Liars and Outliers News

The book is selling well. (Signed copies are still available on the website.) All the online stores have it, and most bookstores as well. It is available in Europe and elsewhere outside the U.S. And for those who wanted a DRM-free electronic copy, it's available on the OReilly.com bookstore for $11.99.

I have collected four new reviews. And a bunch of reviews on Amazon.

There's an interview with me about the book on TheBrowser.com.

Gizmodo has published an except from Chapter 17. I (and others) have published Chapter 1. And all the figures, mostly for people reading the ebook.

Posted on February 24, 2012 at 3:18 PM • 12 Comments

Comments

Doug DFebruary 24, 2012 4:34 PM

Thanks much for the O'Reilly pointer. I'd been agonizing over whether to get the iBooks version, the B&N (Nook) version, or nothing.

My preferred reader software is iBooks, but DRMed content for iBooks "can't" be read anywhere else. We also have a few Nooks in our house, but I worry about content that's tied to them in case B&N kills the product line and the DRM service (eg. if Amazon "wins"). Every choice I saw had a downside that made me uncomfortable.

I hadn't thought to check O'Reilly (and had already ruled out Amazon -- I want EPUB files). This pointer has already resulted in at least one sale (and I'm passing it along to interested parties, so it may become multiple pretty quickly).

LeoNFebruary 25, 2012 5:16 AM

Another thanks for the O'Reilly link, purchase made! Readers want DRM-free purchases and it's great to have Publishers and Authors that provide that.

Looking forward to this one..

BrianDFebruary 25, 2012 4:18 PM

My wife works with parents, helping them to become better parents. I wasn't too far into the book before I started reading it from the perspective of how it applies to parenting.

Depending on their age, a child may or may not have the understanding of how a given pressure should impact their decision making. Couple that with children's tendency to overestimate value and underestimate cost, and defections are easily explained.

Read from this perspective, it helps explain why things that work in parenting do, and why some parenting mistakes end with the results they do.

DeweyFebruary 25, 2012 9:03 PM

Wish I'd know about the DRMless version before I bout the kindle ebook. I'd rather support anti-DRM.

Nick PFebruary 26, 2012 1:43 AM

Non-DRM is good. That the book is already down to $12 is good for us. Although maybe not as much for you. ;)

MatthiasFebruary 26, 2012 4:51 AM

Thanks for offering the book through O'Reilly. I had never shopped there before and was relieved to find that unlike Amazon and Barnes&Noble who refuse to sell ebooks to non-Americans, O'Reilly doesn't have this restriction. And they don't have this crazy pricing like Amazon where the hardcover costs less than the ebook as if printing bits was more expensive.

Clive RobinsonFebruary 26, 2012 7:10 AM

@ Matthias,

...unlike Amazon and Barnes&Noble who refuse to sell ebooks to non-Americans O'Reilly doesn't have this restriction

I don't know about the Barnes&Noble selling model, but the Amazon e-book model may well be illegal in Europe from what I understand (it's to do with what is technicaly an illegal cross subsiding of the business).

Also... some books in the USA due to other US legislation can not be sold in Europe which doesn't apply to the O'Reilly books as none of them are anywhere near old enough.

Oh and then there is still the hang over from the "export on munitions" legislation that apparently does not apply to information in printed books but does to electronic books. Put simply a book with a printed software section is ok but the same software in electronic form is not. This has found it's way into ordinary copyright issues as has been seen in one or two "cease and desist" claims where publishers are trying to ring fence basic knowledge and mathmatics as being proprietary property.

A recentish example was over the "time" database where a publisher of astrology books claimed that information "proprietory to them" had been put into the database. The claim was highly dubious at best even in the US (and not enforcable else where), but when an individual is faced off by a corporation with on staff legal personal highly knowledgable in the area who get paid regardless, and the individual having to pay very high rates for their own legal representatives, capitulation is almost certainly guaranteed. Which is what these shyster companies relie upon.

Even where the individual knows theyy are legaly right, they probably will decide not to fight the company because they will invariably just fire off multiple injunctions with delaying tactics to keep the individual making the information available...

Realisticaly at the end of the day it has nothing to do with what is and is not right but the Mickey Mouse Corp and their fiends buying off US legislators to protect their closed market.

The likes of Amazon have to make a choice support little guys rights and lose the rights to market big earnings media or... I guess the old "money talks..." adage applies.

There are only two ways to change this effect significantly the corperate bottom line, or put the corperate officers (executive or not) in fear one way or another. Their greatest fear of course being ridicule and humiliation in the shareholders eyes, shortly followed by loss of status, oddly imprisonment following trial does not even make it onto their radar which is a major tell...

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