Great Fear-Mongering Product: Subway Emergency Kit

Is Subivor even real?

Whether it is a train fire, a highrise building fire or worse. People should have more protection than a necktie, their shirt or paper towel to cover their mouth, nose and eyes. As you know an emergency can happen at anytime and in anyplace, leaving one vulnerable. Don't be a sitting duck. The Subivor® Subway Emergency Kit can aid you in seeing and breathing while exiting. This all-in-one compact, portable and easy to use subway emergency kit contains some items never seen before in a kit.

This could have won my Third Movie-Plot Threat Contest.

Posted on June 9, 2008 at 12:11 PM • 66 Comments

Comments

JasonJune 9, 2008 12:46 PM

Just because something is possible doesn't mean it's likely.

Anyone who was prepared for what happened on 09/11 and the toxic dust cloud it released was either in on the plot or excessively paranoid.

Are you prepared for every possible thing that could possibly happen at every possible moment?

Look out, a piece of space debris might be screaming toward you RIGHT NOW!

You could be drinking water contaminated with human growth hormone or anti-depressants RIGHT NOW!

A rat may have left a little bonus on the lid of that can of beans you are opening RIGHT NOW!

Common sense and rational thinking are normally good enough to protect us. Trying to consider all of the "what ifs" that occur outside of every day living is a recipe for psychosis.

Prepare for the worst, but expect the best. That's my motto and it lends itself to a balancing act between agoraphobic paranoia and blissful ignorance.

Never HappenJune 9, 2008 12:59 PM

@Jason

"Are you prepared for every possible thing that could possibly happen at every possible moment?"

How is that possibly relevant? This is a $16 - $25 emergency kit for subway riders. It costs as little as the first aid kit you may already have in your car. You toss it in your bag/purse/briefcase and forget about it.

You don't want to buy it, so don't buy it. What's the big deal?

MaxJune 9, 2008 1:00 PM

Oooo, all sorts of fun scenarios for the movie version.

1. There are several children on the subway with you. Do you give your mask to one of them? Which one? What about the pregnant woman?

2. A gangbanger on the subway car decides that he need the mask more than you (or the child or the pregnant woman) Can you reach the 7 inch Orange Pry bar in time to hold off him/her?

Nomen PublicusJune 9, 2008 1:01 PM

Two thing cross my mind.

1. It's not an altogether daft idea. During WW2 it was widely believed that the Germans would use poison gas at some point. The government issued everyone with a "gas mask" in a cardboard container with a string shoulder strap. Young children had animal mask versions, babies had little protection suits. Everybody was supposed to carry their gas mask whenever they left home - there were fines to encourage this. In the event, the masks were never needed and it is said that many people used the boxes to carry their sandwiches etc.

2. I doubt that anyone will manage to get one of the kits onto a plane. Think of the damage a terrorist could do with a "7 inch pry bar" while wearing a mask!

dragonfrogJune 9, 2008 1:01 PM

As far as I can make out from the picture, the "SURVIVAL MASK disposable anti-fog facemask, [which] protects against Toxic Smoke,Concrete Dust, Debris, Radio Active Dirty Bomb - radio - Active particle matter, Biological / Epidemic (e.g Influenza, Small Pox, and Dry spores (e.g. Anthrax Contaminants)" is one of those little paper dust masks you might use when sanding or scraping paint.

I wonder if that's really any better than a shirt?

I love that it also contains a moist towelette "To remove dirt or debris from your hands and face without water" - because what good is it to survive a subway bombing, only to show up in the newspaper with schmutz on your face?

JasonJune 9, 2008 1:06 PM

@Never Happen

There is no "big deal."

This is another in a line of products and "feel good" merchandise geared toward capitalizing on the fears and misperceptions of the masses.

It is the very pinnacle of capitalism, almost beautiful in that regard.

That doesn't change the fact that it preys on the psychological quirks of the human mind to make a buck.

Doesn't everything?

CliveJune 9, 2008 1:12 PM

"The efficacy of this product is not guaranteed for persons with substantial facial hair."

Yet another reason you don't want the product.

