Entries Tagged "RFID"

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KeeLoq Still Broken

That’s the key entry system used by Chrysler, Daewoo, Fiat, General Motors, Honda, Toyota, Lexus, Volvo, Volkswagen, Jaguar, and probably others. It’s broken:

The KeeLoq encryption algorithm is widely used for security relevant applications, e.g., in the form of passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) transponders for car immobilizers and in various access control and Remote Keyless Entry (RKE) systems, e.g., for opening car doors and garage doors.

We present the first successful DPA (Differential Power Analysis) attacks on numerous commercially available products employing KeeLoq. These so-called side-channel attacks are based on measuring and evaluating the power consumption of a KeeLoq device during its operation. Using our techniques, an attacker can reveal not only the secret key of remote controls in less than one hour, but also the manufacturer key of the corresponding receivers in less than one day. Knowing the manufacturer key allows for creating an arbitrary number of valid new keys and generating new remote controls.

We further propose a new eavesdropping attack for which monitoring of two ciphertexts, sent from a remote control employing KeeLoq code hopping (car key, garage door opener, etc.), is sufficient to recover the device key of the remote control. Hence, using the methods described by us, an attacker can clone a remote control from a distance and gain access to a target that is protected by the claimed to be “highly secure” KeeLoq algorithm.

We consider our attacks to be of serious practical interest, as commercial KeeLoq access control systems can be overcome with modest effort.

I’ve written about this before, but the above link has much better data.

EDITED TO ADD (4/4): A good article.

Posted on April 4, 2008 at 6:03 AMView Comments

Dutch RFID Transit Card Hacked

The Dutch RFID public transit card, which has already cost the government $2B — no, that’s not a typo — has been hacked even before it has been deployed:

The first reported attack was designed by two students at the University of Amsterdam, Pieter Siekerman and Maurits van der Schee. They analyzed the single-use ticket and showed its vulnerabilities in a report. They also showed how a used single-use card could be given eternal life by resetting it to its original “unused” state.

The next attack was on the Mifare Classic chip, used on the normal ticket. Two German hackers, Karsten Nohl and Henryk Plotz, were able to remove the coating on the Mifare chip and photograph the internal circuitry. By studying the circuitry, they were able to deduce the secret cryptographic algorithm used by the chip. While this alone does not break the chip, it certainly gives future hackers a stepping stone on which to stand. On Jan. 8, 2008, they released a statement abut their work.

Most of the links are in Dutch; there isn’t a whole lot of English-language press about this. But the Dutch Parliament recently invited the students to give testimony; they’re more than a little bit interested how $2B could be wasted.

My guess is the system was designed by people who don’t understand security, and therefore thought it was easy.

EDITED TO ADD (2/13): More info.

Posted on January 21, 2008 at 6:35 AMView Comments

RFID in People Access Security Services (PASS) Cards

Last November, the Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee of the Department of Homeland Security recommended against putting RFID chips in identity cards. DHS ignored them, and went ahead with the project anyway. Now, the Smart Card Alliance is criticizing the DHS’s RFID program for cross-border identification, basically saying that it is making the very mistakes the Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee warned about.

Posted on May 30, 2007 at 6:50 AMView Comments

Cloning RFID Chips Made by HID

Remember the Cisco fiasco from BlackHat 2005? Next in the stupid box is RFID-card manufacturer HID, who has prevented Chris Paget from presenting research on how to clone those cards.

Won’t these companies ever learn? HID won’t prevent the public from learning about the vulnerability, and they will end up looking like heavy handed goons. And it’s not even secret; Paget demonstrated the attack to me and others at the RSA Conference last month.

There’s a difference between a security flaw and information about a security flaw; HID needs to fix the first and not worry about the second. Full disclosure benefits us all.

EDITED TO ADD (2/28): The ACLU is presenting instead.

Posted on February 28, 2007 at 12:00 PMView Comments

In Praise of Security Theater

While visiting some friends and their new baby in the hospital last week, I noticed an interesting bit of security. To prevent infant abduction, all babies had RFID tags attached to their ankles by a bracelet. There are sensors on the doors to the maternity ward, and if a baby passes through, an alarm goes off.

