Entries Tagged "RC4"

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New RC4 Attack

New research: “All Your Biases Belong To Us: Breaking RC4 in WPA-TKIP and TLS,” by Mathy Vanhoef and Frank Piessens:

Abstract: We present new biases in RC4, break the Wi-Fi Protected Access Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (WPA-TKIP), and design a practical plaintext recovery attack against the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol. To empirically find new biases in the RC4 keystream we use statistical hypothesis tests. This reveals many new biases in the initial keystream bytes, as well as several new long-term biases. Our fixed-plaintext recovery algorithms are capable of using multiple types of biases, and return a list of plaintext candidates in decreasing likelihood.

To break WPA-TKIP we introduce a method to generate a large number of identical packets. This packet is decrypted by generating its plaintext candidate list, and using redundant packet structure to prune bad candidates. From the decrypted packet we derive the TKIP MIC key, which can be used to inject and decrypt packets. In practice the attack can be executed within an hour. We also attack TLS as used by HTTPS, where we show how to decrypt a secure cookie with a success rate of 94% using 9*227 ciphertexts. This is done by injecting known data around the cookie, abusing this using Mantin’s ABSAB bias, and brute-forcing the cookie by traversing the plaintext candidates. Using our traffic generation technique, we are able to execute the attack in merely 75 hours.

News articles.

We need to deprecate the algorithm already.

Posted on July 28, 2015 at 12:09 PMView Comments

Spritz: A New RC4-Like Stream Cipher

Last week, Ron Rivest gave a talk at MIT about Spritz, a new stream cipher by him and Jacob Schuldt. It’s basically a redesign of RC4, given current cryptographic tools and knowledge.

RC4 is an example of what I think of as a too-good-to-be-true cipher. It looks so simple. It is so simple. In classic cryptographic terms, it’s a single rotor machine. It’s a single self-modifying rotor, but it modifies itself very slowly. Even so, it’s very hard to cryptanalyze. Even though the single rotor leaks information about its internal state with every output byte, its self-modifying structure always seems to stay ahead of analysis. But RC4 been around for over 25 years, and the best attacks are at the edge of practicality. When I talk about what sorts of secret cryptographic advances the NSA might have, a practical RC4 attack is one of the possibilities.

Spritz is Rivest and Schuldt’s redesign of RC4. It retains all of the problems that RC4 had. It’s built on a 256-element array of bytes, making it less than ideal for modern 32-bit and 64-bit CPUs. It’s not very fast. (It’s 50% slower than RC4, which was already much slower than algorithms like AES and Threefish.) It has a long key setup. But it’s a very clever design.

Here are the cores of RC4 and Spritz:

RC4:

1: i = i + 1
2: j = j + S[i]
3: SWAP(S[i];S[j])
4: z = S[S[i] + S[j]]
5: Return z

Spritz:

1: i = i + w
2: j = k + S[j + S[i]]
2a: k = i + k + S[j]
3: SWAP(S[i];S[j])
4: z = S[j + S[i + S[z + k]]]
5: Return z

S is an 8-bit permutation. In theory, it can be any size, which is nice for analysis, but in practice, it’s a 256-element array. RC4 has two pointers into the array: i and j. Spritz adds a third: k. The parameter w is basically a constant. It’s always 1 in RC4, but can be any odd number in Spritz (odd because that means it’s always relatively prime to 256). In both ciphers, i slowly walks around the array, and j — or j and k — bounce around wildly. Both have a single swap of two elements of the array. And both produce an output byte, z, a function of all the other parameters. In Spritz, the previous z is part of the calculation of the current z.

That’s the core. There are also functions for turning the key into the initial array permutation, using this as a stream cipher, using it as a hash function, and so on. It’s basically a sponge function, so it has a lot of applications.

What’s really interesting here is the way Rivest and Schuldt chose their various functions. They basically tried them all (given some constraints), and chose the ones with the best security properties. This is the sort of thing that can only be done with massive computing power.

I have always really liked RC4, and am happy to see a 21st-century redesign. I don’t know what kind of use it’ll get with its 8-bit word size, but surely there’s a niche for it somewhere.

Posted on October 27, 2014 at 9:55 AMView Comments

New RC4 Attack

This is a really clever attack on the RC4 encryption algorithm as used in TLS.

We have found a new attack against TLS that allows an attacker to recover a limited amount of plaintext from a TLS connection when RC4 encryption is used. The attacks arise from statistical flaws in the keystream generated by the RC4 algorithm which become apparent in TLS ciphertexts when the same plaintext is repeatedly encrypted at a fixed location across many TLS sessions.

The attack is very specialized:

The attack is a multi-session attack, which means that we require a target plaintext to be repeatedly sent in the same position in the plaintext stream in multiple TLS sessions. The attack currently only targets the first 256 bytes of the plaintext stream in sessions. Since the first 36 bytes of plaintext are formed from an unpredictable Finished message when SHA-1 is the selected hashing algorithm in the TLS Record Protocol, these first 36 bytes cannot be recovered. This means that the attack can recover 220 bytes of TLS-encrypted plaintext.

The number of sessions needed to reliably recover these plaintext bytes is around 230, but already with only 224 sessions, certain bytes can be recovered reliably.

Is this a big deal? Yes and no. The attack requires the identical plaintext to be repeatedly encrypted. Normally, this would make for an impractical attack in the real world, but http messages often have stylized headers that are identical across a conversation — for example, cookies. On the other hand, those are the only bits that can be decrypted. Currently, this attack is pretty raw and unoptimized — so it’s likely to become faster and better.

There’s no reason to panic here. But let’s start to move away from RC4 to something like AES.

There are lots of press articles on the attack.

Posted on March 29, 2013 at 6:59 AMView Comments

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.