Entries Tagged "academic papers"

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NIST Hash Workshop Liveblogging (5)

The afternoon started with three brand new hash functions: FORK-256, DHA-256, and VSH. VSH (Very Smooth Hash) was the interesting one; it’s based on factoring and the discrete logarithm problem, like public-key encryption, and not on bit-twiddling like symmetric encryption. I have no idea if it’s any good, but it’s cool to see something so different.

I think we need different. So many of our hash functions look pretty much the same: MD4, MD5, SHA-0, SHA-1, RIPE-MD, HAVAL, SHA-256, SHA-512. And everything is basically a block cipher in Davies-Meyer mode. I want some completely different designs. I want hash functions based on a stream ciphers. I want more functions based on number theory.

The final session was an open discussion about what to do next. There was much debate about how soon we need a new hash function, how long we should rely on SHA-1 or SHA-256, etc.

Hashing is hard. At the ultra-high-level hand-waving level, it takes a lot more clock cycles per message byte to hash than it does to encrypt. No one has any theory to account for this, but it seems like the lack of any secrets in a hash function makes it a harder problem. This may be an artifact of our lack of knowledge, but I think there’s a grain of fundamental truth buried here.

And hash functions are used everywhere. Hash functions are the workhorse of cryptography; they’re sprinkled all over security protocols. They’re used all the time, in all sorts of weird ways, for all sorts of weird purposes. We cryptographers think of them as good hygiene, kind of like condoms.

So we need a fast answer for immediate applications.

We also need “SHA2,” whatever that will look like. And a design competition is the best way to get a SHA2. (Niels Ferguson pointed out that the AES process was the best cryptographic invention of the past decade.)

Unfortunately, we’re in no position to have an AES-like competition to replace SHA right now. We simply don’t know enough about designing hash functions. What we need is research, random research all over the map. Designs beget analyses beget designs beget analyses…. Right now we need a bunch of mediocre hash function designs. We need a posse of hotshot graduate students breaking them and making names for themselves. We need new tricks and new tools. Hash functions are a hot area of research right now, but anything we can do to stoke that will pay off in the future.

NIST is thinking of hosting another hash workshop right after Crypto next year. That would be a good thing.

I need to get to work on a hash function based on Phelix.

Posted on November 1, 2005 at 3:43 PMView Comments

NIST Hash Workshop Liveblogging (4)

This morning we heard a variety of talks about hash function design. All are esoteric and interesting, and too subtle to summarize here. Hopefully the papers will be online soon; keep checking the conference website.

Lots of interesting ideas, but no real discussion about trade-offs. But it’s the trade-offs that are important. It’s easy to design a good hash function, given no performance constraints. But we need to trade off performance with security. When confronted with a clever idea, like Ron Rivest’s dithering trick, we need to decide if this a good use of time. The question is not whether we should use dithering. The question is whether dithering is the best thing we can do with (I’m making these numbers up) a 20% performance degradation. Is dithering better than adding 20% more rounds? This is the kind of analysis we did when designing Twofish, and it’s the correct analysis here as well.

Bart Preneel pointed out the obvious: if SHA-1 had double the number of rounds, this workshop wouldn’t be happening. If MD5 had double the number of rounds, that hash function would still be secure. Maybe we’ve just been too optimistic about how strong hash functions are.

The other thing we need to be doing is providing answers to developers. It’s not enough to express concern about SHA-256, or wonder how much better the attacks on SHA-1 will become. Developers need to know what hash function to use in their designs. They need an answer today. (SHA-256 is what I tell people.) They’ll need an answer in a year. They’ll need an answer in four years. Maybe the answers will be the same, and maybe they’ll be different. But if we don’t give them answers, they’ll make something up. They won’t wait for us.

And while it’s true that we don’t have any real theory of hash functions, and it’s true that anything we choose will be based partly on faith, we have no choice but to choose.

And finally, I think we need to stimulate research more. Whether it’s a competition or a series of conferences, we need new ideas for design and analysis. Designs beget analyses beget designs beget analyses…. We need a whole bunch of new hash functions to beat up; that’s how we’ll learn to design better ones.

Posted on November 1, 2005 at 11:19 AMView Comments

NIST Hash Workshop Liveblogging (3)

I continue to be impressed by the turnout at this workshop. There are lots of people here whom I haven’t seen in a long time. It’s like a cryptographers’ family reunion.

