Entries Tagged "books"

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More Data and Goliath News

Right now, the book is #6 on the New York Times best-seller list in hardcover nonfiction, and #13 in combined print and e-book nonfiction. This is the March 22 list, and covers sales from the first week of March. The March 29 list—covering sales from the second week of March—is not yet on the Internet. On that list, I’m #11 on the hardcover nonfiction list, and not at all on the combined print and e-book nonfiction list.

Marc Rotenberg of EPIC tells me that Vance Packard’s The Naked Society made it to #7 on the list during the week of July 12, 1964, and—by that measure—Data and Goliath is the most popular privacy book of all time. I’m not sure I can claim that honor yet, but it’s a nice thought. And two weeks on the New York Times best-seller list is super fantastic.

For those curious to know what sorts of raw numbers translate into those rankings, this is what I know. Nielsen Bookscan tracks retail sales across the US, and captures about 80% of the book market. It reports that my book sold 4,706 copies during the first week of March, and 2,339 copies in the second week. Taking that 80% figure, that means I sold 6,000 copies the first week and 3,000 the second.

My publisher tells me that Amazon sold 650 hardcovers and 600 e-books during the first week, and 400 hardcovers and 500 e-books during the second week. The hardcover sales ranking was 865, 949, 611, 686, 657, 602, 595 during the first week, and 398, 511, 693, 867, 341, 357, 343 during the second. The book’s rankings during those first few days don’t match sales, because Amazon records a sale for the rankings when a person orders a book, but only counts the sale when it actually ships it. So all of my preorders sold on that first day, even though they were calculated in the rankings during the days and weeks before publication date.

There are few new book reviews. There’s one from the Dealbook blog at the New York Times that treats the book very seriously, but doesn’t agree with my conclusions. (A rebuttal to that review is here.) A review from the Wall Street Journal was even less kind. This review from InfoWorld is much more positive.

All of this, and more, is on the book’s website.

There are several book-related videos online. The first is the talk I gave at the Harvard Bookstore on March 4th. The second and third are interviews of me on Democracy Now. I also did a more general Q&A with Gizmodo.

Note to readers. The book is 80,000 words long, which is a normal length for a book like this. But the book’s size is much larger, because it contains a lot of references. They’re not numbered, but if they were, there would be over 1,000 numbers. I counted all the links, and there are 1,622 individual citations. That’s a lot of text. This means that if you’re reading the book on paper, the narrative ends on page 238, even though the book continues to page 364. If you’re reading it on the Kindle, you’ll finish the book when the Kindle says you’re only 44% of the way through. The difference between pages and percentages is because the references are set in smaller type than the body. I warn you of this now, so you know what to expect. It always annoys me that the Kindle calculates percent done from the end of the file, not the end of the book.

And if you’ve read the book, please post a review on the book’s Amazon page or on Goodreads. Reviews are important on those sites, and I need more of them.

Posted on March 19, 2015 at 2:35 PMView Comments

Data and Goliath Makes New York Times Best-Seller List

The March 22 best-seller list from the New York Times will list me as #6 in the hardcover nonfiction category, and #13 in the combined paper/e-book category. This is amazing, really. The book just barely crossed #400 on Amazon this week, but it seems that other booksellers did more.

There are new reviews from the LA Times, Lawfare, EFF, and Slashdot.

The Internet Society recorded a short video of me talking about my book. I’ve given longer talks, and videos should be up soon. “Science Friday” interviewed me about my book.

Amazon has it back in stock. And, as always, more information on the book’s website.

Posted on March 12, 2015 at 2:05 PMView Comments

New Book: Data and Goliath

After a year of talking about it, my new book is finally published.

This is the copy from the inside front flap:

You are under surveillance right now.

Your cell phone provider tracks your location and knows who’s with you. Your online and in-store purchasing patterns are recorded, and reveal if you’re unemployed, sick, or pregnant. Your e-mails and texts expose your intimate and casual friends. Google knows what you’re thinking because it saves your private searches. Facebook can determine your sexual orientation without you ever mentioning it.

