Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Socks

Cute, but not really for me.

Posted on February 19, 2010 at 4:57 PM • 6 Comments

Comments

BF SkinnerFebruary 19, 2010 5:06 PM

What? Your birthday comin' up and now I'm 'spose to take them back? Sheesh. They were custom. How many people HAVE 8 toes anyway?

Peter E RetepFebruary 19, 2010 5:55 PM

Clicky the Morse Code Squid did
whatever it did -
but who knows what Clicky did?

Clicky only speaks in Morse
and, to make it worse,
only underwater codes -

dynamic permuting codes
transforming through nodes
leave odd sequences for words

no pattern means same thing twice,
unless it repeats,
as, most likely, difference,

and sensed through its tentacles,
each in new poses
as each signal each receives,

with two long shifting axes
transforming themselves
by means cued from stores before.

Clicky the Morse Code Squid did
whatever it did -
but who knows what Clicky said?

(c) 2010 Peter E Retep

ModeratorFebruary 21, 2010 5:35 PM

That "invalid or unsupported form of compression" error can occur when Firefox requests a partial page from any Apache webserver that supports compression, because they disagree about what headers to send in that circumstance. This may happen with other webserver software too, but I'm not sure. The error seems to be very rare, since Firefox doesn't normally try to load only part of an HTML page, but once in a blue moon something triggers it. Reloading the page should clear the error, or failing that, clearing the browser cache will definitely do so.

Clive RobinsonFebruary 21, 2010 11:28 PM

@ AndrewDover,

I think you will find that this device (GT200) and it's brethren (AED-651) have been mentioned on this blog several times.

Most recently the AED-651 has been mentioned here and on the Cambridge Labs web site (lightbluetouchpaper.org).

Dr. Markus Kuhn who did a bit of an investigation for the BBC television Newsnight program.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/newsnight/...

And I belive from other news items that the UK company director(s) will be providing their side of the story in court at some point in the very near future (as far as legal bretherin are concerned).

Also some bloke called James Randi is offering up 1mUSD to anybody who cares to prove these devices and dowsing in the more general sense works.

Have a google for [dowsing "bomb detector"].

As for dowsing it's self it's a fun packed area of entertainment, full of strange charecters making claims about mystical lay lines, morphic resonance, standing stones, pigeon like abilities to detect magnetic fields and mystical water channels through solid rock etc etc.
And without a doubt there are people in places of authority who belive in it enough to spend a lot of tax payers money on it.

And where there is untestable belief and money naredowells are sure to be found, selling fabled fine clothes to Emperor's ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... ).

So far the best "theory" on the "pro" side (because it sounds credible and is virtualy untestable) is that, dowsing is a way of showing a very weak "gut reaction" from the residual monkey brain.

That is it is the body expressing a physical reaction to a primitave survival instinct we have to spot subtal natural indicators colour and type of vegitation physical land features such as slight depressions etc etc. That we have learnt by experiance indicate where water or food etc might be under the ground. Thus it's a bit like "hinky" detection experianced Police officers etc have.

There is some evidence that dowsers in their "home ground" favour areas that aerial photography shows has slight distinquishing features.

As for the anti side of the argument well lets just say it's a bit colourfull and definatly adds to the entertainment factor (James Randi is a showman to put it mildly ;)

Personaly I think it makes an interesting entertainment or side show like many other supposed "mystical properties of the mind, without rational explaination" activities.

Oddly though there have been one or two "scientific trials" which show it does not work, but... by more than you would expect on a random trial...

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