The afternoon was devoted to cryptanalysis papers. Nothing earth-shattering; a lot of stuff that’s real interesting to me and not very exciting to summarize.

The list of papers is here. NIST promises to put the actual papers online, but they make no promises as to when.

Right now there is a panel discussing how secure SHA-256 is. “How likely is SHA-256 to resist attack for the next ten years?” Some think it will be secure for that long, others think it will fall in five years or so. One person pointed out that if SHA-256 lasts ten years, it will be a world record for a hash function. The consensus is that any new hash function needs to last twenty years, though. It really seems unlikely that any hash function will last that long.

But the real issue is whether there will be any practical attacks. No one knows. Certainly there will be new cryptanalytic techniques developed, especially now that hash functions are a newly hot area for research. But will SHA-256 ever have an attack that’s faster than 280?

Everyone thinks that SHA-1 with 160 rounds is a safer choice than SHA-256 truncated to 160 bits. The devil you know, I guess.

Niels Ferguson, in a comment from the floor, strongly suggested that NIST publish whatever analysis on SHA-256 it has. Since this is most likely by the NSA and classified, it would be a big deal. But I agree that it’s essential for us to fully evaluate the hash function.

Tom Berson, in another comment, suggested that NIST not migrate to a single hash function, but certify multiple alternatives. This has the interesting side effect of forcing the algorithm agility issue. (We had this same debate regarding AES. Negatives are: 1) you’re likely to have a system that is as strong as the weakest choice, and 2) industry will hate it.)

If there’s a moral out of the first day of this workshop, it’s that algorithm agility is an essential feature in any Internet protocol.

Posted on October 31, 2005 at 4:00 PMView Comments

NIST Hash Workshop Liveblogging (2)

In the morning we had a series of interesting papers: “Strengthening Digital Signatures via Randomized Hashing,” by Halevi and Krawczyk; “Herding Hash Functions and the Nostradamus Attack,” by Kelsey and Kohno; and “Collision-Resistant usage of MD5 and SHA-1 via Message Preprocessing,” by Szydlo and Yin. The first and third papers are suggestions for modifying SHA-1 to make it more secure. The second paper discusses some fascinating and cool, but still theoretical, attacks on hash functions.

The last session before lunch was a panel discussion: “SHA-1: Practical Security Implications of Continued Use.” The panel stressed that these are collision attacks and not pre-image attacks, and that many protocols simply don’t care. Collision attacks are important for digital signatures, but less so for other uses of hash functions. On the other hand, this difference is only understood by cryptographers; there are issues if the public believes that SHA-1 is “broken.”

Niels Ferguson pointed out that the big problem is MD5, which is still used everywhere. (Hell, DES is still everywhere.) It takes much longer to upgrade algorithms on the Internet than most people believe; Steve Bellovin says it takes about one year to get the change through the IETF, and another five to seven years to get it depoloyed. And that’s after we all figure out which algorithm they should use.

Georg Illies gave a perspective from Germany, where there is a digital-signature law in effect. In addition to the technology, there are legal considerations that make it harder to switch.

The panel seemed to agree that it’s still safe to use SHA-1 today, but that we need to start migrating to something better. It’s way easier to change algorithms when you’re not in the middle of a panic.

There was more talk about algorithm agility. This problem is larger than SHA. Our Internet protocols simply don’t have a secure methodology for migrating from one cryptographic algorithm to another.

Bottom line: Don’t use SHA-1 for anything new, and start moving away from it as soon as possible. To SHA-256, probably.

And now it’s lunchtime.

Posted on October 31, 2005 at 11:50 AMView Comments

NIST Hash Workshop Liveblogging (1)

I’m in Gaithersburg, MD, at the Cryptographic Hash Workshop hosted by NIST. I’m impressed by the turnout; a lot of the right people are here.

Xiaoyun Wang, the cryptographer who broke SHA-1, spoke about her latest results. They are the same results Adi Shamir presented in her name at Crypto this year: a time complexity of 263.

(I first wrote about Wang’s results here, and discussed their implications here. I wrote about results from Crypto here. Here are her two papers from Crypto: “Efficient Collision Search Attacks on SHA-0” and “Finding Collisions in the Full SHA-1 Collision Search Attacks on SHA1.”)

Steve Bellovin is now talking about the problems associated with upgrading hash functions. He and his coauthor Eric Rescorla looked at S/MIME, TLS, IPSec (and IKE), and DNSSEC. Basically, these protocols can’t change algorithms overnight; it has to happen gradually, over the course of years. So the protocols need some secure way to “switch hit”: to use both the new and old hash functions during the transition period. This requires some sort of signaling, which the protocols don’t do very well. (Bellovin’s and Rescorla’s paper is here.)