JasonJune 9, 2008 1:16 PM

http://www.subivor.com/safetytips.html

[quote]
WATCH OUT FOR PEOPLE WHO:
Appear to be acting unusual or suspicious
Appear to be conducting surveillance using cameras and/or video
Appear to be acting lost or appear to be wandering
Abandon items then leave the area quickly
[/quote]

Every item except the last one is way to generalized.

Maybe someone isn't "acting lost" but is actually lost. Why bother trying to assist them when you can just call the police instead?

Is someone conducting surveillance or just taking some photos? Are you qualified to judge? No, just call the police and let them sort it out.

What constitutes "unusual or suspicious?"

Never HappenJune 9, 2008 1:19 PM

@Jason

Subivor: nobody has to buy one.

Government programs ostensibly designed to protect us: everybody has to buy one. Don't think so? Try not paying your taxes.

Which one cost you more money last year? Which one gave you a choice of paying for something you didn't want nor use, or not paying for something you didn't want nor use?

That's the pinnacle of capitalism.

AnonymousJune 9, 2008 1:38 PM

Never Happen:

Everyone who works in a highrise should have a parachute too. Everyone who drives an underwater tunnel should have SCUBA gear. Everyone on a train should have an inflatable impact suit.

And kevlar vests for everyone, just in case.

The major irony of this kit is that if someone saw you toting this they'd probably assume you were up to no good.

JustinJune 9, 2008 1:40 PM

Maybe it's just me, but I can't seem to find a place on the site that would let you actually buy one.

John RidleyJune 9, 2008 1:57 PM

It's just a breathing mask, a flashlight, and one or two odds and ends that make sense. I know several people who carry lightweight disposable anti-smoke-inhalation masks when on vacation, to increase chances of getting out of building fires, etc. They're cheap and small, easy to pack. They're not a new thing.

I know people who carry CPR barriers even though they'll probably never use them. Most AEDs and fire extinguishers in the world will never get used either.

I don't like the idea of spending millions to protect against crazy threats, but spending

Emergency HoodJune 9, 2008 2:19 PM

There "used" to be a smoke hood device selling around $85.00, named evac smoke hood or something like that. You put it on when your plane crashed, and there was fire and smoke around you (assuming you didn't first die from the fire or crash). Eventually the product was totally recalled because once you put it on, there is a chance you would die from carbon monoxide poisioning or something like that.

GweihirJune 9, 2008 2:21 PM

Hmmm. Orange crowbar, where have I seen this before?

I think Gordon Freeman might have been involved in the design! If that is true, then as a bonus you can use the crowbar to fight aliens that may invade the subway!

Never HappenJune 9, 2008 2:21 PM

@Anonymous

"So, are you prepared in case a helicopter falls on your head while you are walking down the street?"

Are you selling a $20 product that's convenient to carry, and that offers reasonable protection against that occurence? If so, I might be prepared soon. What's you site?

@John Ridley

"spending

Hold on there, Mr. Ridley. You're sounding way too reasonable. Where's you knee-jerk anti-capitalist reaction against yet another one of these ruthless companies exploiting the poor, helpless masses who can't possibly refrain from clicking on the BuyNow! button of any website that says "Boo!" ?

GweihirJune 9, 2008 2:30 PM

Seriously, this thing may put you in danger. What are the chances other paniced passengers will try to get it from you and may harm you in the process? I would say pretty high.

Side note: If you take into account the effort of lugging it around, the cost/benefit analyis is abysmally bad.

Always happeningJune 9, 2008 2:34 PM

@ Never Happen:

Losing business are we? Don't worry...tons of people have hammers in their car to break glass when they drive into the lake. You'll still sell plenty of these kits.

There's sixty born every hour.

xd0sJune 9, 2008 3:09 PM

@Jason

Just for clarity:

"Look out, a piece of space debris might be screaming toward you RIGHT NOW!"

Depending on the tolerance of your "toward" this isn't a might, but rather 10s of millions ARE screaming toward you right now!

