Girl Scouts to Offer Merit Badges in Cybersecurity

The Girl Scouts are going to be offering 18 merit badges in cybersecurity, to scouts as young as five years old.

Posted on June 28, 2017 at 12:56 PM • 9 Comments

Comments

Ross SniderJune 28, 2017 1:19 PM

I sincerely look forward to the day I can look at resumes for pentesting/sysadministration/operations and see Girl Scout experience. Somehow it already seems more credible than "random Cisco certification here".

Fat BastardJune 28, 2017 1:49 PM

FYI: Here are the names of the badges the girls can earn

1. The Cookie Monster Badge: earned for successfully hacking into 20 strangers computers running Firefox and turning cookies off surreptitiously.
2. The Thin Mint Badge: earned for enticing twenty people into a honeypot,
3. The Snitcherdoodle Badge: earned for infiltrating any Tor hidden service using a tool from Metasploit
4. The More S'more Badge: earned for infiltrating a Tor hidden service hosting child pornography and deleting all content. (Must have earned The Snitcherdoodle Badge first).
5. The DOS-si-dos Badge: Fending off any Denial Of Service attack of 2000 mb/s or greater
6. The Savanna Smile Badge: Getting your security-related tweet re-tweeted by @TheGrugq
7. The Burnt Brownie Badge: Using any SCADA exploit to compromise a public electrical system
8. The Junior Junior Badge: Finding your first 0-day in any kids toy
9. The Cadette Cabal Badge: Creating a new fake identity from multiple real identities and opening a bank account with it. (must be earned as a group).
10. The Senior Thesis Badge: Sending all e-mail encrypted with PGP for six months
11. The Cute Ambassador: Using steganography to successfully communicate with a Girl Scout in a foreign country.
12. The Plucked Daisy Badge: Meeting Julian Assange in person
13. The Green Machine Badge: Uncovering the real identity of Satoshi Nakamoto
14. The Boys Have Cooties Badge: Infecting 100 computers with ransomware
15. The CIA Badge: Communicating with a boyfriend via the drafts folder of Google email
16. The NSA Badge: Forgetting to delete the draft of the email (must have earned The CIA Badge first)
17. The Bald Eagle: Using Amazon's Alexia to successfully spy on your parents
18. The Apple: Jailbreaking an iPhone


jdgaltJune 28, 2017 2:02 PM

Even five-year-olds need to learn things such as not answering questions from phishing callers, even if they claim to be a relative, landlord, daddy's boss, police, etc., and not accepting and using disks/thumbdrives/other media from unknown sources.

Chris ZweberJune 28, 2017 4:33 PM

@Fat Bastard

19. The Surprise President: Hack the student body election results to make the class stoner student council president
20. The Instaqueen: Compromise the Instagram accounts of the starting quarterback and like all of your own photos

TatütataJune 29, 2017 1:31 PM

They should be able to recycle and extend old and tested skills, such as first aid:

- Tie network cables into knots to stop data leakage;
- Start fires with Samsung smartphones (and put them out after);
- Make cookies out of AOL CDs;
- Carve USB sticks into whistles.

CallMeLateForSupperJuly 1, 2017 12:20 PM

What, exactly, is wrong with this program that only one of the first six posts in this thread expresses support, or even positive words, for it? It deserves better, in my opinion.

If it were Boy Scouts of America announcing exactly the same program, for boys, I suspect expressed sentiments would be along the lines of "Great idea" or "It's about time".

(What the heck is "Amazon's Alexia"?)

Tobey CookJuly 1, 2017 1:28 PM

I think this is a fantastic idea. The more young minds we can get involved with cybersecurity the better. They're the next generation of ethical hackers and will be sorely needed if things keep escalating the way they have been.

NinjaGirlJuly 3, 2017 10:20 PM

This is retarded. I don't just make cookies... I code them; and I'm a CQB expert in MP5K... hoes.

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