The powers that surveil us do more than simply store this information. Corporations use surveillance to manipulate not only the news articles and advertisements we each see, but also the prices we’re offered. Governments use surveillance to discriminate, censor, chill free speech, and put people in danger worldwide. And both sides share this information with each other or, even worse, lose it to cybercriminals in huge data breaches.

Much of this is voluntary: we cooperate with corporate surveillance because it promises us convenience, and we submit to government surveillance because it promises us protection. The result is a mass surveillance society of our own making. But have we given up more than we’ve gained? In Data and Goliath, security expert Bruce Schneier offers another path, one that values both security and privacy. He shows us exactly what we can do to reform our government surveillance programs and shake up surveillance-based business models, while also providing tips for you to protect your privacy every day. You’ll never look at your phone, your computer, your credit cards, or even your car in the same way again.

And there’s a great quote on the cover:

“The public conversation about surveillance in the digital age would be a good deal more intelligent if we all read Bruce Schneier first.”—Malcolm Gladwell, author of David and Goliath

This is the table of contents:

Part 1: The World We’re Creating

Chapter 1: Data as a By-Product of Computing
Chapter 2: Data as Surveillance
Chapter 3: Analyzing our Data
Chapter 4: The Business of Surveillance
Chapter 5: Government Surveillance and Control
Chapter 6: Consolidation of Institutional Surveillance

Part 2: What’s at Stake

Chapter 7: Political Liberty and Justice
Chapter 8: Commercial Fairness and Equality
Chapter 9: Business Competitiveness
Chapter 10: Privacy
Chapter 11: Security

Part 3: What to Do About It

Chapter 12: Principles
Chapter 13: Solutions for Government
Chapter 14: Solutions for Corporations
Chapter 15: Solutions for the Rest of Us
Chapter 16: Social Norms and the Big Data Trade-off

I’ve gotten some great responses from people who read the bound galley, and hope for some good reviews in mainstream publications. So far, there’s one review.

You can buy the book at Amazon, Amazon UK, Barnes & Noble, Powell’s, Book Depository, or IndieBound—which routes your purchase through a local independent bookseller. E-books are available on Amazon, B&N, Apple’s iBooks store, and Google Play.

And if you can, please write a review for Amazon, Goodreads, or anywhere else.

Posted on February 15, 2015 at 6:41 AMView Comments

Adam Shostack's Threat Modeling

Probably the best IT security book of the year is Adam Shostack’s Threat Modeling (Amazon page).

The book is an honorable mention finalist for “The Best Books” of the past 12 months. This is the first time a security book has been on the list since my Applied Cryptography (first edition) won in 1994 and my Secrets and Lies won in 2001.

Anyway, Shostack’s book is really good, and I strongly recommend it. He blogs about the topic here.

Posted on November 3, 2014 at 7:40 AMView Comments

Data and Goliath Is Finished

Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World is finished. I submitted it to my publisher, Norton, this morning. In a few weeks, I’ll get the copyedited manuscript back, and a few weeks after that, it’ll go into production. Stacks of printed books will come out the other end in February, and the book will be published on March 9. There’s already an Amazon page, but it’s still pretty preliminary. And I expect the price to go down.

Books are both a meandering and clarifying process for me, and I figure out what I’m writing about as I write about it. Data and Goliath started out being about security and power in cyberspace, and ended up being about digital surveillance and what to do about it.