Luckily most are also at least several lightyears from our location and not likely to hit you before you, the planet, the solar system, and ,maybe this arm of the galaxy move a bit out of the way. :)

That said, the promo is clearly scare tactics, but to sell a product that some might buy or want anyway. (IMO)

Never HappenJune 9, 2008 3:15 PM

@Always Happening

"There's sixty born every hour."

Poor dears. I know, let's force the hapless to pay for regulatory agencies that will protect them from themselves!

We can subsidize the program with a new tax on anyone even thinking of becoming an evil capitalist!

We'll call it the Only A Fool Thinks He Should Make His Own Decisions tax.

Why would we want entrepreneurs to risk their own capital to try to match product ideas to the wants and needs of individuals who choose to bear a particular risk, when government officials can just decide for is what's risky and what's not, and force all of us to use our money to pay to support their programs?

Maybe a new Subway Tax to pay for new smoke vents in the 20 largest subway systems nationwide. Or mandate a retrofit of all the subway cars to install passenger oxygen masks like on planes. That sounds cheap. And the best part is, I don't even ride the subway, but I'll get to help pay the tax.

Oh well, how expensive could it get? Homeland Security in the USA has been a pretty cheap idea so far, no? All we need is more taxpayers. Good thing there are 180 born every minute.

Yeah, you're right. The capitalist businessmen are the ones who can force every last ounce of wealth from our paychecks. That's why you see their subtractions right on your paystub.

Clive RobinsonJune 9, 2008 3:17 PM

The simple fact is what is proportianate and what is not?

Those who know me will confirm I am rarely without my backpack (even when wearing a suit to a business meeting). And in times past I was never without a Swiss Army knife andmultitool (9/11 has put paid to that these days).

When in my home city I usually do not carry much in my back pack (hat gloves something to read/do and something to drink) along with a few essentials most carry such as the mobile phone pens paper etc.

However when out of my "manor" or abroad I tend to also carry a first aid kit needle thread and a bottle of spirit, space blanket local maps (street and transport) as well as enough food/water for 24H a torch, sighting compas and multi-tool and a change of cloths and wash kit.

Oddly when I look back on it the only times I have realy needed the first aid kit has been within walking distance of my house (London roads are realy not safe, and no I am not talking street criminals althought they don't help) and when I fell down a cliff and had to stich myself up.

As regards the likes of a smoke hood no I would not carry one. I have never been in the situation where I would need one. I do occasionaly carry extras when out and about like splints sleeping bag, bivi, flax based string, flint and steel and have occasionaly needed them (although you can usually find good cover from the weather if you look.

The only real rule I have is "If it cannot go in my pockets or on my back it dosn't go"

I guess what you take with you depends on your outlook in life and your life experiances.

Most would be surprised just how much usefull stuff you can get into a couple of tabaco tins and an old tupperware lunch box. The tins drop easily in your coat pocket and the lunch box in your bag.

That being said a lady friend of mine recones all a girl needs is "lippy, comb change of nickers and a platinum credit card"...

Clive RobinsonJune 9, 2008 3:29 PM

The simple fact is what is proportianate and what is not?

Those who know me will confirm I am rarely without my backpack (even when wearing a suit to a business meeting). And in times past I was never without a Swiss Army knife and multitool (9/11 has put paid to that these days as pen knife = criminal as far as UK police are cocerned).

When in my home city I usually do not carry much in my back pack (hat gloves something to read/do and something to drink) along with a few essentials most carry such as the mobile phone pens paper etc.

However when out of my "manor" or abroad I tend to also carry a first aid kit needle thread and a bottle of spirit, space blanket local maps (street and transport) as well as enough food/water for 24H a torch, sighting compas and multi-tool and a change of cloths and wash kit.

Oddly when I look back on it the only times I have realy needed the first aid kit has been within walking distance of my house (London roads are realy not safe, and no I am not talking street criminals althought they don't help) and when I fell down a cliff and had to stich myself up.

As regards the likes of a smoke hood/mask no I would not carry one. >y cycling mask is probably better and I have never been in the situation where I would need one.

I used to occasionaly carry extras when out and about like splints sleeping bag, bivi, flax based string, flint and steel and have occasionaly needed them (although you can usually find good cover from the weather if you look.

