Entries Tagged "replay attacks"

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Security Vulnerability in Internet-Connected Construction Cranes

This seems bad:

The F25 software was found to contain a capture replay vulnerability — basically an attacker would be able to eavesdrop on radio transmissions between the crane and the controller, and then send their own spoofed commands over the air to seize control of the crane.

“These devices use fixed codes that are reproducible by sniffing and re-transmission,” US-CERT explained.

“This can lead to unauthorized replay of a command, spoofing of an arbitrary message, or keeping the controlled load in a permanent ‘stop’ state.”

Here’s the CERT advisory.

Posted on October 29, 2018 at 6:18 AMView Comments

Vulnerabilities in Online Payment Systems

This hack was conducted as a research project. It’s unlikely it’s being done in the wild:

In one attack, Wang and colleagues used a plug-in for the Firefox web browser to examine data being sent and received by the online retailer Buy.com. When users make a purchase, Buy.com directs them to PayPal. Once they have paid, PayPal sends Buy.com a confirmation message tagged with a code that identifies the transaction.

PayPal handles its side of the process securely, says Wang, but Buy.com was relatively easy to fool. First the team purchased an item and noted the confirmation code used by PayPal. Then they selected a second item on Buy.com but did not pay up. Instead, they used the code from the first transaction to fake a confirmation message, which Buy.com accepted as proof of payment.

Paper here.

Posted on May 9, 2011 at 1:50 PMView Comments

Firesheep

Firesheep is a new Firefox plugin that makes it easy for you to hijack other people’s social network connections. Basically, Facebook authenticates clients with cookies. If someone is using a public WiFi connection, the cookies are sniffable. Firesheep uses wincap to capture and display the authentication information for accounts it sees, allowing you to hijack the connection.

Slides from the Toorcon talk.

Protect yourself by forcing the authentication to happen over TLS. Or stop logging in to Facebook from public networks.

EDITED TO ADD (10/27): To protect against this attack, you have to encrypt the entire session — not just the initial authentication.

EDITED TO ADD (11/4): Foiling Firesheep.

EDITED TO ADD (11/10): More info.

EDITED TO ADD (11/17): Blacksheep detects Firesheep.

Posted on October 27, 2010 at 7:53 AMView Comments

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.