Infant abduction is rare, but still a risk. In the last 22 years, about 233 such abductions have occurred in the United States. About 4 million babies are born each year, which means that a baby has a 1-in-375,000 chance of being abducted. Compare this with the infant mortality rate in the U.S. — one in 145 — and it becomes clear where the real risks are.

And the 1-in-375,000 chance is not today’s risk. Infant abduction rates have plummeted in recent years, mostly due to education programs at hospitals.

So why are hospitals bothering with RFID bracelets? I think they’re primarily to reassure the mothers. Many times during my friends’ stay at the hospital the doctors had to take the baby away for this or that test. Millions of years of evolution have forged a strong bond between new parents and new baby; the RFID bracelets are a low-cost way to ensure that the parents are more relaxed when their baby was out of their sight.

Security is both a reality and a feeling. The reality of security is mathematical, based on the probability of different risks and the effectiveness of different countermeasures. We know the infant abduction rates and how well the bracelets reduce those rates. We also know the cost of the bracelets, and can thus calculate whether they’re a cost-effective security measure or not. But security is also a feeling, based on individual psychological reactions to both the risks and the countermeasures. And the two things are different: You can be secure even though you don’t feel secure, and you can feel secure even though you’re not really secure.

The RFID bracelets are what I’ve come to call security theater: security primarily designed to make you feel more secure. I’ve regularly maligned security theater as a waste, but it’s not always, and not entirely, so.

It’s only a waste if you consider the reality of security exclusively. There are times when people feel less secure than they actually are. In those cases — like with mothers and the threat of baby abduction — a palliative countermeasure that primarily increases the feeling of security is just what the doctor ordered.

Tamper-resistant packaging for over-the-counter drugs started to appear in the 1980s, in response to some highly publicized poisonings. As a countermeasure, it’s largely security theater. It’s easy to poison many foods and over-the-counter medicines right through the seal — with a syringe, for example — or to open and replace the seal well enough that an unwary consumer won’t detect it. But in the 1980s, there was a widespread fear of random poisonings in over-the-counter medicines, and tamper-resistant packaging brought people’s perceptions of the risk more in line with the actual risk: minimal.

Much of the post-9/11 security can be explained by this as well. I’ve often talked about the National Guard troops in airports right after the terrorist attacks, and the fact that they had no bullets in their guns. As a security countermeasure, it made little sense for them to be there. They didn’t have the training necessary to improve security at the checkpoints, or even to be another useful pair of eyes. But to reassure a jittery public that it’s OK to fly, it was probably the right thing to do.

Security theater also addresses the ancillary risk of lawsuits. Lawsuits are ultimately decided by juries, or settled because of the threat of jury trial, and juries are going to decide cases based on their feelings as well as the facts. It’s not enough for a hospital to point to infant abduction rates and rightly claim that RFID bracelets aren’t worth it; the other side is going to put a weeping mother on the stand and make an emotional argument. In these cases, security theater provides real security against the legal threat.

Like real security, security theater has a cost. It can cost money, time, concentration, freedoms and so on. It can come at the cost of reducing the things we can do. Most of the time security theater is a bad trade-off, because the costs far outweigh the benefits. But there are instances when a little bit of security theater makes sense.

We make smart security trade-offs — and by this I mean trade-offs for genuine security — when our feeling of security closely matches the reality. When the two are out of alignment, we get security wrong. Security theater is no substitute for security reality, but, used correctly, security theater can be a way of raising our feeling of security so that it more closely matches the reality of security. It makes us feel more secure handing our babies off to doctors and nurses, buying over-the-counter medicines, and flying on airplanes — closer to how secure we should feel if we had all the facts and did the math correctly.

Of course, too much security theater and our feeling of security becomes greater than the reality, which is also bad. And others — politicians, corporations and so on — can use security theater to make us feel more secure without doing the hard work of actually making us secure. That’s the usual way security theater is used, and why I so often malign it.

But to write off security theater completely is to ignore the feeling of security. And as long as people are involved with security trade-offs, that’s never going to work.

This essay appeared on Wired.com, and is dedicated to my new godson, Nicholas Quillen Perry.

EDITED TO ADD: This essay has been translated into Portuguese.

Posted on January 25, 2007 at 5:50 AMView Comments

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.