I Have a New Book: We Have Root

I just published my third collection of essays: We Have Root. This book covers essays from 2013 to 2017. (The first two are Schneier on Security and Carry On.)

There is nothing in this book is that is not available for free on my website; but if you'd like these essays in an easy-to-carry paperback book format, you can order a signed copy here. External vendor links, including for ebook versions, here.

Posted on October 11, 2019 at 2:34 PM • 4 Comments

Comments

Jim KOctober 11, 2019 7:19 PM

Might need to revisit that title in Australia, though going by the titles I see at the airport these days, perhaps not.

Clive RobinsonOctober 12, 2019 6:06 AM

@ David,

Ah, some revenge finally for all the ridiculous US manipulations of good language Australians have been forced to endure for, well, forever

Well... What about English english?

I have relatives on my side of the family who emigrated. They were not "Five pound Poms" but later.

The problem word caused the lady of the household some embarrassment. Being more of a horticulturalist than a gardener, she decided to grow food plants rather than flowers, thus had taken the usual weapons of mass destruction horticulturalists use to their large urban lot.

So far so good. Now one thing horticulturalists do that gardeners don't is "propagate cuttings". That is from a mature plant you cut off a young leaf node and turn it into a viable plant. Some plants you only need to put in water and a little shaded light and you can see the transformation in just a few days. Others you need to add chemicals to the water.

Any way at some point you need to transfer the cuttings to something aproximating soil, this can be very hit or miss unless you use some chemicals to assist the plant.

There are several mixes of such chemicals and they have trade names etc. Anyway the lady of the house being a horticulturalist needed more than a little of these chemicals. So after looking up trade suppliers off she went to get the chemicals.

After looking around she could not see what she was looking for and she went upto the counter which had a croud of serious looking Aussie types. Horticulture being a mans hobby/trade those "of a rum drinking male redneck variety"[1] you refered to abounded. Thus feeling both new and slightly intimidated she spoke both clearly and perhaps to loudly when asking if they had "Any 10lb bags of Johnson's rooting powder?",

Apparently they let her down good naturedly but she said she did still feel her ears go red just thinking about it several years later.

Apparently there is a problem for young australians coming to the UK to study and such like, if they ask for sticky tape by trade name apparently Australian's don't call it "Sellotape",

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sellotape

Apparently untill fairly recently it was a 3M brand under their "DUrability, Reliability, and EXcellence" range,

https://www.wordnik.com/words/Durex

Perhaps I should note that 3M is a US Corporation, so your original claim of "ridiculous US manipulations of good language" still stands ;-)

[1] Though she said "beer" not "rum" in her description.

rachaellittlerNovember 11, 2019 7:30 AM

I've never read such literature, to be honest. I'm a student, so there is no time for that. I hope that my friend could write my essay for me like https://ca.edubirdie.com/write-my-essay-for-me service because I'm really tired. There will be holidays soon and I hope to do all my tasks. And what could I read more about that?

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Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.