The only real rule I have is "If it cannot go in my pockets or on my back it dosn't go", I like to keep my hands free for putting in my pockets 8)

I guess what you take with you depends on your outlook in life and your life experiances and where you are going.

Most would be surprised just how much usefull stuff you can get into a couple of tabaco tins and an old tupperware lunch box. The tins drop easily in your coat pocket and the lunch box in your bag.

That being said a lady friend of mine recones all a girl needs is "lippy, comb, change of nickers and a platinum credit card"...

JoshuaJune 9, 2008 3:36 PM

The "pry bar" troubles me a bit. Mainly because pretty much all public transport I've ever been on has well-marked emergency exits with clear instructions for use posted by. And then some idiot with a pry bar comes by and shatters the window and a bunch of people in the overturned subway car are now covered in sharp glass that's cutting them. Doesn't seem safe to me.

And in a structural fire, odds are you could find something else handy, a piece of furniture or an appliance, to smash the window with.

Boy ScoutJune 9, 2008 3:43 PM

1. This has got to be a joke, but I'll comment anyway.
2. Way overpriced, especially the stupid "Survival Mask."
3. A small first aid kit is always handy. Perhaps just throw in a "LifeHammer" to a normal travel first aid kit and you'll have everything the Subivor has and a lot more.

Jay LevittJune 9, 2008 3:46 PM

I like the fact that one of the selling points is that it contains items "never seen before in a kit".

I would like to go one step further: I am selling a kit that contains items never seen in a kit before - and which I personally guarantee will NEVER BEEN SEEN AGAIN. This kit includes, but is not limited to:

1 jar Skippy Superchunk peanut butter, 3/4 full
1 wrapper torn from HP laser printer paper
1 Chemtronics ultraJet duster system (with nozzle)
1 Staples low-effort stapler
1 three-legged cat
Two (2) Mr. Show DVDs

The odds that you will need all these items in any one emergency are, I admit, slim. But isn't it better to be prepared?

Kathy JJune 9, 2008 3:48 PM

Notice that it protects against a Radio Active Dirty Bomb. Not a manually detonated one?

rick fornoJune 9, 2008 4:00 PM


Umm, okay. Absurdness of this product aside, you have a full-face hood on and need to whistle for help in a contaminated environment....so the idiot user breaks the seal to use the whistle and thus gets exposed to whatever is there.

Brilliant. Great way to control the growth of the global gene pool.....

brasscountJune 9, 2008 4:05 PM

@Never Happen

So, in short, its really not a problem to sell FUD. In fact, that's capitalism, and its a good thing.

It is however a problem if its a tax. That's a bad thing, and the government sowing paranoia.

So, what happens when New York Transit police applies for the DHS grant to get these for their monthly pass holders? Is that a tax, or is it capitalism?

Seems like the next logical step for the Subivor people is to patent this particular disaster recovery kit concept, in order to ensure the maximum sale of their capitalist product. After all, a unique idea should always protect its inventor to allow them the maximum capital gain for their intellectual efforts.

KaukomieliJune 9, 2008 4:09 PM

@Nomen publicus

"During WW2"

Last time i looked WW2 was over by half a century... ;)

JilaraJune 9, 2008 4:26 PM

Just think, if people in China, after an earthquake, had one of these with them, they could breathe through the concrete-dust-filtering mask while they either attempted self-rescue with their 7-inch pry bar, or blew on their whistle to attract rescuers. (Warning: must remove mask to blow whistle.)

We need to sell a zillion of these to China and help with the trade deficit! (Oh wait, most of these items probably come from China...)

periJune 9, 2008 4:41 PM

@Kathy J "Radio Active Dirty Bomb"

I suspect by "Radio Active" instead of radio activated they meant "Radioactive!" and I also suspect by "Dirty Bomb" they meant "Radioactive!". Ducks, covers and "Duck and Cover" also protect against "Radioactive!". I was sad to see none of those were included.

Never HappenJune 9, 2008 4:51 PM

@brasscount

"So, what happens when New York Transit police applies for the DHS grant to get these for their monthly pass holders? Is that a tax, or is it capitalism?"

