it for anything actually confidential, but to explain what's happening, maybe.


SpaceLifeFormApril 9, 2020 2:36 AM

@ JonKnowsNothing

"The only aspect it addresses is: Labor or Manpower.

You cannot make NOTHING into SOMETHING
You cannot make SOMETHING into NOTHING"

Former is Sales and Marketing
Latter is Board of Directors, CEO

"John Smith" is all of the above.

"John Smith", aka the spammer.

His website, well, in the 'products' directory, it is 'Lorem ipsum'.

There are NO products.

BTW, I did NOT visit the website. DDG told me that. They crawled it just enough to provide the info.


SpaceLifeFormApril 9, 2020 2:59 AM

@ Clive

"We have not yet identified a test species to use where a SARS-CoV-2 inoculated animal will follow the same or similar pathways to humans. It's a bit difficult to do the animal test phase required before the human test phase without an appropriate animal."

From 2008 SARS study.

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1354/vp.45-4-551

In conclusion, our study shows that SARS-CoV infections in cats and ferrets are suitable models for studying the pathology and pathogenesis of human SARS. We also have identified tracheo-broncho-adenitis in cats as a novel SARS-CoV–induced lesion, which could potentially occur in human SARS and affect the pathogenesis and virus excretion of this disease.

Clive RobinsonApril 9, 2020 8:18 AM

@ SpaceLifeForm,

I was under the impression the feline genus had been rulled out due to lack of lower respiritory path.

A dubious personApril 9, 2020 2:57 PM

@ Moderator: the previous posting from "andrew" is an advertisement for illegal services.

A dubious personApril 9, 2020 4:23 PM

@ SpaceLifeForm:

I absolutely call the "allow-unterminated-anchor-element" behavior a bug, because - as demonstrated right here - it can be used to exploit a feature of the blog system, that being the ability to link your handle to a URL. "John Smith"'s presumed mistake implicitly attributes a web presence to Clive Robinson that I'm sure Clive neither deserves nor appreciates.

I don't think this is what "John Smith" intended, otherwise "he" might not have included any visible text in his anchor element. But even then you might notice that the hrule and trailing bullet are part of the weblink, and if you're thinking hinky, that would be just a bit of a giveaway.

SpaceLifeFormApril 9, 2020 6:06 PM

@ A dubious person

Yes, it is a bug to allow bad html.

A Q+D 'fix' would be to always add an empty anchor at the end of each post automagically.

<a></a>

The browser would do nothing with it.

If there is no validation, there could be other issues.

Clive RobinsonApril 9, 2020 7:41 PM

@

"John Smith"'s presumed mistake implicitly attributes a web presence to Clive Robinson that I'm sure Clive neither deserves nor appreciates.

I've not looked where it goes, but you are right, it's not anything to do with me thus it hurts my reputation either way.

Because even if what the link went to was fantastic art, creative genius etc I would be seen as stealing credit for anothers work.

As members of my family and some of my friends have had the credit for their work and originality of thought and research stolen by others and their careers effectively penalized, I'm some what sensitive to what such behaviour can do to an individual.

myliitApril 10, 2020 6:17 AM

@SpaceLifeForm

“Zoom in Court”

From your PopeHat threadReader link above:

“I'm seated at my makeshift desk in my suit waiting for first Zoom court appearance to start.
Wife: [peeks under desk]
Me: YES I AM WEARING PANTS
Wife: Why?
Me: WHAT IF THE JUDGE ASKS
Wife: Lie?
Me: I AM AN OFFICER OF THE COURT [1]
Wife: NOT ABOUT PANTS
Elaina, 13: WHY ARE WE YELLING”

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Officer_of_the_court

“In common law jurisdictions, the generic term officer of the court is applied to all those who, in some degree in the function of their professional or similar qualifications, have a part in the legal system. Officers of the court should not be confused with court officers, the law enforcement personnel who work in courts.

Officers of the court have legal and ethical obligations. They are tasked to participate to the best of their ability in the functioning of the judicial system as a whole, in order to forge justice out of the application of the law and the simultaneous pursuit of the legitimate interests of all parties and the general good of society. [2]

Officers of the court can be divided into the following functional groups. In most case various synonyms and parallels exist as well as a variety of operational variations, depending on the jurisdiction and the changes in relevant legislation:”

[2] Of course, our, perhaps, narcissistic president, might think that #o sad.

OT

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUg5p3BncuQ When I get back to Phoenix
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8P_xTBpAcY Witchita Lineman

A dubious personApril 11, 2020 4:43 PM

@ SpaceLifeForm

Just closing tags for all the allowed HTML elements that need them would probably be enough - browsers tend to tolerate sloppy HTML coding, so a dangling </a> or </em> shouldn't cause any visible browser misbehavior. But if I were implementing such a fix I'd test it pretty thoroughly in recent builds of FF/Chrome/Edge/Safari to make sure. (I'd even test it in IE6, just to be perverse. But not IE5 - I have some standards!)


@ Clive

I didn't follow the link either; the domain name suggests it's just a quasi-legal fad supplement web store, so I decided there was nothing interesting to be learned.

Clive RobinsonApril 11, 2020 5:07 PM

@ A dubious person,

Your handle is wearing my finger out on this smart phone so how about A_Dub ;-)

I didn't follow the link either; the domain name suggests it's just a quasi-legal fad supplement web store, so I decided there was nothing interesting to be learned.

Probably a wise move. I've not seen any "known to be bad" links come up on this blog, but it's going to happen one day, so if I want to know more I generally drop the URL or a shortened version into a search engine to see what comes up.

