Entries Tagged "hacking"

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FBI Had the REvil Decryption Key

The Washington Post reports that the FBI had a decryption key for the REvil ransomware, but didn’t pass it along to victims because it would have disrupted an ongoing operation.

The key was obtained through access to the servers of the Russia-based criminal gang behind the July attack. Deploying it immediately could have helped the victims, including schools and hospitals, avoid what analysts estimate was millions of dollars in recovery costs.

But the FBI held on to the key, with the agreement of other agencies, in part because it was planning to carry out an operation to disrupt the hackers, a group known as REvil, and the bureau did not want to tip them off. Also, a government assessment found the harm was not as severe as initially feared.

Fighting ransomware is filled with security trade-offs. This is one I had not previously considered.

Another news story.

Posted on September 22, 2021 at 9:30 AMView Comments

T-Mobile Data Breach

It’s a big one:

As first reported by Motherboard on Sunday, someone on the dark web claims to have obtained the data of 100 million from T-Mobile’s servers and is selling a portion of it on an underground forum for 6 bitcoin, about $280,000. The trove includes not only names, phone numbers, and physical addresses but also more sensitive data like social security numbers, driver’s license information, and IMEI numbers, unique identifiers tied to each mobile device. Motherboard confirmed that samples of the data “contained accurate information on T-Mobile customers.”

Posted on August 19, 2021 at 6:17 AMView Comments

Defeating Microsoft’s Trusted Platform Module

This is a really interesting story explaining how to defeat Microsoft’s TPM in 30 minutes—without having to solder anything to the motherboard.

Researchers at the security consultancy Dolos Group, hired to test the security of one client’s network, received a new Lenovo computer preconfigured to use the standard security stack for the organization. They received no test credentials, configuration details, or other information about the machine.

They were not only able to get into the BitLocker-encrypted computer, but then use the computer to get into the corporate network.

It’s the “evil maid attack.” It requires physical access to your computer, but you leave it in your hotel room all the time when you go out to dinner.

Original blog post.

Posted on August 9, 2021 at 6:19 AMView Comments

The European Space Agency Launches Hackable Satellite

Of course this is hackable:

A sophisticated telecommunications satellite that can be completely repurposed while in space has launched.

[…]

Because the satellite can be reprogrammed in orbit, it can respond to changing demands during its lifetime.

[…]

The satellite can detect and characterise any rogue emissions, enabling it to respond dynamically to accidental interference or intentional jamming.

We can assume strong encryption, and good key management. Still, seems like a juicy target for other governments.

Posted on August 2, 2021 at 6:46 AMView Comments

Hiding Malware in ML Models

Interesting research: “EvilModel: Hiding Malware Inside of Neural Network Models.”

Abstract: Delivering malware covertly and detection-evadingly is critical to advanced malware campaigns. In this paper, we present a method that delivers malware covertly and detection-evadingly through neural network models. Neural network models are poorly explainable and have a good generalization ability. By embedding malware into the neurons, malware can be delivered covertly with minor or even no impact on the performance of neural networks. Meanwhile, since the structure of the neural network models remains unchanged, they can pass the security scan of antivirus engines. Experiments show that 36.9MB of malware can be embedded into a 178MB-AlexNet model within 1% accuracy loss, and no suspicious are raised by antivirus engines in VirusTotal, which verifies the feasibility of this method. With the widespread application of artificial intelligence, utilizing neural networks becomes a forwarding trend of malware. We hope this work could provide a referenceable scenario for the defense on neural network-assisted attacks.

News article.

Posted on July 27, 2021 at 6:25 AMView Comments

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.