Posted on October 31, 2005 at 9:02 AMView Comments

SMS Denial-of-Service Attack

This is a clever piece of research. Turns out you can jam cell phones with SMS messages. Text messages are transmitted on the same channel that is used to set up voice calls, so if you flood the network with one, then the other can’t happen. The researchers believe that sending 165 text messages a second is enough to disrupt all the cell phones in Manhattan.

From the paper:

ABSTRACT: Cellular networks are a critical component of the economic and social infrastructures in which we live. In addition to voice services, these networks deliver alphanumeric text messages to the vast majority of wireless subscribers. To encourage the expansion of this new service, telecommunications companies offer connections between their networks and the Internet. The ramifications of such connections, however, have not been fully recognized. In this paper, we evaluate the security impact of the SMS interface on the availability of the cellular phone network. Specifically, we demonstrate the ability to deny voice service to cities the size of Washington D.C. and Manhattan with little more than a cable modem. Moreover, attacks targeting the entire United States are feasible with resources available to medium-sized zombie networks. This analysis begins with an exploration of the structure of cellular networks. We then characterize network behavior and explore a number of reconnaissance techniques aimed at effectively targeting attacks on these systems. We conclude by discussing countermeasures that mitigate or eliminate the threats introduced by these attacks.

There’s a New York Times article and a thread on Slashdot.

Posted on October 7, 2005 at 7:43 AMView Comments

Research in Behavioral Risk Analysis

I very am interested in this kind of research:

Network Structure, Behavioral Considerations and Risk Management in Interdependent Security Games

Interdependent security (IDS) games model situations where each player has to determine whether or not to invest in protection or security against an uncertain event knowing that there is some chance s/he will be negatively impacted by others who do not follow suit. IDS games capture a wide variety of collective risk and decision-making problems that include airline security, corporate governance, computer network security and vaccinations against diseases. This research project will investigate the marriage of IDS models with network formation models developed from social network theory and apply these models to problems in network security. Behavioral and controlled experiments will examine how human participants actually make choices under uncertainty in IDS settings. Computational aspects of IDS models will also be examined. To encourage and induce individuals to invest in cost-effective protection measures for IDS problems, we will examine several risk management strategies designed to foster cooperative behavior that include providing risk information, communication with others, economic incentives, and tipping strategies.

The proposed research is interdisciplinary in nature and should serve as an exciting focal point for researchers in computer science, decision and management sciences, economics, psychology, risk management, and policy analysis. It promises to advance our understanding of decision-making under risk and uncertainty for problems that are commonly faced by individuals, organizations, and nations. Through advances in computational methods one should be able to apply IDS models to large-scale problems. The research will also focus on weak links in an interdependent system and suggest risk management strategies for reducing individual and societal losses in the interconnected world in which we live.

Posted on September 15, 2005 at 7:05 AMView Comments

Snooping on Text by Listening to the Keyboard

Fascinating research out of Berkeley. Ed Felten has a good summary:

Li Zhuang, Feng Zhou, and Doug Tygar have an interesting new paper showing that if you have an audio recording of somebody typing on an ordinary computer keyboard for fifteen minutes or so, you can figure out everything they typed. The idea is that different keys tend to make slightly different sounds, and although you don’t know in advance which keys make which sounds, you can use machine learning to figure that out, assuming that the person is mostly typing English text. (Presumably it would work for other languages too.)

Read the rest.

The paper is on the Web. Here’s the abstract:

We examine the problem of keyboard acoustic emanations. We present a novel attack taking as input a 10-minute sound recording of a user typing English text using a keyboard, and then recovering up to 96% of typed characters. There is no need for a labeled training recording. Moreover the recognizer bootstrapped this way can even recognize random text such as passwords: In our experiments, 90% of 5-character random passwords using only letters can be generated in fewer than 20 attempts by an adversary; 80% of 10-character passwords can be generated in fewer than 75 attempts. Our attack uses the statistical constraints of the underlying content, English language, to reconstruct text from sound recordings without any labeled training data. The attack uses a combination of standard machine learning and speech recognition techniques, including cepstrum features, Hidden Markov Models, linear classification, and feedback-based incremental learning.

Posted on September 13, 2005 at 8:13 AMView Comments

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.