Entries Tagged "Schneier news"

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Secure Flight Privacy/IT Working Group

I am participating in a working group to help evaluate the effectiveness and privacy implications of the TSA’s Secure Flight program. We’ve had one meeting so far, and it looks like it will be an interesting exercise.

For those who have not been following along, Secure Flight is the follow-on to CAPPS-I. (CAPPS stands for Computer Assisted Passenger Pre-Screening.) CAPPS-I has been in place since 1997, and is a simple system to match airplane passengers to a terrorist watch list. A follow-on system, CAPPS-II, was proposed last year. That complicated system would have given every traveler a risk score based on information in government and commercial databases. There was a huge public outcry over the invasiveness of the system, and it was cancelled over the summer. Secure Flight is the new follow-on system to CAPPS-I.

Many of us believe that Secure Flight is just CAPPS-II with a new name. I hope to learn whether or not that is true.

I hope to learn a lot of things about Secure Flight and airline passenger profiling in general, but I probably won’t be able to write about it. In order to be a member of this working group, I was required to apply for a U.S. government SECRET security clearance and sign an NDA, promising that I would not disclose something called “Sensitive Security Information.”

SSI is one of three new categories of secret information, all of I think have no reason to exist. There is already a classification scheme — CONFIDENTIAL, SECRET, TOP SECRET, etc. — and information should either fit into that scheme or be public. A new scheme is just confusing. The NDA we were supposed to sign was very general, and included such provisions as allowing the government to conduct warrantless searches of our residences. (Two federal unions have threatened to sue the government over several provisions in that NDA, which applies to many DHS employees. And just recently, the DHS backed down.)

After push-back by myself and several others, we were given a much less onerous NDA to sign.

I am not happy about the secrecy surrounding the working group. NDAs and classified briefings raise serious ethical issues for government oversight committees. My suspicion is that I will be wowed with secret, unverifiable assertions that I will either have to accept or (more likely) question, but not be able to discuss with others. In general, secret deliberations favor the interests of those who impose the rules. They really run against the spirit of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA).

Moreover, I’m not sure why this working group is not in violation of FACA. FACA is a 1972 law intended to govern how the Executive branch uses groups of advisors outside the federal government. Among other rules, it requires that advisory committees announce their meetings, hold them in public, and take minutes that are available to the public. The DHS was given a specific exemption from FACA when it was established: the Secretary of Homeland Security has the authority to exempt any advisory committee from FACA; the only requirement is that the Secretary publish notice of the committee in the Federal Register. I looked, and have not seen any such announcement.

Because of the NDA and the failure to follow FACA, I will not be able to fully exercise my First Amendment rights. That means that the government can stop me from saying things that may be important for the public to know. For example, if I learn that the old CAPPS program failed to identify actual terrorists, or that a lot of people who were not terrorists were wrongfully pulled off planes and the government has tried to keep this quiet — I’m just making these up — I can’t tell you. The government could prosecute me under the NDA because they might claim these facts are SSI and the public would never know this information, because there would be no open meeting obligations as there are for FACA committees.

In other words, the secrecy of this committee could have a real impact on the public understanding of whether or not air passenger screening really works.

In any case, I hope I can help make Secure Flight an effective security tool. I hope I can help minimize the privacy invasions on the program if it continues, and help kill it if it is ineffective. I’m not optimistic, but I’m hopeful.

I’m not hopeful that you will ever learn the results of this working group. We’re preparing our report for the Aviation Security Advisory Committee, and I very much doubt that they will release the report to the public.

Original NDA

Story about unions objecting to the NDA

And a recent development that may or may not affect this group

Posted on January 13, 2005 at 9:08 AMView Comments

Bad Quote

In a story on a computer glitch that forced Comair to cancel 1,100 flighs on Christmas Day, I was quoted in an AP story as saying:

“If this kind of thing could happen by accident, what would happen if the bad guys did this on purpose?” he said.

I’m sure I said that, but I wish the reporter hadn’t used it. It’s just the sort of fear-mongering that I object to when others do it.

Posted on December 28, 2004 at 8:58 AMView Comments

Schneier: Microsoft still has work to do

Bruce Schneier is founder and chief technology officer of Mountain View, Calif.-based MSSP Counterpane Internet Security Inc. and author of Applied Cryptography, Secrets and Lies, and Beyond Fear. He also publishes Crypto-Gram, a free monthly newsletter, and writes op-ed pieces for various publications. Schneier spoke to SearchSecurity.com about the latest threats, Microsoft’s ongoing security struggles and other topics in a two-part interview that took place by e-mail and phone last month. In this installment, he talks about the “hype” of SP2 and explains why it’s “foolish” to use Internet Explorer.

What’s the biggest threat to information security at the moment?

