Entries Tagged "Sudan"

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Laptop Seizures in Sudan

According to CNN:

Sudanese security forces have begun seizing laptop computers entering the country to check on the information stored on them as part of new security measures.

One state security source said the laptops are searched and returned in one day and that the procedure was introduced because pornographic films and photographs were entering Sudan.

U.N. officials, aid agency workers, businessmen and journalists who regularly visit Sudan worry the security of sensitive and confidential information such as medical, legal and financial records on their computers could be at risk.

Authorities have cracked down on organizations like Medecins Sans Frontieres, the International Rescue Committee who have published reports on huge numbers of rapes in the violent Darfur region.

(More commentary here.)

While the stated reason is pornography, anyone bringing a computer into the country should be concerned about personal information, writing that might be deemed political by the Sudanese authorities, confidential business information, and so on.

And this should be a concern regardless of the border you cross. Your privacy rights when trying to enter a country are minimal, and this kind of thing could happen anywhere. (I have heard anecdotal stories about Israel doing this, but don’t have confirmation.)

If you’re bringing a laptop across an international border, you should clean off all unnecessary files and encrypt the rest.

EDITED TO ADD (9/15): This is legal in the U.S.

EDITED TO ADD (9/30): More about the legality of this in the U.S.

Posted on September 13, 2006 at 6:44 AMView Comments

Counterfeiting in the Sudan

It’s an NPR audio story: “Peace Also Brings New Currency to Southern Sudan.”

Sudanese currency is printed on plain paper with very inconsistent color and image quality, and has no security features — not even serial numbers. How does that work?

While [he] concedes the bills are poorly printed, he’s not worried about counterfeiting. This is because anyone who does it will be put in front of a firing squad and shot.

That’s one way to solve the problem.

Posted on June 6, 2005 at 7:46 AMView Comments

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.