Second SHB Workshop Liveblogging (6)

The first session of the morning was "Foundations," which is kind of a catch-all for a variety of things that didn't really fit anywhere else. Rachel Greenstadt moderated.

Terence Taylor, International Council for the Live Sciences (suggested video to watch: Darwinian Security; Natural Security), talked about the lessons evolution teaches about living with risk. Successful species didn't survive by eliminating the risks of their environment, they survived by adaptation. Adaptation isn't always what you think. For example, you could view the collapse of the Soviet Union as a failure to adapt, but you could also view it as successful adaptation. Risk is good. Risk is essential for the survival of a society, because risk-takers are the drivers of change. In the discussion phase, John Mueller pointed out a key difference between human and biological systems: humans tend to respond dramatically to anomalous events (the anthrax attacks), while biological systems respond to sustained change. And David Livingstone Smith asked about the difference between biological adaptation that affects the reproductive success of an organism's genes, even at the expense of the organism, with security adaptation. (I recommend the book he edited: Natural Security: A Darwinian Approach to a Dangerous World.)

Andrew Odlyzko, University of Minnesota (suggested reading: Network Neutrality, Search Neutrality, and the Never-Ending Conflict between Efficiency and Fairness in Markets, Economics, Psychology, and Sociology of Security), discussed human-space vs. cyberspace. People cannot build secure systems -- we know that -- but people also cannot live with secure systems. We require a certain amount of flexibility in our systems. And finally, people don't need secure systems. We survive with an astounding amount of insecurity in our world. The problem with cyberspace is that it was originally conceived as separate from the physical world, and that it could correct for the inadequacies of the physical world. Really, the two are intertwined, and that human space more often corrects for the inadequacies of cyberspace. Lessons: build messy systems, not clean ones; create a web of ties to other systems; create permanent records.

danah boyd, Microsoft Research (suggested reading: Taken Out of Context -- American Teen Sociality in Networked Publics), does ethnographic studies of teens in cyberspace. Teens tend not to lie to their friends in cyberspace, but they lie to the system. Since an early age, they've been taught that they need to lie online to be safe. Teens regularly share their passwords: with their parents when forced, or with their best friend or significant other. This is a way of demonstrating trust. It's part of the social protocol for this generation. In general, teens don't use social media in the same way as adults do. And when they grow up, they won't use social media in the same way as today's adults do. Teens view privacy in terms of control, and take their cues about privacy from celebrities and how they use social media. And their sense of privacy is much more nuanced and complicated. In the discussion phase, danah wasn't sure whether the younger generation would be more or less susceptible to Internet scams than the rest of us -- they're not nearly as technically savvy as we might think they are. "The only thing that saves teenagers is fear of their parents"; they try to lock them out, and lock others out in the process. Socio-economic status matters a lot, in ways that she is still trying to figure out. There are three different types of social networks: personal networks, articulated networks, and behavioral networks, and they're different.

Mark Levine, Lancaster University (suggested reading: The Kindness of Crowds; Intra-group Regulation of Violence: Bystanders and the (De)-escalation of Violence), does social psychology. He argued against the common belief that groups are bad (mob violence, mass hysteria, peer group pressure). He collected data from UK CCTV cameras, searches for aggressive behavior, and studies when and how bystanders either help escalate or de-escalate the situations. Results: as groups get bigger, there is no increase of anti-social acts and a significant increase in pro-social acts. He has much more analysis and results, too complicated to summarize here. One key finding: when a third party intervenes in an aggressive interaction, it is much more likely to de-escalate. Basically, groups can act against violence. "When it comes to violence (and security), group processes are part of the solution -- not part of the problem?"

Jeff MacKie-Mason, University of Michigan (suggested reading: Humans are smart devices, but not programmable; Security when people matter; A Social Mechanism for Supporting Home Computer Security), is an economist: "Security problems are incentive problems." He discussed motivation, and how to design systems to take motivation into account. Humans are smart devices; they can't be programmed, but they can be influenced through the sciences of motivational behavior: microeconomics, game theory, social psychology, psychodynamics, and personality psychology. He gave a couple of general examples of how these theories can inform security system design.

Joe Bonneau, Cambridge University, talked about social networks like Facebook, and privacy. People misunderstand why privacy and security is important in social networking sites like Facebook. People underestimate of what Facebook really is; it really is a reimplementation of the entire Internet. "Everything on the Internet is becoming social," and that makes security different. Phishing is different, 419-style scams are different. Social context makes some scams easier; social networks are fun, noisy, and unpredictable. "People use social networking systems with their brain turned off." But social context can be used to spot frauds and anomalies, and can be used to establish trust.

Three more sessions to go. (I am enjoying liveblogging the event. It's helping me focus and pay closer attention.)

Adam Shostack's liveblogging is here. Ross Anderson's liveblogging is in his blog post's comments. Matt Blaze's audio is here.

Posted on June 12, 2009 at 9:54 AM • 6 Comments

Comments

ShaneJune 12, 2009 10:41 AM

"I am enjoying liveblogging the event. It's helping me focus and pay closer attention."

That's the best part! Thanks for all the links too!

Team AmericaJune 12, 2009 10:52 AM

"[...] and the Never-Ending Conflict between Efficiency and Fairness in Markets"

Efficient markets are fair. People have got to learn the difference between unequal and unfair. Inequality is a consequence of the central limit theorem.

Charles PlattJune 12, 2009 11:47 AM

Quote from Microsoft person: Teens are "not nearly as technically savvy as we might think they are." Absolutely right: They know how to press buttons, but they don't know what the buttons are doing. I recently sat in on (non-science) classes at a community college. Many students in teens and 20s gave presentations using data that they had stored online. They literally didn't seem to understand the distinction between web-based storage and local hard-drive storage. It was all just "storage" to them. If the class computer hadn't had an internet connection, they would have been extremely confused. For them, all computers have online access. Computing already means cloud computing, and operating systems have successfully erased the distinction between local and global.

JasonJune 12, 2009 1:34 PM

@Charles

That isn't merely a disease of youth, I have vendors who should know better expect the same thing when they walk in to do a presentation.

They don't understand why the laptop they brought can't be dropped on our network and given direct access to the Internet to VPN back to their office. It works from home!

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