Are you kidding? Last time I checked, the DHS "grants", salaries, benefits, subsidies, loans, and any other source of "DHS wealth" came from tax money. Tax money comes from taxpayers. Which means taxpayers are the ones who "bought" (involuntarily) all the kits paid for with that tax money.

Too bad that those buyers won't necessarily be the same people who receive the kits.

That doesn't sound much like capitalism, does it.

You're right to (mildly) rail against such a situation, but what you're speaking out against is not capitalism, but corporatism. That's why it's so ironic when a leftist decries capitalism whilst he points at corporatism: capitalism is the arch enemy of corporatism in all its guises, and would banish corporatism fully. Yet people who observe the unjust consequences of corporatism always rally to the same cry: "Down with capitalism!" (see here: http://www.mises.org/story/2866 )

It's tragic (or comic, depending on your worldview.)

"Seems like the next logical step for the Subivor people is to patent this particular disaster recovery kit concept, in order to ensure the maximum sale of their capitalist product."

Sounds smart. And do patents last forever? No. (I sure doubt anyone could patent such a kit, at any rate.)

"...a unique idea should always protect its inventor to allow them the maximum capital gain for their intellectual efforts."

Well, enforcement of the patent does the protecting. The idea doesn't protect its inventor of its own volition.

RoyJune 9, 2008 5:15 PM

When you try going through security with this, they will certainly confiscate your kit and may inflict more 'scrutiny' on you.

I've used pry bars in various situations, even a twelve-footer. But 7 inches?

periJune 9, 2008 5:57 PM

@Never Happen "Yeah. I bet these people think that type of product is just utterly worthless"

Had you actually read the story itself you would have discovered that this product failed miserably. He bought 10,000 and sold a "few hundred." If you had read that you probably wouldn't be suggesting a patent "sounds good" when Subivor is desperately trying to find ways to recoupe the investment on a failed product.


Never Happen: "This is a $16 - $25 emergency kit for subway riders. It costs as little as the first aid kit you may already have in your car. You toss it in your bag/purse/briefcase and forget about it."

You would also be tossing it in your bag/purse/briefcase with the DNA adulteratometer, Anti-laser-pointer eyeglasses and "Alertness alert" heartbeat monitor based on the same logic. The whole point of the Movie-Plot Threat Contest was that if you try to protect against every one in a billion risk eventually you need a moving truck to get your bag/purse/briefcase anywhere.

Given you have shown about as much insight as a libertarian ELIZA I have to assume Never Happen is a chat bot. Let's see if any of these work.

!help
!root
!admin
!mute
!quit
!exit
!debug
!mode
!mode libertarian=off
!mode libertarian=false
!mode libertarian=0
!mode language=spanish
!mode jealousLatinLover=on
!mode jealousLatinLover=true
!mode jealousLatinLover=1

Never HappenJune 9, 2008 6:35 PM

@peri

"Had you actually read the story itself you would have discovered that this product failed miserably. He bought 10,000 and sold a "few hundred." "

So what's wrong with that? That's capitalism working. Capitalism is not without failed companies. If people don't buy enough of your product/service for you to stay in business, you go out of business. Thousands of products fail every year, and entrepreneurs learn as much as they can from their own and others' mistakes. Similar products with fewer shortcomings may sell well. Or they may not.

You're not honestly saying that this guy shouldn't try to sell these kits because he might fail to sell enough of them? Let's shed a tear for the entrepreneur? I doubt that.

The most important point to remember is that you're already paying hundreds of times more of your own money per year for "protection" of many kinds that you don't want or need. And you have no choice in paying. It's called "taxation", and it's not voluntary. Whether or not you buy this guy's product IS voluntary.

Which method do you think is the more nefarious way of separating you from your "protection" money?

When an entrepreneur fails in attempting to provide a security product, failing with his own money, not yours, you've lost next to nothing. Yet all you can do is claim his product is worthless, or promotes fear, or both? Curious the contempt you show for the capitalist, while showing none for the statist.

"You would also be tossing it in your bag/purse/briefcase with the DNA adulteratometer, Anti-laser-pointer eyeglasses and "Alertness alert" heartbeat monitor based on the same logic."

