Entries Tagged "Bluetooth"

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Attack on the Bluetooth Pairing Process

There’s a new cryptographic result against Bluetooth. Yaniv Shaked and Avishai Wool of Tel Aviv University in Israel have figured out how to recover the PIN by eavesdropping on the pairing process.

Pairing is an important part of Bluetooth. It’s how two devices — a phone and a headset, for example — associate themselves with one another. They generate a shared secret that they use for all future communication. Pairing is why, when on a crowded subway, your Bluetooth devices don’t link up with all the other Bluetooth devices carried by everyone else.

According to the Bluetooth specification, PINs can be 8-128 bits long. Unfortunately, most manufacturers have standardized on a four decimal-digit PIN. This attack can crack that 4-digit PIN in less than 0.3 sec on an old Pentium III 450MHz computer, and in 0.06 sec on a Pentium IV 3Ghz HT computer.

At first glance, this attack isn’t a big deal. It only works if you can eavesdrop on the pairing process. Pairing is something that occurs rarely, and generally in the safety of your home or office. But the authors have figured out how to force a pair of Bluetooth devices to repeat the pairing process, allowing them to eavesdrop on it. They pretend to be one of the two devices, and send a message to the other claiming to have forgotten the link key. This prompts the other device to discard the key, and the two then begin a new pairing session.

Taken together, this is an impressive result. I can’t be sure, but I believe it would allow an attacker to take control of someone’s Bluetooth devices. Certainly it allows an attacker to eavesdrop on someone’s Bluetooth network.

News story here.

Posted on June 3, 2005 at 10:19 AMView Comments

Bluetooth Sniper Rifle

We’ve all known that you can intercept Bluetooth communications from up to a mile away. What’s new is the step-by-step instructions necessary to build an interceptor for yourself for less than $400. Be the first on your block to build one.

Is there anyone who can make a reasonable argument that RFID won’t be similarly interceptable?

Posted on April 13, 2005 at 12:47 PMView Comments

Automobile Virus

SC Magazine is reporting on a virus that infects Lexus cars:

Lexus cars may be vulnerable to viruses that infect them via mobile phones. Landcruiser 100 models LX470 and LS430 have been discovered with infected operating systems that transfer within a range of 15 feet.

It seems that no one has done this yet, and the story is based on speculation that a cell phone can transfer a virus to the Lexus using Bluetooth. But it’s only a matter of time before something like this actually works.

Posted on February 2, 2005 at 8:00 AMView Comments

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.