Schneier: Crime. Criminals have discovered IT in a big way. We’re seeing a huge increase in identity theft and associated financial theft. We’re seeing a rise in credit card fraud. We’re seeing a rise in blackmail. Years ago, the people breaking into computers were mostly kids participating in the information-age equivalent of spray painting. Today there’s a profit motive, as those same hacked computers become launching pads for spam, phishing attacks and Trojans that steal passwords. Right now we’re seeing a crime wave against Internet consumers that has the potential to radically change the way people use their computers. When enough average users complain about having money stolen, the government is going to step in and do something. The results are unlikely to be pretty.

Which threats are overly hyped?

Schneier: Cyberterrorism. It’s not much of a threat. These attacks are very difficult to execute. The software systems controlling our nation’s infrastructure are filled with vulnerabilities, but they’re generally not the kinds of vulnerabilities that cause catastrophic disruptions. The systems are designed to limit the damage that occurs from errors and accidents. They have manual overrides. These systems have been proven to work; they’ve experienced disruptions caused by accident and natural disaster. We’ve been through blackouts, telephone switch failures and disruptions of air traffic control computers. The results might be annoying, and engineers might spend days or weeks scrambling, but it doesn’t spread terror. The effect on the general population has been minimal.

Microsoft has made much of the added security muscle in SP2. Has it measured up to the hype?

Schneier: SP2 is much more hype than substance. It’s got some cool things, but I was unimpressed overall. It’s a pity, though. They had an opportunity to do more, and I think they could have done more. But even so, this stuff is hard. I think the fact that SP2 was largely superficial speaks to how the poor security choices Microsoft made years ago are deeply embedded inside the operating system.

Is Microsoft taking security more seriously?

Schneier: Microsoft is certainly taking it more seriously than three years ago, when they ignored it completely. But they’re still not taking security seriously enough for me. They’ve made some superficial changes in the way they approach security, but they still treat it more like a PR problem than a technical problem. To me, the problem is economic. Microsoft — or any other software company — is not a charity, and we should not expect them to do something that hurts their bottom line. As long as we all are willing to buy insecure software, software companies don’t have much incentive to make their products secure. For years I have been advocating software liability as a way of changing that balance. If software companies could get sued for defective products, just as automobile manufacturers are, then they would spend much more money making their products secure.

After the Download.ject attack in June, voices advocating alternatives to Internet Explorer grew louder. Which browser do you use?

Schneier: I think it’s foolish to use Internet Explorer. It’s filled with security holes, and it’s too hard to configure it to have decent security. Basically, it seems to be written in the best interests of Microsoft and not in the best interests of the customer. I have used the Opera browser for years, and I am very happy with it. It’s much better designed, and I never have to worry about Explorer-based attacks.

By Bill Brenner, News Writer
4 Oct 2004 | SearchSecurity.com

Posted on October 8, 2004 at 4:45 PMView Comments

New Blog, and Changes to Crypto-Gram

I’m in the process of making several changes to Crypto-Gram, all designed to give readers more reading options.

Blog: Crypto-Gram is now available in blog form. Called “Schneier on Security,” the blog will have the same content as Crypto-Gram but it will be posted continually rather than only on the 15th of the month. Initially, blog comments will be turned off. I’ll enable them as soon as my anti-blog-spam software is working.

RSS: The Crypto-Gram RSS feed has been working for about six months now. Current RSS subscribers will receive the blog version of Crypto-Gram instead of the once-a-month version.

E-Mail: Crypto-Gram will still be available as a once-a-month e-mail, and back issues of Crypto-Gram will still be available on the Web.

Many of these changes are based on a 400-person reader survey I conducted (making it more accurate than most political polls). Thank you to those who completed the survey, and to everyone for your continued support.

Posted on October 1, 2004 at 9:34 PMView Comments

New Blog, and Changes to Crypto-Gram

I’m in the process of making several changes to Crypto-Gram, all designed to give readers more reading options.

Blog: Crypto-Gram is now available in blog form. Called “Schneier on Security,” the blog will have the same content as Crypto-Gram but it will be posted continually rather than only on the 15th of the month. Initially, blog comments will be turned off. I’ll enable them as soon as my anti-blog-spam software is working.

RSS: The Crypto-Gram RSS feed has been working for about six months now. Current RSS subscribers will receive the blog version of Crypto-Gram instead of the once-a-month version.

E-Mail: Crypto-Gram will still be available as a once-a-month e-mail, and back issues of Crypto-Gram will still be available on the Web.

Many of these changes are based on a 400-person reader survey I conducted (making it more accurate than most political polls). Thank you to those who completed the survey, and to everyone for your continued support.

Posted on October 1, 2004 at 9:34 PMView Comments

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Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.