But as you say "quasi-legal" or a nutbar health product is most likely from the link name and to be honest aside from the four basic "bloke food groups" (of "Beer, bacon, bread and fried stuff" ;-) what supplements do you realy need 0:)

fish headsApril 11, 2020 9:21 PM

Everyone please familiarize yourself with ID2020.

Do NOT accept the mark, AT ANY COST. Whether by tattoo, chip, or other, do not let them chip you.

People will be desperate to get out of the house and without restrictions, what better way to execute such a plot than with this virus?

Do not trust Bill Gates or ID2020.

Gerard van VoorenApril 12, 2020 12:33 AM

What worries me is simple the fact that they (the manufacturers) can't program securely, and that is coming from firms such as MS, Apple and Google, with high salaries, and that from decades of "technology push".

The answer is easy guys, the only thing that you have to require is laws. Laws that protect the people, not the firms.

JonKnowsNothingApril 12, 2020 10:03 AM

@Gerard van Vooren

re:

The answer is easy guys, the only thing that you have to require is laws. Laws that protect the people, not the firms.

We have lots of laws. Most countries have lots of laws too. In fact, I think there are A LOT of laws floating about.

Laws do not make programs work. Laws do not make programs secure, they may mandate that programs work a certain way but that's all.

There are laws to prevent X,Y,Z happening and an equal or greater number of secret-laws or secret-un-laws to ensure that X,Y,Z is not happening.

Looking at the preponderance of Laws that already exist, one or a dozen more or even a lot more, won't make programs more secure.

Getting security in a program, is important. Getting a program to function correct is more important. There are fewer opportunities for mischief if the program isn't crud to start with (zoom that).

Teaching people how to do program without crud-ware and also to include security 1 requires some cooperation from companies and the people who are doing the work.

Corporations don't worry that much about laws. They can buy the ones they want.

The rest of us are stuck with the residue of Quick and Dirty and Fix-It-In-The-Next-Release.


1 Program Security - TBD of course to the type of program. The TBD part is where things get sticky.

La AbejaApril 12, 2020 11:31 AM

@JonKnowsNothing, @Gerard van Vooren

The answer is easy guys, the only thing that you have to require is laws. Laws that protect the people, not the firms.
We have lots of laws. Most countries have lots of laws too. In fact, I think there are A LOT of laws floating about.

Other people aren't behaving the way we would like them to, so we should implement a system for punishing them out of the behaviors that we dislike and punishing them into behaviors that are more to our expectations.

We find that heavy fines and long prison sentences are very helpful to punish people out of doing or saying things that we dislike, and to punish them more into responsibility and obedience to our wishes and commands.

And the more laws the better, because every law passed by a legislative body is passed for its punishment by fines and imprisonment to be imposed legally, by law, lawfully, and subject to the jurisdiction of the law.

myliitApril 13, 2020 6:20 AM

Collateral damage [1] from our president’s propagandistic war (is he a deadly joke or what?) on Coronavirus:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0EiV423j0M 3:56 or

https://www.npr.org/2020/04/10/830101087/watch-and-weep-john-prine-and-bonnie-raitt-perform-angel-from-montgomery and Prine w/When I get to Heaven [3]

"When I Get To Heaven [2]

When I get to heaven, I'm gonna shake God's hand
Thank him for more blessings than one man can stand
Then I'm gonna get a guitar and start a rock-n-roll band
Check into a swell hotel, ain't the afterlife grand?

And then I'm gonna get a cocktail: vodka and ginger ale
Yeah, I'm gonna smoke a cigarette that's nine miles long
I'm gonna kiss that pretty girl on the tilt-a-whirl
'Cause this old man is goin' to town

Then as God as my witness, I'm gettin' back into show business
I'm gonna open up a nightclub called ...

Yeah when I get to heaven, I'm gonna take that wristwatch off my arm
What are you gonna do with time after you've bought the farm?
And then I'm gonna go find my mom and dad, and good old brother Doug
Well I bet him and cousin Jackie are still cuttin' up a rug
I wanna see all my mama's sisters, 'cause that's where all the love starts
I miss 'em all like crazy, bless their little hearts ...
And then I'm gonna get a cocktail: vodka and ginger ale
Yeah, I'm gonna smoke a cigarette that's nine miles long
I'm gonna kiss that pretty girl on the tilt-a-whirl
'Cause this old man is goin' to town “


[1] John Prine died recently. He tested positive for covid-19. Is our president a piece of crap or what? Trump is Shit.

[2] https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/johnprine/whenigettoheaven.html

[3] 4:17 : 3:38

[4] lyrics when i get to heaven

[5] lyrics angel from montgomery, written by a young john prine

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rkr6TVnGtAM Murder Most Foul, w/lyrics, Dylan, Bob 2020, 16:59

Geoffrey NicolettiApril 15, 2020 7:30 PM

I am thinking of the shifting pattern on bandwidth---the implications of that.
Also infrastructure attacks are, in general, better handled within the context of the worker's employer campus rather than in the extension to one's home. How many APTs can your home system handle? (The Chinese, having difficulty with the Defense Department years ago, went after the Defense contractors.)And am I coming after you because of content you have? Or because of links you have?

FrankApril 15, 2020 9:12 PM

Because of the virus situation, most people are now forced to work from home, and home access to work computer is less secure than you physically sit in your office and the PCs in your office are maintained by your sys. admin with all the security features.

So this makes cybersecurity even more important than before. Still password is a weak link, hackers for sure will explore this weak link. But there is now a solution to this weak link, it can make passwords short and easy to remember, yet hard to hack, there are some demo apps, hope more people are aware of this innovative technology and take advantage of it to secure the cyber space.

https://gatecybertech.com/gate.html

GATE Android Demo

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