This is the table of contents:

Part 1: The World We’re Creating

Chapter 1: Data as a By-Product of Computing
Chapter 2: Data as Surveillance
Chapter 3: Analyzing our Data
Chapter 4: The Business of Surveillance
Chapter 5: Government Surveillance and Control
Chapter 6: Consolidation of Institutional Surveillance

Part 2: What’s at Stake

Chapter 7: Political Liberty and Justice
Chapter 8: Commercial Fairness and Equality
Chapter 9: Business Competitiveness
Chapter 10: Privacy
Chapter 11: Security

Part 3: What to Do About It

Chapter 12: Principles
Chapter 13: Solutions for Government
Chapter 14: Solutions for Corporations
Chapter 15: Solutions for the Rest of Us
Chapter 16: Social Norms and the Big Data Trade-off

Fundamentally, the issues surrounding mass surveillance are tensions between group interest and self-interest, a topic I covered in depth in Liars and Outliers. We’re promised great benefits if we allow all of our data to be collected in one place; at the same time, it can be incredibly personal. I see this tension playing out in many areas: location data, social graphs, medical data, search histories. Figuring out the proper balances between group and self-interests, and ensuring that those balances are maintained, is the fundamental issue of the information age. It’s how we are going to be judged by our descendants fifty years from now.

Anyway, the book is done and at the publisher. I’m happy with it; the manuscript is so tight you can bounce a quarter off of it. This is a complicated topic, and I think I distilled it down into 80,000 words that are both understandable by the lay reader and interesting to the policy wonk or technical geek. It’s also an important topic, and I hope the book becomes a flash point for discussion and debate.

But that’s not for another five months. You might think that’s a long time, but in publishing that’s incredibly fast. I convinced Norton to go with this schedule by stressing that the book becomes less timely every second it’s not published. (An exaggeration, I know, but they bought it.) Now I just hope that nothing major happens between now and then to render the book obsolete.

For now, I want to get back to writing shorter pieces. Writing a book can be all-consuming, and I generally don’t have time for anything else. Look at my essays. Last year, I wrote 59 essays. This year so far: 17. That’s an effect of writing the book. Now that it’s done, expect more essays on news websites and longer posts on this blog. It’ll be good to be thinking about something else for a change.

If anyone works for a publication, and wants to write a review, conduct an interview, publish an excerpt, or otherwise help me get the word out about the book, please e-mail me and I will pass you on to Norton’s publicity department. I think this book has a real chance of breaking out of my normal security market.

Posted on October 7, 2014 at 6:36 AMView Comments

New NSA Snowden Documents

Glenn Greenwald’s new book, No Place to Hide, was published today. There are about 100 pages of NSA documents on the book’s website. I haven’t gone through them yet. At a quick glance, only a few of them have been published before.

Here are two book reviews.

EDITED TO ADD (5/13): It’s suprising how large the FBI’s role in all of this is. On page 81, we see that they’re the point contact for BLARNEY. (BLARNEY is a decades-old AT&T data collection program.) And page 28 shows the ESCU—that’s the FBI’s Electronic Communications Surveillance Unit—is point on all the important domestic collection and interaction with companies. When companies deny that they work with the NSA, it’s likely that they’re working with the FBI and not realizing that it’s the NSA that getting all the data they’re providing.

Posted on May 13, 2014 at 6:38 AMView Comments

Book Title

I previously posted that I am writing a book on security and power. Here are some title suggestions:

  • Permanent Record: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World
  • Hunt and Gather: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World
  • They Already Know: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World
  • We Already Know: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World
  • Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World
  • All About You: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World
  • Tracked: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World
  • Tracking You: The Forces that Capture Your Data and Control Your World
  • Data: The New Currency of Power

My absolute favorite is Data and Goliath, but there’s a problem. Malcolm Gladwell recently published a book with the title of David and Goliath. Normally I wouldn’t care, but I published my Liars and Outliers soon after Gladwell published Outliers. Both similarities are coincidences, but aping him twice feels like a bit much.

Anyway, comments on the above titles—and suggestions for new ones—are appreciated.

The book is still scheduled for February publication. I hope to have a first draft done by the end of June, and a final manuscript by the end of October. If anyone is willing to read and comment on a draft manuscript between those two months, please let me know in e-mail.

Posted on April 16, 2014 at 9:32 AMView Comments

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Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.