Well, no. Remember Bruce's blog title: Great Fear-Mongering Product: Subway Emergency Kit.

This is a product for people who ride the subway.

One can correctly presume that most of these subway riders are not pilots, so they won't need the anti-laser-pointer eyeglasses. I can't remember what the other two products you mention do.

But this is about preventing or lessening harm from smoke or noxious gas in a subway. Fire in a subway is hardly a one-in-a-billion risk.

I carry several such items, with no need to follow any "logic" that dictates I therefore need to buy a truckfull of more items. Total weight of my bag is less than 5 pounds, and total cost is under $60.

Jolly SwagmanJune 9, 2008 7:01 PM

Awwww, Bruce is just jealous because he can't use the mask.
"The efficacy of this product is not guaranteed for persons with substantial facial hair"

AnonymousJune 9, 2008 7:04 PM

@ Never Happen "So what's wrong with that? That's capitalism working."

Well it seems the chat bot is still torturing anti-capitalist rhetoric out of absolutely everything whether it is there or not. Not even in a spanish accent. Let's try...


' OR '1'; DROP TABLES


"yields a falsehood when appended to its own quotation" yields a falsehood when appended to its own quotation

Pat CahalanJune 9, 2008 11:07 PM

@ Jay Levitt

OMG, I want to order two. Can I get a third three if I buy two? How much for shipping and handling?

That joke aside, here's another...

If someone in the transit authority decides that you're acting strangely on a subway platform, and decides to detain you, they're going to be mighty suspicious when they find this sort of gear in your bag. "This looks like the sort of stuff someone would pack if they were planning a terrorist event, and wanted to be able to get away!"

John BJune 10, 2008 12:51 AM

Off-topic:

"In a February interview with The Associated Press, Mayor Robert Cluck said trace concentrations of one pharmaceutical had been found in treated drinking water, but he declined to name it. He said revealing the name in the post-9/11 world could cause a terrorist to intentionally release more of the drug, causing harm to residents."

From this article: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080609/ap_on_re_us/...

RealistJune 10, 2008 5:50 AM

Re Max:
"1. There are several children on the subway with you. Do you give your mask to one of them? Which one? What about the pregnant woman?"

Of course not! What a stupid question.

PedantJune 10, 2008 5:56 AM

"7 inch Orange Pry bar – To knock a window out of it's setting or to shatter it"

How credible is a company that can't spell "its"? Can't they afford to hire even one literate person?

GordonSJune 10, 2008 6:30 AM

@Never Happen

"Well, no. Remember Bruce's blog title: Great Fear-Mongering Product: Subway Emergency Kit.

This is a product for people who ride the subway.

One can correctly presume that most of these subway riders are not pilots, so they won't need the anti-laser-pointer eyeglasses. I can't remember what the other two products you mention do."

I don't think you're getting the point here...

The point is that any idiot can easily come up with 101 more rare events to create a useless product to 'protect aganist'. And, apparently, as long as the price is right, regardless of real risk, there will be people like you who will buy it.

Frankly, the price is irrelevant - it doesn't matter if this crap is being given away for free. There is no need to be afraid of _everything_! I honestly think this would have won the movie plot contest!

As the ever-level-headed Clive pointed out, it's about what is proportianate - and this certainly isn't!

From your comments on this blog I can only assume that you have some kind of vested interest in this (ridiculous) product.

Noble_SerfJune 10, 2008 6:58 AM

If I buy this, can I discard the duct tape and sheets of plastic?

I'm running out of room in my briefcase.

bobJune 10, 2008 7:09 AM

Dont know if the subivor one is legit, however they have been selling the "Evac-U-8" hood for decades, marketing to nervous airline passengers and light plane operators (to my shock, I just discovered they had been recalled by the mfr [dupont] with no replacement, evidently they did not filter out CO - that seems a pretty basic requirement; CT types will point out that this was at the behest of the airlines which benefit more from dead victims than survivors), however, theres a whole page of alternatives here: http://www.saferamerica.com/...


As far as utility, I dont know. For an airline passenger the likelihood of a) and inflight fire that b) you get on the ground (intact!) in time to c)egress the bird seems a pretty small set of results.

For small planes, inflight fires are possibly more common (no reliable statistics kept), the likelihood of a "good" landing (ie can walk away; as opposed to the subset "great" landing - walk away AND aircraft reusable) is INFINITELY more likely and for the actual operator of the aircraft might be a good investment.

For subway use, I believe a Kahr PM-9 or equiv would be a required 'piece' of equipment in the kit, too; otherwise someone would just take it away from you.

JeroenJune 10, 2008 7:17 AM

While carrying a kit like this seems excessive, it's not fundamentally different from carrying a pocket knife, USB memory stich and miniature flashlight, as many of us geeks do:

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/...

In fact, I carry that exact flashlight and a slight variant of that pocket knife with me at all times.

GordonSJune 10, 2008 7:54 AM

@Jeroen

I tend to carry around a USB stick with me a lot. I also wear a watch. And carry a wallet. And a mobile phone (cellphone for you Americans ;)

There are however two fundamental differences:

1. I use these items all the time

2. I don't carry these items out of some irrational, misguided fear

Never HappenJune 10, 2008 11:26 AM

@GordonS

"The point is that any idiot can easily come up with 101 more rare events to create a useless product to 'protect aganist'. And, apparently, as long as the price is right, regardless of real risk, there will be people like you who will buy it."

Aahhh, so THAT'S the point. Well, thanks, and allow me to retort:

So what?

Let me quote the great Mr. Poobah, since I think he summed it up nicely:

"If you don't want it don't buy it.
Just don't bore me."

Jay LevittJune 10, 2008 12:36 PM

@Pat: I'm sorry, but due to pers^h^h^h^hpopular demand, the peanut butter portion of the kit has been discontinued.

@Never Happen: I haven't seen any argument against the right of the idiot to sell the kit. But then we have the right to laugh at him.

kaJune 10, 2008 1:23 PM

I don't really follow the arguments on what is 'proportional'. Who appointed anyone else arbitrator of what is proportional for another free individual?

The subway kit is probably worthless junk. But for regular subway riders it does not seem out of proportion to prepare for the sort of emergencies that are possible in the subway. When I go hiking, camping or hunting I prepare for the sort of emergencies that can come up during those activities. I prepare with a backback that could allow me to survive for several days (assuming some sort of water - potable or not - could be found) while waiting for rescue. Friends of mine leave with barely anything more than a bottle of water. Who is out of proportion? Neither of us.

"Does not seem" is subjective. Maybe it is, maybe it isn't. But I can't possibly see how that is for anyone to say other than the guy riding the subway. Its his neck on the line, let him prepare for it however he sees fit.

periJune 10, 2008 3:15 PM

@ka "Who appointed anyone else arbitrator of what is proportional for another free individual?"

You know that's a really good point but sadly you failed to make it within 24 hours of the initial post so I am sure you know the person in question is probably already en route to Guantanamo Bay. I guess we should be more responsible with that power?

kaJune 10, 2008 3:46 PM

@peri "I am sure you know the person in question is probably already en route to Guantanamo Bay."

I hope he remembered to pack is towel.

periJune 10, 2008 5:02 PM

@ka "I hope he remembered to pack is towel."

That would be a small consolation considering the rumor of an unabridged collection of Vogon poetry.

JohnMarch 5, 2010 9:07 PM

I personally tested the mask over an oil fire. Breathing was effortless. The mask is made by Evacutech. It UL lab tested and approved. Your NOT getting this in home Depot. They made a big time mask in a purse size package.
Stuck in an elevator, need to bypass a locked door or pop out a train window - thepry bar is a smart addition.
Stuck in stairwell above the smoke - alert people to your presense with the loud whistle.
The flashlight is no pen lite. Its an 8 LED light and compares to a full size flash light.
When you are out of danger and need to wash off, the towelette is field tested to clean you off better than a wipe. Hunters and army use this quality to remove camo paint.
The colors choices are reflective straps.
They made a smart kit...

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Photo of Bruce Schneier by Per Ervland.

Schneier on Security is a personal website. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of Co3 Systems, Inc..